I love AD&D

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Just to kick this most excellent thread up to the 100-reply point so it gets the neat little orange ball to the left of the listings... :)

Part of what makes 1e so much fun is the sense of mystery. The DMG and MM are intended to be off limits to players, as is anything on the back (i.e. DM's) side of the DM screen...and while astute players can eventually figure out the math behind the system if they want to, the emphasis is not put on doing so, leaving a clear field for immersion, story-telling, mule-kicking, or any desired combination of these.

Lanefan
 

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Part of what makes 1e so much fun is the sense of mystery. The DMG and MM are intended to be off limits to players, as is anything on the back (i.e. DM's) side of the DM screen...and while astute players can eventually figure out the math behind the system if they want to, the emphasis is not put on doing so, leaving a clear field for immersion, story-telling, mule-kicking, or any desired combination of these.

Lanefan


Off limits? Players peeking into the the sacred tome of the DM were regarded as somewhat less than worthy of an honorable death!! :)

One of the greatest strengths of AD&D was flexibility. There were so many rules and subsystems that could be included or excluded as desired without having to rework the whole system. Sometimes we used the training rules and sometimes not. The weapon type vs armor type modifiers were played with very briefly then skipped and the games kept running smoothly. Looking back at all the cool stuff that was optional, I see AD&D as more of a build your own game kit than a regular game system, at least it was for us.:lol:
 

thedungeondelver

Adventurer

As I mentioned earlier, a lot of the awesomeness of AD&D comes from the modules. When you're playing S1 TOMB OF HORRORS or S4 LOST CAVERNS OF TSOJCONTH you really feel (as a player) that you're hanging it out over the edge. No super-powers are going to save you, only by careful planning and executing that plan well (and some lucky dice rolls!) can you best the DM in the GREAT mods.

 

Ulrick

First Post
The weapon type vs armor type modifiers were played with very briefly then skipped and the games kept running smoothly.

I used those modifiers for an AD&D game. They did slow down combat a little bit. But players liked how the modifiers made each weapon unique. The game took on a more medieval feel. PCs used swords against lightly armored brigands and peasants, and large hacking weapons like 2H swords and halberds against knights and other heavily armored foes.
 

Agamon

Adventurer

As I mentioned earlier, a lot of the awesomeness of AD&D comes from the modules. When you're playing S1 TOMB OF HORRORS or S4 LOST CAVERNS OF TSOJCONTH you really feel (as a player) that you're hanging it out over the edge. No super-powers are going to save you, only by careful planning and executing that plan well (and some lucky dice rolls!) can you best the DM in the GREAT mods.

While I wasn't personally a fan of the puzzle-style modules, I agree with your fundamental point. The 1e adventures really ran the gamut. The Secret of Bone Hill, Ravenloft, Vault of the Drow, Against the Cult of the Reptile God and Tomb of Horrors were all uniquely different experiences that helped make the game fun for everyone.
 

thedungeondelver

Adventurer
While I wasn't personally a fan of the puzzle-style modules, I agree with your fundamental point. The 1e adventures really ran the gamut. The Secret of Bone Hill, Ravenloft, Vault of the Drow, Against the Cult of the Reptile God and Tomb of Horrors were all uniquely different experiences that helped make the game fun for everyone.


They did. Their genius was their adaptability; their...dare I say...modularity.

 

FriarRosing

First Post
All this talk makes me want to try an AD&D game. I ran a Rules Cyclopedia one for a while, but my players found the combat too dull (which was probably mostly my fault--I think I needed more gripping descriptions). I got some AD&D books recently since they were so cheap and I figured they'd be a fun read, and I may crack them open for a game. I may try to get my hands on a classic module and run them through that. I have Against the Giants as a PDF I bought a while back, but Temple of Elemental Evil sounds more interesting. It's a shame all of that PDF nonsense had to go down before I could get a hold of it that way. :-(
 

thedungeondelver

Adventurer
All this talk makes me want to try an AD&D game. I ran a Rules Cyclopedia one for a while, but my players found the combat too dull (which was probably mostly my fault--I think I needed more gripping descriptions). I got some AD&D books recently since they were so cheap and I figured they'd be a fun read, and I may crack them open for a game. I may try to get my hands on a classic module and run them through that. I have Against the Giants as a PDF I bought a while back, but Temple of Elemental Evil sounds more interesting. It's a shame all of that PDF nonsense had to go down before I could get a hold of it that way. :-(

T1-4 THE TEMPLE OF ELEMENTAL EVIL is a tough nut to try and crack your first time out of the gate with AD&D, even with T1. G123 AGAINST THE GIANTS is a more straightforward campaign, and may be better suited to trying out the first time. Regardless, if your players only have second hand (and worse, negative) information on AD&D then have a non-game game session where you sit down and hash out how it all works first. Or get ready to send a lengthy email or letter or whatever to them explaining a lot of things. Assuming they are experienced gamers, or can at least put aside their conceits regarding previous-versus-current rules, then by all means, have at them!

