D&D 5E How does your group determine ability scores?

Which method of determining ability scores is the most used in your D&D 5E group?

  • Roll 4d6, drop lowest

    Votes: 43 29.5%
  • Default scores (15, 14, 13, 12, 10, 8)

    Votes: 24 16.4%
  • Customizing ability scores variant (point-buy)

    Votes: 60 41.1%
  • Mix of rolled and default

    Votes: 1 0.7%
  • Mix of rolled and customizing

    Votes: 6 4.1%
  • Mix of default and customizing

    Votes: 8 5.5%
  • Mix of all three

    Votes: 10 6.8%
  • Other (please specify)

    Votes: 22 15.1%

  • Poll closed .

Vaalingrade

Legend
I don't even thing 5 additional feats matter when rolling in order expressly lets the dice dictate what kind of character I can play. I like playing smooth talkers and diplomancers, but 'lol, 3 CHA, no persuasiveness for you'. And 5 feat won't fix that.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

payn

Legend
I don't even thing 5 additional feats matter when rolling in order expressly lets the dice dictate what kind of character I can play. I like playing smooth talkers and diplomancers, but 'lol, 3 CHA, no persuasiveness for you'. And 5 feat won't fix that.
This. The best random chargen systems (not many) allow for random generation, but allow you to still focus on what the character is skilled at.
 

aco175

Legend
I played once with each player having 4d6 of different colors and everyone had to drop the same color. We rolled strength and the fighter player got to choose and picked, say red, and everyone dropped the red d6 for strength. It went on for the other stats with players getting to choose which die to drop. I think we rolled to see who picked if it was a non SAD stat. I remember there was a few non-suspected stats like the mage having a 15 strength and the fighter having a 16 wisdom.
 

Endroren

Adventurer
Publisher
3d6 vs 4d6D1 is about 10,5 pts lower, so it would be 5 bonus feats.

or do you give a bonus feat for each 3d6 taken?
Nope. One bonus feat. We've had amazing characters with a couple 18s and heroes who have everything going against them, but in the end we always end up with a great story. It's not about the best score...it's about the challenge of turning a set of random stats into an amazing hero.
 

Endroren

Adventurer
Publisher
This. The best random chargen systems (not many) allow for random generation, but allow you to still focus on what the character is skilled at.
It's just a different approach. It's a fun challenge to get a completely random set of scores and build a cool story around them. That's why we do both. If you have a concept in mind you build it using 4d6, drop and assign. If you want to see what date throws at you, you can go that route.
 

jgsugden

Legend
2d6+4 six times. You can either elect to reorder them, or elect to take them in order and get a minor perk as a bonus (a weak feat, a minor magic item, an ally, etc...). You can opt out and take the point buy option if you do not like your result.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
I don't even thing 5 additional feats matter when rolling in order expressly lets the dice dictate what kind of character I can play. I like playing smooth talkers and diplomancers, but 'lol, 3 CHA, no persuasiveness for you'. And 5 feat won't fix that.
This isn't RAW. By RAW you get to roll all 6 stats and then place them where desires, so you will only have a 3 charisma if you roll 6 3's(not gonna happen) or choose to put a 3 into charisma and then complain about not being able to play a persuasive character.
 


Vaalingrade

Legend
This isn't RAW. By RAW you get to roll all 6 stats and then place them where desires, so you will only have a 3 charisma if you roll 6 3's(not gonna happen) or choose to put a 3 into charisma and then complain about not being able to play a persuasive character.
I... was talking about someone else's rolling method and never mentioned RAW at all?

There was literally no reason to go off on me about RAW?
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
I... was talking about someone else's rolling method and never mentioned RAW at all?

There was literally no reason to go off on me about RAW?
Chalk it up to your refusal to actually quote people you are responding to. No way for me to know that you weren't talking about the standard rolling method. 🤷‍♂️
 


Slit518

Adventurer
I chose other.

We choose Stats by a series of challenges. Each challenge has a grading system, 6-18.

There are 6 challenges in total which will challenge a person's abilities.

Then, at the end of each challenge they are scored.

The twist is, just because you scored something on a Stat for a particular challenge doesn't mean you have to use it that way, you can use that number any way you wish.

So for example if you score a 12 on the Feat of Might challenge, you don't have to put the 12 in Strength, you could put it in one of the other 5.

So far no player has been all 6's and no player has been all 18's.

We see a lot of 10's more than anything with the occasional 8 or 9, and or a 14 or 15.

