I really don't think it should be called the "ORC license"

CubicsRube

Hero
Supporter
To put another voice in the chamber, i like the name of ORC. It's simple, catchy and evocative of RPGs as a vast majority are fantasy themed. As a marketing tactic it works well.

I don't think 99% of people who watch lord of the rings, play warcraft or d&d connect orcs with racism. And even if they did, using reframing the word as something positive should be encouraged.
 

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The Scythian

Explorer
Though, I think the link between the name of the license somehow affecting the genre of the games that use it to be tenuous. Like, do most people read the OGL in the back of the book? Did the name "OGL" have any effect on the genres within it?
Right. If the ORC does its job, nobody will even know it's there, and the vast majority of people won't care. It's not like people are going to put a big ORC symbol on the front of their products or tout that it's licensed using ORC, because what will really be important will be what the product is compatible with.
 


MGibster

Legend
ORC is a bad name because the hobby needs to move away from its blinding association and allegiance to fantasy games and tropes.
Holy %#%#! This is the best argument ever. That isn't sarcasm you're seeing here either. That's actually an argument I can get behidn. I think it's too late, I think it's going to be called ORC no matter what, but I kind of agree with you here.

Why buy store-brand Coke when you can just get the real thing?
::pepsi has entered the chat.::
 

MGibster

Legend
Some people really don't care about it. Other people are offended that others are feeling offended by it. But orcs are perhaps the most controversial and divisive topic in RPGs in recent years. All the arguments for or against orcs being a dog whistle promotion for thinking in hateful stereotypes really don't matter here right now. But the thing is, we have seen that plenty of people having very strong opinions on orcs as toxic stereotypes that they just won't touch.
The fact that orcs exist in a fantasy setting hasn't ever been a problem, so I'm not seeing why naming the license ORC is going to be a problem. I don't think this is going to be a problem. I don't believe a significant number of people are going to be turned off because they have negative associations with orcs in general. I'm sure someone is going to be upset, but you can't worry about making everyone happy.
 

Alzrius

The EN World kitten
I think @Yora raises a good point.

But I'm going to take that good point and raise a collateral point.

ORC is a bad name because the hobby needs to move away from its blinding association and allegiance to fantasy games and tropes.
To that end, in hopes of making a license that gives tabletop RPGs of all kinds a better image, I propose a different moniker: the Belly Up to the TableTop license! Yes, I'd like a big BUTT license and I cannot lie.
 


aramis erak

Legend
Count me as one more "ORC is good" vote.
Is it lamentable that D&D is so dominant? I guess. But there are so many games readily available that anyone who really wants to play something else can.
The limiting factor is not access to rules, seldom access to dice or cards, but all too often...
the limiting factor is access to people willing to play any given game/setting.
 


MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I only wish they chose boring legal language so we didn't have to be distracted with debates on the political correctness of orcs. Besides, the community will come up with cute alternate names from any initials anyway.

Open Source Gaming License

OSGL

Orcs Slay Gatekeeping Lawyers

There you go. And I'm sure sci-fi TTRPG fans could come up with their own clever names. Needn't be anchored in fantasy genres.
 


Reynard

Legend
Count me as one more "ORC is good" vote.

The limiting factor is not access to rules, seldom access to dice or cards, but all too often...
the limiting factor is access to people willing to play any given game/setting.
Sure. It takes more effort. That doesn't make it impossible.
 

However, there's only one kind of tea here, and I'll die on that hill: If you ask for tea in GA, you're getting cold syrup. Anything else is by special request.
Oh, so true.

Unless I was eating at some kind of chain, where they actually served plain iced tea, I grew accustomed to ordering hot tea and a glass of ice. I remember hearing once when going to my favorite greasy spoon "oh, there's that nice young yankee who wants his northern tea. Here ya go, hon." I was just trying to show my pancreas some mercy.

Fun times!
 


DMZ2112

Chaotic Looseleaf
Trying to haul this back into some semblance of on-topic:

The industry is healthier than it has ever been, AND D&D is more popular than it has ever been. These two things are in no way mutually exclusive.

The dialogue around success in this industry needs reframing. Paizo is an extremely successful TTRPG publisher, and all of their games together make up about 5% of campaigns being run online.

Wizards and D&D is not a meaningful benchmark of market share, especially not right now.

Looking to roleplay more? Don't focus on finding players for a campaign. Focus on building a diverse group of players with complex interests who find playing together more compelling than playing a particular game.
 

MGibster

Legend
I only wish they chose boring legal language so we didn't have to be distracted with debates on the political correctness of orcs. Besides, the community will come up with cute alternate names from any initials anyway.
I suspect this only a debate among a miniscule number of people, mostly online, with an overwhelming number of people not being in the least bit offended.
 


Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Speaking for myself only, I have found it relatively easy to get people to play one-shots (or short "campaigns" - that last no more than 3-4 sessions) of all sorts of games. It's why I've been able to explore so many rules-lite and one-page games, and have created a bunch of my own for home use. None of those is traditional fantasy.

But just like most people, I struggle to sell people on playing other games for anything more than that. Any campaign has to be D&D. I don't know what it is- obviously, it's not a "learning rules" issue because people are fine doing it just for a single game. I just can't get them to commit to a real campaign of anything that isn't D&D/fantasy.
I might be investment. My group and I are heavily invested in D&D. We have tons of books and want to use them. It would be very hard and probably impossible for me to convince them to walk away from that and do something new. Heck, I don't want to walk away from it. The second issue for me and some in my group is time. We only have 1 day to meet and play, so D&D it is. If I had time for a second day of RPG play, I'd be open to trying something new short term like you describe in your first paragraph, and if I liked it I'd be open to a long term campaign. But I don't have the time.
 


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