(And remember, if you do play T1-4, stick the knife in up to the hilt and break it off.)
 


Nikosandros

Golden Procrastinator
Nobody makes it past the moathouse without casualties of some kind. :)
I still remember what happened the first party that I run through the module nearly 20 years ago... after a tough fight in the dungeon of the moathouse where one or two characters had died and the rest were wounded, the party inexplicably decided to rest in the dungeon, without posting guards. :confused:

Talk about a short adventure...
 



Lidgar

Legend
Funny, I just started re-reading the ToEE and the preponderance of men-at-arms suddenly struck out - not only at the moathouse, but the entire dungeon. I love all the special weapons as well - like the crossbow the fires four bolts at once, and the shield that fires poison darts....

On another note, I am running a group through the 3.5 version of S1. So far, 4 deaths. It is modified a bit to fit a larger story arc - they need to reach Acererack within 3 days - but deadliness intact...:p
 

Obryn

Hero
My group finally made it into the Temple Dungeon proper last night. Quick sblock for those who might be playing it...

[sblock]
They headed to the area with the pillared hall, harpies, and ghouls. At first things weren't going so well - they had the party's beefy fighter and paladin stuck in the room, while the rest of the group was outside the portcullis.

Fortunately, the Harpies' songs didn't take hold, and they were largely ineffective as a result. So then, we came to the six ghouls... who couldn't get past the paladin's protection aura. They got the portcullis up, the cleric turned all of them, and then they worked on slaughtering the hapless undead. Not without a fight, though - the ghouls managed to paralyze the party's half-orc, and four more ghouls ran out of another nearby door... only to be blocked by the aura, themselves.

Those ghouls ran off, and the party decided to trust in the paladin's holiness and camp out in that room for a bit, waiting an hour or so for the half-orc to get back up. They smartly spiked the door the ghouls had retreated through.

...which was maybe fine in theory, until a pair of ghasts followed by the four ghouls from before exited from an unnoticed secret door and charged right up to the resting party. They won initiative, and the two ghasts charged the paladin. The first paralyzed him, and the second basically bull-rushed him and knocked the poor guy away from the rest of the party...

...which in turn exposed the party's cleric, now outside the circle of protection, along with one other PC. The four ghouls, now with a clear path, attacked the two of them, sadly paralyzing the cleric, who could now only silently pray to Tritherion.

Seeing the writing on the wall, the druid, magic-user, and ranger all ran, leaving the rest of the group to the ghouls' tender mercies, defended only by a charmed boar and a henchman. Since the portcullis was down, they figured the secret door the ghasts came from would be a good escape route. They spent a round or two working on getting the door from that room open, only to find ... that it looped back around to the door they'd spiked shut.

They finally decided to help the rest of the party, who had been hanging on. Because the paralyzed folks were in plate armor, I made a call that the ghouls and ghasts couldn't kill them instantly, but they'd been basically doing a lot of damage every round. The cleric had already been killed, with four ghouls feasting greedily on his marrow. The henchman and boar were still in the fight, but barely. The paladin had 1 HP.

So the druid threw a potted plant he'd been saving for this purpose into the mix, followed with an entangle spell. It wrapped up almost everyone, living, dead, and undead alike. The paladin was dropped to negatives, cured, and managed to live. They were able to kill the ghasts and hid out in the paladin's circle while the ghouls continued to eat the cleric. In a few more rounds, the half-orc fighter was back into the fray, and ghoul slaughter finally commenced.[/sblock]

It was an insane and completely entertaining encounter, from start to finish. One of my favorites, ever. :)

-O
 

thedungeondelver

Adventurer
My group finally made it into the Temple Dungeon proper last night. Quick sblock for those who might be playing it...

[sblock]
They headed to the area with the pillared hall, harpies, and ghouls. At first things weren't going so well - they had the party's beefy fighter and paladin stuck in the room, while the rest of the group was outside the portcullis.

Fortunately, the Harpies' songs didn't take hold, and they were largely ineffective as a result. So then, we came to the six ghouls... who couldn't get past the paladin's protection aura. They got the portcullis up, the cleric turned all of them, and then they worked on slaughtering the hapless undead. Not without a fight, though - the ghouls managed to paralyze the party's half-orc, and four more ghouls ran out of another nearby door... only to be blocked by the aura, themselves.

Those ghouls ran off, and the party decided to trust in the paladin's holiness and camp out in that room for a bit, waiting an hour or so for the half-orc to get back up. They smartly spiked the door the ghouls had retreated through.

