D&D 5E It's Dwarfy McDwarferson from the Player's Handbook!

mips42

Adventurer
Overall, I like it. I think I would have liked a better shadow or ground-line to 'attach' her to the ground, though.
Temporarily throwing out the whole 'why did they choose to showcase a pale-skinned dwarf' thing, in my opinion she's slightly too round, especially in the face. I think, if you make the face slightly narrower in the cheeks, you'd be there.
That being said, I would NOT want to be facing that warhammer... Just sayin'.
And, for those who prefer a little browner, ruddier dwarfette (I DARE you to call her that to her face) see this:
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How interesting that the text says the most common skin tones are brown, but the picture is a white person.

3E and 5E dwarves are described as brown or tan skin, tho 4E says mostly same as human. Has anyone ever seen a brown/tan skinned dwarf art from D&D? I can't recall any
 

While being a member of the Cult of Depilation is a perfectly acceptable (if rare) choice for a female dwarf, I'm fairly certain the young lady in the illustration isn't a member -- she looks more like a prepubescent dwarf playing dress-up for Dwarven Combat Training class.
 

Abraxas

Explorer
3E and 5E dwarves are described as brown or tan skin, tho 4E says mostly same as human. Has anyone ever seen a brown/tan skinned dwarf art from D&D? I can't recall any
I've seen a few

78826.jpg
The dwarf on the right is a Forgotten Realms Gold Dwarf.

Dwarf.jpg
The skin (What you can see of it around the eyes and the fingers) of this dwarf, also from Forgotten Realms, is very dark

Dwarf Cleric.jpg
This is the 4E Dwarf cleric

Battle Trickster.jpg
This dwarf is from the Complete Scoundrel

Old Dwarf Young Gnome.jpg
And this is a young gnome and an old dwarf
 

Cheers, so there have been a few. I have always seen Dwarves as 'earth coloured skin', since the Red Box described them that way. But they are mostly depicted white or 'ruddy' - probably from all the ale!
 

Brainwatch

Explorer
I like the art.....The post does look a little awkward to me, but it's only because her hammer is twisted the wrong way. If it were at a 45 degree angle, it would look like she had just finished a swing. Now it looks like an awkward swing. I mean it's possible she's in the twist of the follow-through, but still. Either way, I like that this feels like another move in the direction of "action over poses". Sure, it's definitely a pose. But it's not just her standing there. Look at her shoulders and hips, she's swinging that hammer. And I can tolerate the more "pose" nature of the picture as it's meant to be a representation of the race. So I'm happy.

I look at her pose more that she's in a "ready stance" than finishing a swing. She's staring out the page at her opponent, weapon held ready. She's either about to do a block/parry bringing the weapon quickly from her left to right, immediately into a right to left counter attack. Or if given slightly more time, she'll swing that weapon up over her left shoulder and then down in a crushing overhead swing.

But that's just me.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
When was it "official" Dwarven women had beards? I dont remember it as far back as 2AD&D, which was the earliest I played.

Heck, if you want to get pedantic, the first "official" D&D book had elves with beards (the OD&D illustration). Does that mean all elves should have beards now?

Really, this is a non issue. Beard, no beard, so what? It's good art. People get worked up over the silliest things some times.
 

dd.stevenson

Super KY
This is the kind of art I've been wanting for D&D for the last 20 years.

And, again I really dig the way they've chosen to be representative. I'm not a fan of representation for representation's sake, but this? They're using these underrepresented groups because these underrepresented groups actually belong in the picture. Like, if you were to replace the female dwarf with a male, or the black dude on the front page with a white guy, I think the picture would actually be poorer for that.

That's the kind of representation I can get 100% behind. I hope the entire 5E line turns out like this.
 
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mcmillan

Adventurer
While the text description makes me think a darker skin would have been better, my first thought when I saw the picture was it looked like Violet from Rat Queens, which I don't mind.
 

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variant

Adventurer
The skin tone descriptions in 3e and now 5e never made any sense. Where do they get the concept that most dwarves have a brown skin tone? Just from a fantasy historical perspective it's wrong. I don't think there have ever been any dwarves with brown skin tone in D&D novels or any other fantasy novels, if there are it's far and few between.

