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How do you like (or don't like) the Savage Worlds rpg?

And I apologize if my response seemed overly defensive, which also wasn't my intent. Haha.

To add to my above criticism of the system, I have run only vanilla fantasy Savage Worlds (which was something of a letdown after converting the campaign from 4e D&D) and Savage Rifts (which is probably the most complex iteration of the system).

Savage Worlds is one of those games you can absolutely get different feelings about depending on what genres you run it in (see my comment to the person above about mooks and what a difference a fantasy game and a modern or futuristic game with guns can bring); as an example, there are serious problems that can crop up with a lot of people using the Super Powers Companion and supers most SW players will never see.
 

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Retreater

Legend
Savage Worlds is one of those games you can absolutely get different feelings about depending on what genres you run it in (see my comment to the person above about mooks and what a difference a fantasy game and a modern or futuristic game with guns can bring); as an example, there are serious problems that can crop up with a lot of people using the Super Powers Companion and supers most SW players will never see.
My friend is having a great time with Deadlands. Even though I purchased it, I'm finding that I don't really like the setting, which I think borders on sacrilege among SW fans. (Cowboys just don't appeal to me.)
I backed Savage Pathfinder. That might be a sweet spot for the system for me if I can ever get it to the table. I'm hesitant to try to learn/teach crunchier systems over VTT, and that's the only game in town these days for me (and likely for the rest of time). [It doesn't help that the only available adventure - the Runelords AP - has been played by everyone and their mom by this point.]
 

Azuresun

Adventurer
Hiya!

I have the PDF and maybe one or two supplements for it. Gave them a "skim-through". Seemed like a decent enough, light system. But, because it's "lite", I'd find it hard to use for anything with "high power" needed (re: super-heroes, Rifts-like, epic space opera, etc).

Which is funny, because Savage Worlds Rifts is an actual licensed setting. Having played both, I'd say it works far better for that sort of gonzo action-movie stuff than the actual Rifts system (and characters like Juicers or Leyline Walkers feel far more thematic), though the system tends to break down once you get into Toughness + Armour scores over 30.
 

thullgrim

Explorer
I’m currently running a Savage Worlds based Masks of Nyarlathotep campaign on a weekly basis and a Deadlands game on a monthly basis.

I generally find Savage Worlds hits a sweet spot between crunch, ease of play, and prep time. I love cards but can why others don’t. One commenter mentioned something up thread concerning in person vs VTT play they are absolutely correct.
There is a tactile quality to Savage Worlds in person that really comes through in person.

Things I like about SW: it’s fast, it has decent narrative tools, can handle social conflict, has an amazing community of creative developers, and an incredible depth of support and supplements.

Things I don’t like about SW: Charactet differentiation and niche protection can be an issue. There are some obvious ‘wins’ in the edge selection. Every time you play SW it feels like you are playing SW. I don’t know if that makes sense or not. That same amazing community has some rough edges at times. They REALLY like SW and can at times be down on other games or hacks of the system itself. Not content, they love content, settings, new options, etc. but if you try and mess with the fundamentals of the system and go looking for help you can sometimes be criticized pretty heavily.
 

Retreater

Legend
Which is funny, because Savage Worlds Rifts is an actual licensed setting. Having played both, I'd say it works far better for that sort of gonzo action-movie stuff than the actual Rifts system (and characters like Juicers or Leyline Walkers feel far more thematic), though the system tends to break down once you get into Toughness + Armour scores over 30.
Yeah I'm a little concerned with the announcement during GenCon that the lead developer of Savage Rifts is going to work full-time with Palladium. It might slow down Pinnacle's development of Savage Rifts. But I guess it doesn't matter a lot to me since I'm not actively playing Savage Worlds of any variety.
 

eyeheartawk

Works 60% of the time, every time
Which is funny, because Savage Worlds Rifts is an actual licensed setting. Having played both, I'd say it works far better for that sort of gonzo action-movie stuff than the actual Rifts system (and characters like Juicers or Leyline Walkers feel far more thematic), though the system tends to break down once you get into Toughness + Armour scores over 30.
I don't like Savage Rifts for a few reasons, mainly the completely unnecessary premise change that you are now good bois crusading from your good boi castle, but it does have better rules than Palladium.

