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Yaarel

He Mage
I also suggest dropping the d20 as a randomizer in favor of 3d6. Gives a nice bell curve.
Heh, that hurts.

I found the d20 (5%) to be the perfect amount of chance resolution.

For example, adding a +1 may or may not be worth the effort to get the bonus, but +2 is definitely worth it. The 5% is right on that threshold.


One time, I created a system of flipping coins. And the more coins, the more likelihood of success. But after all the math and calculations to calibrate this system, I realized that the end result was roughly equivalent to a d20. That is when my respect for the d20 soared.
 

Haplo781

Legend
Heh, that hurts.

I found the d20 (5%) to be the perfect amount of chance resolution.

For example, adding a +1 may or may not be worth the effort to get the bonus, but +2 is definitely worth it. The 5% is right on that threshold.


One time, I created a system of flipping coins. And the more coins, the more likelihood of success. But after all the math and calculations to calibrate this system, I realized that the end result was roughly equivalent to a d20. That is when my respect for the d20 soared.
It's too swingy and random. 3d6 gives you a normal distribution where very high and very low outcomes are far less likely.

And then you replace the advantage/disadvantage binary with "roll an extra d6 and keep the highest/lowest 3; these cancel each other out but stack with themselves." It's extremely elegant.

You can also do a "something good happens for each 6/something bad happens for each 1, even if they're dropped" a la DFG Star Wars Threats and Advantages.
 

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It's too swingy and random. 3d6 gives you a normal distribution where very high and very low outcomes are far less likely.

And then you replace the advantage/disadvantage binary with "roll an extra d6 and keep the highest/lowest 3; these cancel each other out but stack with themselves." It's extremely elegant.

You can also do a "something good happens for each 6/something bad happens for each 1, even if they're dropped" a la DFG Star Wars Threats and Advantages.

This is what makes GURPS great for distinguishing between being who is good and who is bad at something, and why Advantage was a such a neat mechanic.
 

Yaarel

He Mage
It's too swingy and random. 3d6 gives you a normal distribution where very high and very low outcomes are far less likely.

And then you replace the advantage/disadvantage binary with "roll an extra d6 and keep the highest/lowest 3; these cancel each other out but stack with themselves." It's extremely elegant.

You can also do a "something good happens for each 6/something bad happens for each 1, even if they're dropped" a la DFG Star Wars Threats and Advantages.
I understand the statistics of 3d6, and the appeal of a bell curve.

But at higher levels, when one is adding +5, +10, +15, the bell curve becomes less and less noticeable. The flat d20 meshes better with the 5% increments.

The advantage of a d20 roll is it is both simple and effective.



That said, there are many ways to go about chance outcomes.

I find Cortex Prime intriguing. It uses d4, d6, d8, d10, d12, and (rarely) d20. Each ability uses a separate die, the bigger die succeeds more often, add multiple dice when more than one ability applies, and higher levels have more abilities with bigger dice.
 

p_johnston

Adventurer
I understand the statistics of 3d6, and the appeal of a bell curve.

But at higher levels, when one is adding +5, +10, +15, the bell curve becomes less and less noticeable. The flat d20 meshes better with the 5% increments.

The advantage of a d20 roll is it is both simple and effective.



That said, there are many ways to go about chance outcomes.

I find Cortex Prime intriguing. It uses d4, d6, d8, d10, d12, and (rarely) d20. Each ability uses a separate die, the bigger die succeeds more often, add multiple dice when more than one ability applies, and higher levels have more abilities with bigger dice.
So as someone who does prefer 3d6 (in addition to the bell curve i think it gives more room to play with in terms of mechanics) i understand why the d20 is standard.
The probability is easy, the range is wide enough to have a variety of results/targets, the resolution is quick.
 

One time, I created a system of flipping coins. And the more coins, the more likelihood of success. But after all the math and calculations to calibrate this system, I realized that the end result was roughly equivalent to a d20. That is when my respect for the d20 soared.
Part of me wants to read that system.
 


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