D&D 5E How does your group determine ability scores?

Which method of determining ability scores is the most used in your D&D 5E group?

  • Roll 4d6, drop lowest

    Votes: 43 29.5%
  • Default scores (15, 14, 13, 12, 10, 8)

    Votes: 24 16.4%
  • Customizing ability scores variant (point-buy)

    Votes: 60 41.1%
  • Mix of rolled and default

    Votes: 1 0.7%
  • Mix of rolled and customizing

    Votes: 6 4.1%
  • Mix of default and customizing

    Votes: 8 5.5%
  • Mix of all three

    Votes: 10 6.8%
  • Other (please specify)

    Votes: 22 15.1%

  • Poll closed .

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Oofta

Legend
I explained a bit more. I also give back feedback to you. Please take the post at face value, don't make it a question of who is superior to someone else.

I meant no offense. I was trying to be helpful because intent is not always clear, what we say is often easily misconstrued. Like you seem to be taking offense at my trying to be clear that I don't doubt your intent but that doesn't change how you stated things could easily be taken the wrong way. Forums can be terrible at subtlety, messages can be easily misread, intent is not always clear.
 

I meant no offense. I was trying to be helpful because intent is not always clear, what we say is often easily misconstrued. Like you seem to be taking offense at my trying to be clear that I don't doubt your intent but that doesn't change how you stated things could easily be taken the wrong way. Forums can be terrible at subtlety, messages can be easily misread, intent is not always clear.

I totally agree here! I also edited my first post to be hopefully a bit clearer.
 

Oofta

Legend
What tends to happen with point buy is that there becomes one way to build a hex blade and one way to build a Wizard, and so on (with two ways to build a Fighter - str-based and dex-based). The samey-ness isn't that all characters look the same, it's that all characters of the same class look the same.

Indeed. That's why I proposed allowing placement of two scores and then random placement of the rest.
Why do you know the ability score of other PCs? If you make cookie cutter PCs and it bothers you, that's on you not the system. I knew a guy that in every edition played 1 of 2 PCs, either a female (drow if allowed) elf sorcerer or a halfling rogue. Over multiple editions. Not my cup of tea, sometimes I optimize for combat, most of the time I try to make sure my PC has decent ability scores for out of combat as well.

I don't think you can get away from the fact that some people will always put the +2 to maximize their primary ability and prioritize secondary combat abilities next. Randomness just shifts the results a bit, I don't think it really changes the mindset.
 

payn

Legend
I will say that I kind of reject Point Buy out of hand as I just don't want to do the math. Not super excited about raw numbers themselves, so I'd rather use arrays that pick the PB results one would usually go for anyway.
Right. PB mattered a lot in 3E/PF1 because there was a lot more variance in mechanics and feats. With design based around bounded accuracy and typical class output, PB wont really net you anything different in 5E than an array.
 


Why do you know the ability score of other PCs? If you make cookie cutter PCs and it bothers you, that's on you not the system.

I half agree to this statement. You don't have to make a cookie curter pc, but sometimes it feels like deliberately shooting in your own foot if you do otherwise.
Of course it is always on yourself if you feel that way, but (partially) randomized creation in my opinion at least helps me not to feel that way when creating a not cookie cutter PC.
 

Vaalingrade

Legend
Right. PB mattered a lot in 3E/PF1 because there was a lot more variance in mechanics and feats. With design based around bounded accuracy and typical class output, PB wont really net you anything different in 5E than an array.
Also, not included in the poll, but there was the 3.5/4e option of having a number of available arrays to choose from.
 

payn

Legend
Also, not included in the pool, but there was the 3.5/4e option of having a number of available arrays to choose from.
PF2 came up with a seemingly clever "ABC" system. Start with a baseline all 10s. Pick you ancestry (formerly race) get a few stat bumps, pick your background get a few more bumps, pick your class and get your final bumps. It all works out to basically 2-4 different arrays and everyone just skips to it that way.
 



Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
I will say that I kind of reject Point Buy out of hand as I just don't want to do the math. Not super excited about raw numbers themselves, so I'd rather use arrays that pick the PB results one would usually go for anyway.
Yeah. At the local Los Angeles game conventions there is this PvP tournament with rules on making a character. You could use the standard array, point buy, magic items you can select, level, etc. What you can end up with for your character is pretty varied. One of my players was making a character under this system to test it out and came to me one day to show it to me. He was like, "I spent a few hours going over the various combinations of stats you can buy with points and the best stats I could come up with are 15, 14, 13, 12, 10, 8." I just sort of stared at him for a bit until he was like, "What?" Then I pulled out the PHB and pointed at the array. His face fell a bit as he realized how much time he had wasted, then he told me that he didn't see that before he started. :LOL:
 

PF2 came up with a seemingly clever "ABC" system. Start with a baseline all 10s. Pick you ancestry (formerly race) get a few stat bumps, pick your background get a few more bumps, pick your class and get your final bumps. It all works out to basically 2-4 different arrays and everyone just skips to it that way.
I don't talk positive about PF but this is the closest to a system I would like to replace rolling.

I would rather you start with 2 8's 2 12's an 11 and a 10 put where you want then those bumps
 

Meh. We also use Point Buy, and I guess the pros outweigh the cons, but the samey-ness of all the characters gets dull. Something has definitely been lost in the game.
Samey-ness??? Hardly.
There are hundreds of permutations for 27 point buy, and that is BEFORE species specific attributes are added on.

Now, to your point precisely, do you see a Barbarian and Fighter with the same starting stat block? Or a Druid and Cleric? If they are the same species? Quite possibly. But who cares? The chars may have overlapping functionality, so 27 point buy is working as designed. As I have read over millions of years of posts about this, char stats supposedly don't matter, and char play differentiates the chars, as long as all the chars start with a level playing field. So the fact that 27 point buy or Std array creates that level playing field is a most excellent thing.

If you seriously believe that dull chars are the result of initial starting stats, you would be mistaken. Dull chars are merely a product of not particularly imaginative and/nor invested players.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Samey-ness??? Hardly.
There are hundreds of permutations for 27 point buy, and that is BEFORE species specific attributes are added on.

Now, to your point precisely, do you see a Barbarian and Fighter with the same starting stat block? Or a Druid and Cleric? If they are the same species? Quite possibly. But who cares? The chars may have overlapping functionality, so 27 point buy is working as designed. As I have read over millions of years of posts about this, char stats supposedly don't matter, and char play differentiates the chars, as long as all the chars start with a level playing field. So the fact that 27 point buy or Std array creates that level playing field is a most excellent thing.

If you seriously believe that dull chars are the result of initial starting stats, you would be mistaken. Dull chars are merely a product of not particularly imaginative and/nor invested players.
Hundreds vs. millions = a strong feeling of sameyness to me. Rolling gives you 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3 to 18, 18, 18, 18, 18, 18 and everything in-between. Point buy forces you into the high middle to middle middle high range for stats. You can't have a stat below 8. Nor can you have more than 3 stats below 8, and you can only have those three if you buy exactly 3 15s. If you lower even one of those 15s to a 14, one or two of those 8's goes away.

Point buy is incredibly limiting when compared to rolling.
 

payn

Legend
I don't talk positive about PF but this is the closest to a system I would like to replace rolling.
That PF1, PF2, or both? I just ask because I know you are a 4E fan and PF2 has a lot to offer on that front. (Not a copy nor identical but shares a lot of design space more than 5E)
I would rather you start with 2 8's 2 12's an 11 and a 10 put where you want then those bumps
What are you trying to do here? Seems a bit convoluted for setting up a point buy.
 


PF2 came up with a seemingly clever "ABC" system. Start with a baseline all 10s. Pick you ancestry (formerly race) get a few stat bumps, pick your background get a few more bumps, pick your class and get your final bumps. It all works out to basically 2-4 different arrays and everyone just skips to it that way.
I like it- it's more of a lifepath system to figure out your scores rather than starting with scores and trying to make it work or going through a lot of work to arrange them according to your class. All the fun of point buy but the math is much easier.

It would be neat to try with 5e, if someone designs a setup for it.
 

payn

Legend
I like it- it's more of a lifepath system to figure out your scores rather than starting with scores and trying to make it work or going through a lot of work to arrange them according to your class. All the fun of point buy but the math is much easier.

It would be neat to try with 5e, if someone designs a setup for it.
I like it in theory, but PF2 is wound so tight that ultimately there is very little variance between lifepaths. Its just an illusion of a character coming together organically.
 


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