But, I mean, that's a really low bar, you know? Pretty much anything is going to be better than house ruled AD&D 1E with 30 years of junk hanging off of it.
 

akr71

Hero
My group has been playing SW as our 'side game' for a few months now, maybe closer to a year. I'm a player rather than the DM in our regular game, so it was entirely new to me. The one running these sessions has said "I'll play any game, but as far as running, I only want to run Savage Worlds now." Overall I like it - here are a few other thoughts:
  • I like the combat system. You can hit, but do no damage. You can hit and damage, but your opponent is still standing
  • The exploding dice mechanic is cool. Even the lowliest minion can get be deadly, even the biggest baddest boss can be taken out with a lucky shot. It makes combat 'swingy' but I like that
  • The robust skill system is nice.
  • The Feats/Edges stuff & their prerequisites are sometimes hard to follow. I would like a table with 'Novice' Edges, 'Seasoned Edges' etc rather than the lists that are presented in the book.
  • I like that it is designed and easily adaptable to different genres. We started with an Eerie East (we live on the east coast, so a take on the Deadlands Weird West) campaign and now have moved to Deadlands Noir - 1930's New Orleans. We've talked about a cyberpunk & post-apocalyptic campaign too. The guy running these games also supported the Savage Worlds for Pathfinder kickstarter so I know he wants to run a fantasy game with that sometime too.
  • Bennies - A built in 'Mulligan' system for when the dice betray you. I like it.
 
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Which is funny, because Savage Worlds Rifts is an actual licensed setting. Having played both, I'd say it works far better for that sort of gonzo action-movie stuff than the actual Rifts system (and characters like Juicers or Leyline Walkers feel far more thematic), though the system tends to break down once you get into Toughness + Armour scores over 30.

Properly handling high-powered play of that sort tends to be a challenge for any system not designed from the getgo for something like supers. SW is only modestly better than the Palladium house system in that regard.
 

Things I don’t like about SW: Charactet differentiation and niche protection can be an issue. There are some obvious ‘wins’ in the edge selection. Every time you play SW it feels like you are playing SW. I don’t know if that makes sense or not. That same amazing community has some rough edges at times. They REALLY like SW and can at times be down on other games or hacks of the system itself. Not content, they love content, settings, new options, etc. but if you try and mess with the fundamentals of the system and go looking for help you can sometimes be criticized pretty heavily.

Unfortunately this is an issue with any community dedicated to a system, especially a multi-purpose system; I've seen the same things with other games of a similar nature.
 

Retreater

Legend
I don't like Savage Rifts for a few reasons, mainly the completely unnecessary premise change that you are now good bois crusading from your good boi castle, but it does have better rules than Palladium.
That's very easily taken out of the game. I don't use the Tomorrow Legion when I run it.
 

It was probably inserted as an easy framing option for what people would be and be doing in a setting that can be a little hard to know where to start in. Pinnacle tends to have something like that in most of their settings.
 

Campbell

Legend
My personal take is that it is mostly a serviceable game, but for what it does there is almost always another game I would prefer to play or run. For Deadlands that game I prefer is Classic Deadlands by like a mile and a half. That probably colors my perception of Savage Worlds a fair bit.
 
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Ixal

Adventurer
Combat is imo much too swingy with exploding dice and toughtness stacking.
I also don't like how everything just has 3, sometimes 4 hits no matter what it is.
 


Azuresun

Adventurer
Unless they're minions, which have 1 HP.

I was going to say! Extras are one of the best things about SW, because they only have three states--fighting, shaken or off the tabl--and only one die to track when they did an action. It was the first system where I was able to run 20 NPC's in one fight (without cheating with mob rules) and not have the session take all night.
 

eyeheartawk

Works 60% of the time, every time
My personal take is that it is mostly a serviceable game, but for what it does there is almost always another game I would prefer to play or run. For Deadlands that game I prefer is Classic Deadlands by like a mile and a half. That probably colors my perception of Savage Worlds a fair bit.
I agree. Granted, OG Deadlands had separate sub-systems for a bunch of things, but they felt like Deadlands. Playing SW Deadlands now is no longer special because it plays the same as any other SW game.

That's not really an indictment on the playability of new jack Deadlands, but just an intangible feel thing for me.
 

That's always going to be a thing with people who really want a bespoke system for a given setting. Its a reasonable position, but I've got to say I'm reaching the point in my life I'm really not interested in learning more new systems than I have to, and I rarely stick with one setting/genre from campaign to campaign.
 

ehren37

Adventurer
What I don't like about the cards is taking the time to deal every round, reshuffling the deck every time you deal a joker, then calling out the numbers like a BINGO caller every round. This is further complicated when you have people hold their action, change their cards due to Edges or spending Bennies. Plus people always need reminding about suit order. And Jokers can go anytime they want, so you're always checking on them when they want to go.
In D&D games I use clothespins mounted on a strip of numbers on my DM Screen. I put them in order at the start of a fight (which takes less than a minute) and we're good to go for an entire combat. Everyone can see the order and knows when his or her turn is coming up.
Cards are faster IMO. You have a ceiling of fastest so can quickly count down. I find this faster than doing an initiative grid with 5+ people barking their initiative all at once for you to somehow write down, with initiative for each NPC unit. Not rolling for initiative each round is boring to me as well, as it makes fights too predictable when you know how many actions your side gets before the enemies go.
 


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