D&D General "I have played in or run a D&D campaign set in Eberron." (a poll)

True or False: "I have played in or run a D&D campaign set in Eberron."

  • True.

    Votes: 53 54.6%
  • False.

    Votes: 44 45.4%

Maialideth

Explorer
I haven't played in any other campaign setting since Eberron came out, both in 3.5, 4e, and 5e (except when I ran Curse of Strahd, but I used The Mourning as the trigger that sent the players to Barovia, and they returned to Eberron afterwards, where we continued the campaign for 2 more years).
 

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Vaalingrade

Legend
Yeah, it's got lot of areas specifically designed to
Putting in blimps and lightning rails while running metropolises with skyscrapers kinda changes the default assumption of most standard D&D adventures.
Like the might railroad, the lightning rail connects Point A and Point B, and not all points in between.

And airships need docking towers. I've seen the incredible pain that comes of people trying to land a blimp.
 

payn

Legend
If you put in the background the things that make the setting unique, why even play in Eberron?
If you're going to run Ghosts of Saltmarsh in Eberron and not put blimps and robots in it, why not just keep it in Greyhawk?
There are interesting factions, history between dragons and giants, and all sorts of standard fantasy that is unique to Eberron. I get that seemingly not being appealing, I didn't dig it at first either, but after experiencing it I enjoy it. Eventually, you can slowly let the weird in and spice up the game so its not all at you at once.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
Yep, I've played it. I'm still playing it, actually. (Our DM has told us that we're heading to the grand finale soon, though, and that the campaign is drawing to a close.) It's been fun! It's a bit more 'magi-tech' than I'm used to, and I can see how it might not appeal to everyone. Eberron's overall vibe reminds me more of video game franchises like Final Fantasy and Chrono Trigger, and less like fantasy fiction books like Lord of the Rings or A Game of Thrones.

It's not something I would want to play every time, but certainly worth checking out if you're a fan of MMORPGs and Square-Enix.
 



Yora

Legend
The one part of Eberron I find somewhat interesting is the West Coast. Demon Wastes, Eldeen Reaches, Shadow Marches, Darguun. If I would get invited to an Eberron campaign and the GM asks us what region we prefer, that would be my pick.

But it's still not that interesting that Eberron would be my choice for setting in general. There are so many other settings I would want to play more than that.
 



TwoSix

Unserious gamer
If you put in the background the things that make the setting unique, why even play in Eberron?
If you're going to run Ghosts of Saltmarsh in Eberron and not put blimps and robots in it, why not just keep it in Greyhawk?
Because it has plenty of interesting stuff just including the normal stuff for a kitchen sink fantasy campaign setting.

It has interesting dieties and takes on religion. It has a really nice map with room for all sorts of standard adventures. It has an interesting take on the outer planes if your game moves into planar adventures.

Basically, it does all the same stuff that FR or Greyhawk already do, but also has interesting stuff on top of that if you want it.
 

I've never played or run an Eberron game, but I've pillaged the books for ideas and mechanics. At this point, if I want a magitech setting, I'm going to use my homebrew setting (which also pulls heavily from Guildmasters Guide to Ravnica).
 

Reynard

Legend
I've never played or run an Eberron game, but I've pillaged the books for ideas and mechanics. At this point, if I want a magitech setting, I'm going to use my homebrew setting (which also pulls heavily from Guildmasters Guide to Ravnica).
Eberron isn't magitech. it is fantasy in which magic is treated like a science. There's a difference.
 


Synthil

Explorer
It has interesting dieties and takes on religion.
It's the only setting where I have ever played a religious character. And it wasn't even a cleric or a paladin but an alchemist! The religions are way more relatable to me, being actually based on faith and mortal tradition. The religions are also varied enough to have something for a lot of different character types.
 

James Gasik

Legend
Supporter
Yeah, D&D has for too long been carried away with actual Gods having avatars pop up and running amok. I prefer Gods who are more mysterious and distanced, not just uber powerful NPC's (as Forgotten Realms and Dragonlance treats them).

EDIT: Reorx is a freaking quest giver and Mystra (Midnight) basically goes on adventures!
 

grimslade

Krampus ate my d20s
I have played and run a few Eberron campaigns. It is a great setting and even better if you follow along with Keith Baker's blog. I am continually inspired and pumped up reading his takes on things. Even with dinosaur riding halflings and the Lightning rail, Eberron feels the closest to Greyhawk and grey box Forgotten Realms to me. There is boundless places to make the world your own and tell the stories you want to tell.
 

Gradine

Final Form (she/they)
Now Eberron has been my go-to campaign setting for years, though I think I'm either going Spelljammer or homebrew for my next campaign, whenever that happens (as I'm currently DMing SW5e)
 


Stormonu

Legend
I started one set in Xen'drik that was meant to be like LOST.

Unfortunately, it lasted only one session before the group decided they wanted to try something non-D&D.

Player's map for the campaign (24" X 36" map)
101_1315.JPG
 


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