Dragonlance Lunar Sorcery: A Preview from Shadow of the Dragon Queen

WotC has posted a preview from the upcoming Shadow of the Dragon Queen on D&D Beyond, diving into the Lunary Sorcery subclass.

lunar-socerer-featured.jpg


Traditionally magic in Krynn has been represented by the Wizards of High Sorcery, who owe their allegiance to one of the black, red, or white moons (and gods) of magic. Sorcerers weren't around in D&D when Dragonlance was created.

Lunar Sorcerers also draw power from the moons, based on the moon's phase (Full, New, Crescent). You choose the phase each day (though at later levels you can do so more often). The subclass gets a lot of spells (15 additional spells!)


 
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Blue Orange

Gone to Texas
Didn't they do some weird thing for 3rd edition where all the magic went away and Raistlin's nephew learned 'the new magic' or something?

Anyway, looks like a fun, flavorful subclass. ;)
 


Didn't they do some weird thing for 3rd edition where all the magic went away and Raistlin's nephew learned 'the new magic' or something?

Anyway, looks like a fun, flavorful subclass. ;)
3rd edition had both wizards (the three robed orders of high sorcery) and sorcerers (primal sorcery, aka the magic discovered in the 5th age)
 



Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I wish WotC had the guts to just say hey Dragonlance doesn't have Sorcerers. Not try to force every option into every world.
It doesn't matter to me. To me classes are just game constructs, not fiction in the world. People don't introduce themselves as 'fighters' and 'barbarians' and 'rogues'. A 'wizard of high sorcery' is somebody who can do magic and is a member of the order. What rules elements are used to make that concept mechanically are behind the scenes.
 

It doesn't matter to me. To me classes are just game constructs, not fiction in the world. People don't introduce themselves as 'fighters' and 'barbarians' and 'rogues'. A 'wizard of high sorcery' is somebody who can do magic and is a member of the order. What rules elements are used to make that concept mechanically are behind the scenes.
yes, 100% I hate when people just use the out of game class like it's a ingame label, BUT there is a difference between "My magic is inborn because I have dragon blood" and "I studied to learn this" and "I made a pact with a celestial" I think what he means is he wants (and I would assume this would go for all pre 3e settings) not to add the pact or blood line story element.

I disagree just becuse I love warlorck and sorcerer and LOVE them being in the setting, but I don't think it's the name that bugs him
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
yes, 100% I hate when people just use the out of game class like it's a ingame label, BUT there is a difference between "My magic is inborn because I have dragon blood" and "I studied to learn this" and "I made a pact with a celestial" I think what he means is he wants (and I would assume this would go for all pre 3e settings) not to add the pact or blood line story element.
This. The wizard class might refer to himself as a sorcerer or warlock in the fiction, but he's a guy who learns magic from a book. Sorcerers and warlocks the classes, regardless of what they call themselves in the fiction, would probably be considered heathen wizards by the wizards of high sorcery and hunted down.
 

This. The wizard class might refer to himself as a sorcerer or warlock in the fiction, but he's a guy who learns magic from a book. Sorcerers and warlocks the classes, regardless of what they call themselves in the fiction, would probably be considered heathen wizards by the wizards of high sorcery and hunted down.
intresting... is this a quick thought or have you given any consideration to it? I can see plenty of reason to test sorcerers and warlocks
 

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