D&D General Maps, Maps, Maps! Dungeons, Ruins, Caverns, Temples, and more... aka Where Dyson Dumps His Maps.


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Temple of the Divinity in Copper

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There are many temples to lost and fallen deities and heroes cut into the cliffs around the Desert of the Gods. Few find it worth the effort to brave the purple sandworms and other terrors of the desert in order to explore these old structures...

But treasure maps can be found that lead to secret alcoves and storage spaces in lost temples to forgotten gods.

This temple was to some austere faith that did not keep much in the way of catechisms or other indications of their beliefs. Carvings are of complex intertwined geometrics, and tapestries follow similar themes. This makes the great stone statue in the main temple stand out even more - the massive representation of a robed humanoid figure holding a spear in one hand and four spheres stacked into a small tetrahedron in the other.

The statue was once plated in copper, and bits of it remain where it had been hammered into holes and purchases in the stonework. The name (Temple of the Divinity in Copper) is deeply cut into the stonework lintels over each of the entrance arches into the temple from the hostile desert beyond.

The central section of the map is the main level, and has stairs down to part of the lower level. The stairs both lead to the same section of the lower level (lower right side of the lower level map).

The tall-ceilinged hexagonal temple room had stairs up to the upper level on both walls, but they long ago collapsed (with some sections appearing to have been destroyed with intent). Access to the upper level now is either by means of flight or levitation, climbing the massive statue of the Divinity in Copper (and suffering whatever curse such an indignity might bring), or via the secret chambers on the lowest level which have a long set of switchback stairs leading between them and the upper level.

The lower chambers are much more indicative that this was not just a place of worship, but once housed multiple followers and/or administrators of the faith. Tables, benches, and shelves remain, although whatever books and paperwork they held are long gone.

But a treasure map might tell one what flagstone to move to find a secret storage space, or what shapes to trace in the geometric carvings to open a small magical hole where treasures are still kept to this day.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 10,200 pixels (34 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10‘ squares) – so resizing the image to 2,380 pixels or 4,760 pixels wide, respectively.

 

The Deep Sepulchre

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You enter the dark cavern with lantern in hand, seeking treasure or clues to the ancient mystery of this place. The air is damp and cold, and all you can hear is the burbling of the ice cold stream as it descends into the darkness. Near the entrance to the caverns is a sealed stone portal, the archway framing it carved with crude runes likely in a goblinoid tongue.

Descending along with the stream into the depths of the cavern, there are more signs of inhabitants - an ancient statue like the stone portal, and a more recent wooden “bridge” to cross the stream. But also a stench. A horrifying stench that clings to the inside of the nose and refuses to let go - the stench of the troglodytes that have moved in here, taking up the side caves as their personal lairs - breaching the highest of the crypts on the first level by the bridge over the stream and despoiling the contents as they turn it into a lair.

Sneaking past these foul creatures, the twisting cavern descends deeper, spiralling down into the depths before finally arriving at another stone portal, opening into the ancient sepulchre beneath.

The sepulchre contains a number of smallish and crude stone sarcophagi and many cobwebs. The walls, crypts, and sarcophagi all bear similar runes to the archway and portal above. Prying one open as quietly as possible, and it becomes immediately apparent why the troglodytes leave this lowest chamber alone - the goblins entombed here are not resting peacefully and instead their spirits come crawling through their stone encasements to claw at the souls of interlopers.

Rushing up the stairs to escape the sepulchre brings you back to the first portal, still sealed, and the spirits of the goblins pursue… in the dark, desperately trying to open the sealed stone doorway, the shadows of the goblins finally attack.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 7,200 pixels (24 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10‘ squares) – so resizing the image to 1,680 pixels or 3,360 pixels wide, respectively.

 







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