...which was maybe fine in theory, until a pair of ghasts followed by the four ghouls from before exited from an unnoticed secret door and charged right up to the resting party. They won initiative, and the two ghasts charged the paladin. The first paralyzed him, and the second basically bull-rushed him and knocked the poor guy away from the rest of the party...

...which in turn exposed the party's cleric, now outside the circle of protection, along with one other PC. The four ghouls, now with a clear path, attacked the two of them, sadly paralyzing the cleric, who could now only silently pray to Tritherion.

Seeing the writing on the wall, the druid, magic-user, and ranger all ran, leaving the rest of the group to the ghouls' tender mercies, defended only by a charmed boar and a henchman. Since the portcullis was down, they figured the secret door the ghasts came from would be a good escape route. They spent a round or two working on getting the door from that room open, only to find ... that it looped back around to the door they'd spiked shut.

They finally decided to help the rest of the party, who had been hanging on. Because the paralyzed folks were in plate armor, I made a call that the ghouls and ghasts couldn't kill them instantly, but they'd been basically doing a lot of damage every round. The cleric had already been killed, with four ghouls feasting greedily on his marrow. The henchman and boar were still in the fight, but barely. The paladin had 1 HP.

So the druid threw a potted plant he'd been saving for this purpose into the mix, followed with an entangle spell. It wrapped up almost everyone, living, dead, and undead alike. The paladin was dropped to negatives, cured, and managed to live. They were able to kill the ghasts and hid out in the paladin's circle while the ghouls continued to eat the cleric. In a few more rounds, the half-orc fighter was back into the fray, and ghoul slaughter finally commenced.[/sblock]

It was an insane and completely entertaining encounter, from start to finish. One of my favorites, ever. :)

-O


That is truly awesome. My party is down on the 2nd level and
[sblock]
nearly got their lunch eaten in the Temple of Evil Air Elementals, then again at the hands of the bugbears on the west side of the dungeon
[/sblock]

You are using the week-to-recover from negative HPs, right?

 

Obryn

Hero
You are using the week-to-recover from negative HPs, right?
I'm using something like it - but not that precisely. I implemented a house-rule that they can go down to -5 with only a day's recovery time, assuming magical healing of some kind. (And, really, they're probably taking at least a day's break after that, anyway.) -6 and -7 take a week of recovery, unless they receive excessive healing - say, a full potion of extra-healing or cure critical wounds or something of that nature.

That makes it easier on the PCs, so to counterbalance, I also decided if they get to -8 or -9, they also get a bonus, lifelong maybe-crippling injury. :D

Also, in regards to your story...
[sblock]My group was about five seconds away from going down the well to Level 2, but ended up taking the stairs at the last minute. Probably saved their bacons, too. Also, I would have cracked up because that'd mean they would have been to level 2 and level 3, without ever really hitting level 1. :)[/sblock]

-O
 


thedungeondelver

Adventurer
I'm using something like it - but not that precisely. I implemented a house-rule that they can go down to -5 with only a day's recovery time, assuming magical healing of some kind. (And, really, they're probably taking at least a day's break after that, anyway.) -6 and -7 take a week of recovery, unless they receive excessive healing - say, a full potion of extra-healing or cure critical wounds or something of that nature.

That makes it easier on the PCs, so to counterbalance, I also decided if they get to -8 or -9, they also get a bonus, lifelong maybe-crippling injury. :D

Also, in regards to your story...
[sblock]My group was about five seconds away from going down the well to Level 2, but ended up taking the stairs at the last minute. Probably saved their bacons, too. Also, I would have cracked up because that'd mean they would have been to level 2 and level 3, without ever really hitting level 1. :)[/sblock]

-O


Harumph, I say to you, you player-coddling softie! -8 or -9? It's -6, whippersnapper!

:)

Oh, and my group has cleaned off the entirety of the first level except for the [sblock]Earth Temple; they don't know how to deal with the Elementals in the room, and were almost wiped out by them but for some quick thinking[/sblock]. They're working through the aforementioned areas of the 2nd now.

Given how the factions of the Temple hate each other, I have deemed that the levels will remain fairly un-populated after being cleaned out. Wandering monsters still apply (patrols from other levels, scavenging, etc.).
 

thedungeondelver

Adventurer

To point up more AD&D awesomeness (and stay with the T1-4 theme that we have going at the moment...):

Sunday's game was great because of the, dare I say, balance of players and characters that were in the mix. Clerics pulling duty as fighting men and as holy healers, thieves saving the party's butt from clever traps, and the wall of steel up front, hacking down the bugbears*.

*=to be fair, one of the thieves pulls double duty as a Ftr/Thf, but it's all good.

 


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