5.5E Is the 5E player base going to split?

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I agree, in play most people won't care. The real question is, who is going to throw another $200 at a set of core books that, according to many on this board, offer very little actual change in the game? I'm not sure i would do that even if I liked the changes.
If it has new art, a lot of people will buy.
 

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Parmandur

Book-Friend
Bereft as I am of a working crystal ball I cannot lay much on my own predictions here, right? Okay.

My guess is that it won't be so much a split as a lag in people adopting the new books. As folks set in their ways often do, we'll grouse and insist the 5e books are largely fine as they are and didn't need all these changes, but as more and more people take up the new system, most of us crusty old curmudgeons will come around to the new books and settle in to using them. There will, of course, be a few who insist on sticking with the prior system (that always happens, too), but I expect by and large it won't be a big deal.

It isn't fifth edition that so many people have fallen in love with over the past four or five years; it's D&D.
Yeah, there will be a spectrum of responses, but a dramatic split is not necessary.
 



I just bought Monsters ofnthe Multiverse despite owning both previous books, and the art is a major factor. Art is a major Contributor to all my RPG book purchases. Notably, Acquisitions Incorporated and Rick & Morty are the only 5E products I skipped, and art is probably the main reason there.
Huh. I like art, but it really doesn't factor into my purchasing choices beyond wanting to know what something actually looks like. Even that is unnecessary if I already know.
 

Mercurius

Legend
If they incorporate material from previous books, they are essentially re-printing that material. This is not necessarily great for those who own the previous books.
I don't see how it is a problem for those folks. In fact, it is good for them in that it (theoretically) has the updated and complete rules in one book, rather than across multiple supplements, and also benefits those who don't want to buy extra supplements.

Xanathar's expanded on player's options, as did Tasha's, but also had more significant rules additions and adjustments. The 50th PHB would essentially be, "this incorporates the last ten years of 5E development - at least the essentials." That seems like a perfectly reasonable thing to do after ten years. Again, we're not talking three years here. Ten is a long time, especially for D&D.

I mean, should it not do that? No approach is perfect, but incorporating any significant or meaningful changes in the new core rulebooks seems like the best approach to take.
 

dave2008

Legend
Idle curiosity about how folks feel. I don't really have a dog in the race and haven't been paying super close attention to things, but it appears that we are in the early stages of a "renovation" of the 5E rules, and we know we have revised core books coming.

So what I am curious about is how folks feel. Do you think that "5.5" is going to split the 5E player base such that there are 2 camps of 5E players -- 5.0 and 5.5? I know that some people felt that way about 4E essentials, and some folks stuck with 3.0 rather than go to 3.5.

What do you think?

Also, be nice.

EDITED for grammar.
No, I don't think it will cause a split
 

JAMUMU

Justified & Ancient
If it's handled well enough any split should be minor, but there will always be splitters. Just ask the People's Front of Judea.

When 3.5 came out all the DMs and players I knew upgraded to it. I didn't, and continued to run 3rd ed for ages, but I was definitely an outlier.
 




Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
I mean, as with any rules update there will of course be people who don’t make the switch. But they will be a very small minority of the player base. And frankly, a lot of the people who wouldn’t make the change have already moved on from 5e.
 

overgeeked

B/X Known World
By an large, D&D is the best return on investment I have ever seen in entertainment dollars.
This is always an interesting argument.

So, since game books are huge well-springs of entertainment...sometimes literally lasting decades and generations...why do people constantly push for and buy new game books? I mean, I bought a $20 PHB back in 1984 and it's still in good shape. It's perfectly serviceable and the game still plays well enough and I can hack it to my heart's content. So why, since I've already invested in the game, and it's an eternal source of entertainment...why on Earth would I bother buying a newer, more expensive version of the mostly similar game book?
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Except that $60 back in 1986 was over double what it is today.

It's very weird that it's the absolute dollar amount that is some kind of limit and not the purchasing power of that dollar amount. $60 today is 4 people going to the movies. $60 back in 1986 would have paid for around 15 people to go to the movies. Have parents gotten cheaper about paying for their kids entertainment?
It's effective competition between the 3 platform holders keeping prices down compared to the days of the de facto Nintendo monopoly.
 

overgeeked

B/X Known World
See, I don't do visual art at all, so basically anything does the job for me. Words mean much more to me than pictures.
I'm the same. Especially now with the internet and such easy access to world-class art for free. I can find better and more evocative art than WotC would ever put in a book. So why pay them for art?
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Huh. I like art, but it really doesn't factor into my purchasing choices beyond wanting to know what something actually looks like. Even that is unnecessary if I already know.
I mean, I have to want to use it, too, but the art is a significant factor with WotC products, due to yhe high quality of art that scratches my sweet spot.
 


Mercurius

Legend
If it has new art, a lot of people will buy.

That is so weird to me.
It is an aspect of collecting. Meaning, it doesn't make sense from a purely utilitarian point of view, but a lot of folks are also collectors.

You can see this in any number of niche areas. I'm into mechanical pencils and fountain pens. In the mechanical pencil world, the Rotring 600 is one of the most iconic pencils - sort of a "gateway drug" to becoming a mechanical pencil aficionado. Not only does it come in a variety of lead types (0.5, 0.7, 2mm, etc), but also many different colors - and some collector's want at least one of each.

As with watches, a cheap $2 mechanical pencil (or $10 quartz watch) will suffice, but that's not what it is about (from a collector's or aficionado's) perspective. There are mechanical pencils that cost hundreds of dollars, and don't even get me started with fountain pens, which also have a luxury/status component.

Not to mention that there's the factor of aesthetic pleasure (also, in kinesthetic pleasure - the feel of a well-made, cool looking writing instrument in your hand). I bought the Eberron alt cover for $50 at my FLGS not because I'm anti-Amazon (well, I kind of am - but sacrifice my morals for convenience and economics), but because I loved the cover art - to the point that I was willing to spend $20 more on the cover.
 

dave2008

Legend
See, I don't do visual art at all, so basically anything does the job for me. Words mean much more to me than pictures.
I'm a picture is worth a thousand words guy. To be honest, I pay almost no attention to the writing that is not specifically mechanics anymore. I may skim the lore, etc., but I don't really retain much of it. I use these monsters in my world - not theirs. I don't need, nor want, to be told how I should use them.
 

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