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D&D General How am I a D&D outlier? How are you one?

TwoSix

Dirty, realism-hating munchkin powergamer
Data point of one, but yeah...I think that's unusual. I've been a member of several gaming groups over the years, and few of them last more than 6 months.
Yea, my groups are 22 years old, 12 years old, 7 years old, and 4 years old, respectively. I've been in a few groups for shorter periods, but I can't imagine that as my norm.

Honestly, at age 43, I'd rather just quit RPing than go around looking for groups.
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Supporter
Out of curiosity (as I am a GenX white dude whose gaming peeps are mostly GenX white folk) have you seen a marked increase in people of color playing D&D in your gaming cicles (whatever those may be)?
Some, but not much.

There were no other PoC in my first exposed to D&D in 1977. I used to game with one black guy (different group, city & state) back in the 1980s, and another briefly joined a group I was in in the early 2000s*. There’s another black dude I know who is a veteran gamer who works at one of the better game stores around here, but weve never tossed dice together.

In the same period, I’ve gamed with 3-4 “East” Asians and a similar number of Hispanics.

So that’s 10-12 PoC gamers I’ve gamed with in 44 years?**

I’ve seen a fairly sizable number of southeast Asians and middle-eastern gamers in the stores I frequent, though, so I know change is occurring.




* although, hilariously Clark Kent/Superman-like, we were almost never at the same session. I think we only gamed together twice.

**And, FWIW, in that same stretch of time, just over half that number in women gamers, 4 of whom were in one group.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Supporter
Yea, my groups are 22 years old, 12 years old, 7 years old, and 4 years old, respectively. I've been in a few groups for shorter periods, but I can't imagine that as my norm.

Honestly, at age 43, I'd rather just quit RPing than go around looking for groups.
Ditto a lot of that. Most of my gaming groups lasted years, not months.

My last group (of 20+ years) and I parted ways a few years ago. I still talk, think, discuss and BUY RPGs, but I haven’t so much as looked for a new group.
 

Reynard

Legend
Supporter
**And, FWIW, in that same stretch of time, just over half that number in women gamers, 4 of whom were in one group.
About 8 or 9 years ago I started running games at cons and met many great folks, and my gaming circle expanded. Most of those people are GenX white people, but there were quite a few women (where my previous circle had only had very few women gaming, and most of those by way of 90s not-D&D games like WoD).
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Supporter
About 8 or 9 years ago I started running games at cons and met many great folks, and my gaming circle expanded. Most of those people are GenX white people, but there were quite a few women (where my previous circle had only had very few women gaming, and most of those by way of 90s not-D&D games like WoD).
That’s not a surprise to me, honestly. But I’ve personally only been to a couple of cons, and didn’t really have a great time. The last one, I was scheduled to run a game, only to have all but one of the sign-ups bail in me. So I cancelled the session and just shopped the con. Yay!/Yay.
 

Reynard

Legend
Supporter
That’s not a surprise to me, honestly. But I’ve personally only been to a couple of cons, and didn’t really have a great time. The last one, I was scheduled to run a game, only to have all but one of the sign-ups bail in me. So I cancelled the session and just shopped the con. Yay!/Yay.
Yeah, that's the worst.
 




Jack Daniel

dice-universe.blogspot.com
Very interesting subject! How am I a D&D outlier? Uff da, let me count the ways…

1. My go-to edition is OD&D (by which I mean the white box, blue box, red box, and black box* editions; they're all coequal in my eyes and not different enough from each other for me to go about drawing pedantic distinctions).

2. My ideal campaign model—the one I always strive for, even if I rarely achieve it—is a Lake Geneva style "fantasy wargaming" club. Lots of players with lots of characters who form their own parties West Marches style to explore a persistent sandbox milieu containing many dungeons, possibly playing within the same world for years, possibly reaching very high levels and building dominions that could eventually lead to some entertaining large-scale (and possibly PvP) wargaming.

3. Because I learned to play from 90s DMs who idealized "role-playing, not roll-playing!", railroady epic fantasy stories, and fudging whatever (dice-rolls, encounters, the game-world itself) in the name of telling a good story, I now have a deep, abiding, visceral hatred for narrative-heavy, thespianism-heavy, improv-heavy play-styles. Players want to treat their characters as blank-slate (or self-insert) pawns in the dungeon? Cool by me if it means I don't have to put up with Alefist MacAxebeard, Stereotypical Scottish-Accented Drunken Violent Boorish Dwarf #8,572.

4. I believe that my job as Dungeon Master is to create the game world—populating each hex, dungeon, and town with as much fleshed-out detail as is reasonable to produce ahead of time—so that the players can meaningfully explore it on their own terms. Once the game starts, I'm not the players' enemy, I'm not their fan, I'm just the impartial referee trying to fairly portray the world I've built. I won't fudge dice, I won't fudge monster stats, and I'll never ever move some piece of the game-world or lovingly-crafted encounter into the players' path just because I'd like for the players encounter this or that bit of content. For me, that would be literal cheating on my part.

5. I vehemently disagree with anybody who claims that D&D "can't do" genres beyond sword & sorcery or pseudo-medieval high fantasy. In fact, my preferred milieu is Victorian steampunk or gaslamp fantasy. But I'll also happily use the OD&D rules to run games set in ancient, historical, present-day, or futuristic worlds, both magical and mundane. The period or genre, after all, is just a backdrop—a coat of paint on the game. As long as there are "dungeons" (or the period-appropriate equivalent) to explore and hexes to crawl (even if a hex represents a cubic parsec of interstellar space rather than a square league of wilderness), the game itself works just fine. The key to making OD&D function in any setting is simply to keep the game about exploration and treasure-hunting.

6. I pretty much don't run modules at all if I can avoid it. Entirely aside of the fact that I just plain don't like most published adventures, dungeon-design and adventure-creation are entirely too much fun for me to ever want to skip that part!

* For the curious, I'm a Millennial who started gaming on black box OD&D and 2nd Edition AD&D.
 
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