Then you add your Racial bonuses after.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
27 point buy of course. That and Std array are the only fair ways.
Clearly not true.

Firstly 27 point buy means different things to different classes. 5e isn’t as bad about this as 3.5, but some classes only need 1 high score and some need up to 3. So it’s relatively fair, but certainly not unambiguously fair.

Secondly, there are a plethora of equally fair methods, or even more fair methods.

Point buy by class - either giving the weaker classes a little extra, or giving MAD classes a higher point buy than SAD classes. This brings the playing field between classes closer to level.

6+2d6, reroll 1s. You get some randomization, but within a band that is quite fair. You could normalize it even further by making it 6+3d6, drop lowest, reroll 1s, especially if you just enjoy the added freedom of a higher average score, allowing things like Wizard/Druid combos that don’t suck.

All stats are 14 (or 15, etc) Simple, arguably boring, at least as fair as standard array.

Literally let the players choose thier stats, with a cap of 16 total and a floor of 8. Requires an honest and non-power gaming group, but as long as everyone at the table feels like they are getting a fair deal, it’s fair.

Everyone rolls 2 sets with a reliable rolling method, and then everyone chooses a set.

Everyone rolls 2 or more sets and the group chooses a set that acts as that campaign’s “standard array”.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
I chose other, because really our system is “roll sets until you like one, make sure everyone is happy and no one is way out of sync”. Technically our system is 4d6 drop lowest, reroll 1s, roll at least 2 sets, choose a set.

Or we do point buy. We have done higher point buy, but oddly it leads to more “all in the middle” builds. So many 14s.

And we recently tried 6+3d6, drop lowest, reroll 1s. It’s fun.
 

Horwath

Hero
Clearly not true.

Firstly 27 point buy means different things to different classes. 5e isn’t as bad about this as 3.5, but some classes only need 1 high score and some need up to 3. So it’s relatively fair, but certainly not unambiguously fair.

Secondly, there are a plethora of equally fair methods, or even more fair methods.

Point buy by class - either giving the weaker classes a little extra, or giving MAD classes a higher point buy than SAD classes. This brings the playing field between classes closer to level.

6+2d6, reroll 1s. You get some randomization, but within a band that is quite fair. You could normalize it even further by making it 6+3d6, drop lowest, reroll 1s, especially if you just enjoy the added freedom of a higher average score, allowing things like Wizard/Druid combos that don’t suck.

All stats are 14 (or 15, etc) Simple, arguably boring, at least as fair as standard array.

Literally let the players choose thier stats, with a cap of 16 total and a floor of 8. Requires an honest and non-power gaming group, but as long as everyone at the table feels like they are getting a fair deal, it’s fair.

Everyone rolls 2 sets with a reliable rolling method, and then everyone chooses a set.

Everyone rolls 2 or more sets and the group chooses a set that acts as that campaign’s “standard array”.
well, every class needs primary ability and Con of 14.

If you increase pool to 32(like PF1) and still keep the cap score of 15 at start, you can cover MAD classes, and to SAD classes gives a nice option for tertiary abilities, and we can see less insert any stat except Con of 8.

with 32pt buy pool we see lot more Cha 12 fighters, rangers and rogues while still having primary and Con "sorted out".
 




Horwath

Hero
Meh. We also use Point Buy, and I guess the pros outweigh the cons, but the samey-ness of all the characters gets dull. Something has definitely been lost in the game.
I have opposite experience,

in last campaign, we had at extremes in 15,15,15,8,8,8 and 13,13,13,12,12,12 and 3 other scores in between.

only if you "default" to default array, will you have "samey-ness"
 

delericho

Legend
Meh. We also use Point Buy, and I guess the pros outweigh the cons, but the samey-ness of all the characters gets dull. Something has definitely been lost in the game.
I find myself wondering how much of that "samey-ness" is really down to Point Buy (or standard array), and how much is down to the ability to place the six scores as desired. Because when you roll much of the time you're going to get an array that isn't all that far off something you could buy anyway (after all, that's why the array/point buy was constructed the way it was). So you're not necessarily going to get something wildly different anyway.

I wonder, therefore, if the antidote to the "samey-ness" isn't rather to allow the player to assign, say, the top 2 scores to their chosen attributes, but then randomize the placement of the others. That would mean the player could always play their chosen class without issue, but one Fighter might be intelligent but not dextrous with another is wise but not charismatic.

Just a thought.
 

Dungeon Delver's Guide

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top