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5E Is 'Paladin Oathbreaker' the 'Blackguard' of the 5E?

edutrevi

First Post
My main character in 3.5 was a Blackguard in a evil campaign. I love so much playing with chaotic evil characters.
Running out of "heroes saving the world" cliché. ;)
The "Paladin Oathbreaker" of DMG will fit well?
 

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Li Shenron

Legend
Not exactly the same, but Oathbreaker is at least one option for the old Blackguard concept, specifically covering the "fallen to dark side" case.

But a LE/NE/CE Paladin with another Oath falls within the Blackguard concept too, and you can start at 1st level. In some cases, it might even work better, for example if you're undercover and your good-looking spells will help you against being busted.
 


ephemeron

Explorer
But a LE/NE/CE Paladin with another Oath falls within the Blackguard concept too, and you can start at 1st level.
Yeah, 5e has broadened the Paladin archetype quite a bit.

The Oath of Devotion is pretty much the traditional LG paladin, but the Oath of Vengeance -- while written as "Good does not mean Nice" -- would suit a Blackguard after just a little retheming. And an Unseelie take on the Oath of the Ancients could give you whole other flavors of evil.
 



Dragonhelm

Knight of Solamnia
In Dragonlance, there's an evil knighthood called the Knights of Neraka (formerly the Knights of Takhisis). A blackguard would work very well among their numbers. They swear a Blood Oath ("Submit or die!"), so they really aren't an oathbreaker. Yet all it takes is a little reflavoring to use the oathbreaker for this role.
 

I'm pretty sure this subclass is intended exactly to represent the blackguard/anti-paladin angle. I personally can't see using the Oath of Vengeance for it at all.

"Oathbreaker" should be interpreted loosely. It's a perfectly appropriate subclass for someone whose oath is to some sort of evil.
 


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