Also, what about blond haired dwarves? They seem to be at least as common as red haired ones, if not more so, an example off the top of my head is Ivan Bouldershoulder. Dwarves are from Nordic mythology, why is the description excluding blond hair of all things?

The text just seems to be diversity for diversity sake with the added red hair pale skin thrown in because Bruenor Battlehammer has red hair with pale skin.
 

Dwarves were described as earth/tan/etc tone in the Holmes Basic, BX Moldvay, BECMI red box, and 1E MM. They were downgraded to ruddy in 2E PHB they are described as deep tan or light brown in the MC.

It is not a new thing but it is weird how the game and fiction/art do not tie in often.
 

variant

Adventurer
Dwarves were described as earth/tan/etc tone in the Holmes Basic, BX Moldvay, BECMI red box, and 1E MM. They were downgraded to ruddy in 2E PHB they are described as deep tan or light brown in the MC.

It is not a new thing but it is weird how the game and fiction/art do not tie in often.

Just wondering, but how is being ruddy a downgrade?

I was only familiar with 2e. The earlier description of them probably came from Gygax's hatred of all things Tolkein. The authors of fantasy fiction don't have such hatred or need to be different from Tolkein, so they describe dwarves how they have always known dwarves to be in fantasy.
 
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GX.Sigma

Adventurer
The skin tone descriptions in 3e and now 5e never made any sense. Where do they get the concept that most dwarves have a brown skin tone? Just from a fantasy historical perspective it's wrong. I don't think there have ever been any dwarves with brown skin tone in D&D novels or any other fantasy novels, if there are it's far and few between.

Also, what about blond haired dwarves? They seem to be at least as common as red haired ones, if not more so, an example off the top of my head is Ivan Bouldershoulder. Dwarves are from Nordic mythology, why is the description excluding blond hair of all things?
According to my Wikipedia research, in Norse mythology, the term "Dvergar" (Dwarves) was interchangeable with "Svartalfar" (Dark Elves)--"svart" literally meaning "dark-skinned."
 


jbear

First Post
I think the art is gorgeous. I am not seeing any awkwardness in her pose either. She is just bracing a heavy hammer ready to rip into action if needs be in my opinion. Love it. I am definitely going to show this to the dwarven cleric in our group. I am certain she will love it.
 

pemerton

Legend
"Dwarven skin ranges from deep brown to a paler hue tinged with red, but the most common shades are light brown or deep tan, like certain tones of earth."

White is not "a paler hue tinged with red."
Agreed.

How interesting that the text says the most common skin tones are brown, but the picture is a white person.
There's no problem with showing a pale dwarf. The problem is when the text says "most dwarves are brown," then then all the dwarves they show are pale.
Dwarves were described as earth/tan/etc tone in the Holmes Basic, BX Moldvay, BECMI red box, and 1E MM.
3E and 5E dwarves are described as brown or tan skin, tho 4E says mostly same as human. Has anyone ever seen a brown/tan skinned dwarf art from D&D? I can't recall any
I've also noticed over the (many) years that illustrations of dwarves and gnomes frequently depart from the way they are described in those earlier books, as primarily dark-skinned. It's a little odd that the tradition is continuing in 5e.

Tolkin never said Dwarven women had beards, if fact, he never even mentioned them.
Tolkien did mention them, in Appendix A to LotR. He describes them as indistinguishable in appearance from dwarf men. This is what generates the implication that they are bearded, or at least very masculine in their appearance. (Contrastingly, elf men are often characterised as very feminine in their appearance, although not to the extent that they are indistinguishable from elf women.)

I haven't got my copy of the DMG ready to hand, but I think Gygax describes dwarven women as bearded in that book.
 

variant

Adventurer
According to my Wikipedia research, in Norse mythology, the term "Dvergar" (Dwarves) was interchangeable with "Svartalfar" (Dark Elves)--"svart" literally meaning "dark-skinned."

It is only speculation from some scholars that think the svartalfar and dvergar were the same thing. Other scholars disagree and speculate that they are two distinct peoples and even others think svartalfar, dokkalfr, and dvergar were all distinct.

Also, 'svart' doesn't mean literally dark skinned, it means literally 'black, dark, or dirty'.
 
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