D&D General Maps, Maps, Maps! Dungeons, Ruins, Caverns, Temples, and more... aka Where Dyson Dumps His Maps.

Hey @Dyson Logos what is the most "metal" map you have ever made? (Available for commercial use)
Have you investigated the Astral Sanatorium of the Mad Mi-Go Brain Cluster?

 

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Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
Dyson, are you taking a different approach with recent maps? I really like them and am very likely to use them in the next few months in my games -- they're smaller, often easier to parse on VTT -- but they feel like you're in a different mode than some of your more complex maps of the recent past.
 

Dyson, are you taking a different approach with recent maps? I really like them and am very likely to use them in the next few months in my games -- they're smaller, often easier to parse on VTT -- but they feel like you're in a different mode than some of your more complex maps of the recent past.
I generally only do a few really complex maps a year. They are fun to draw and get a LOT of attention, but aren't as gameable.

Plus I've been doing a lot of work for WotC, and they like full page maps at 6 squares per inch or tighter... so I end up making a LOT of maps that are about 4 times the size of my usual work.
 

Lordling's Hall

Lordlings-Hall.jpg


The great hall of a minor lordling on the distant frontier, this hall is big enough that you won’t mistake it for a farmer’s house, but not so big that it immediately stands out when you enter town.

A large covered porch greets travellers and petitioners, and through the double doors one arrives immediately in the great hall with rooms off to the sides and another covered porch in the back.

Stairs on each side of the great hall lead up to the two upper levels of the structure - on the right is the lordling’s suite (with a chamber for their advisor on the south side, and their personal chamber on the north side) and on the left are his top military aide’s suite and accompanying chambers.

The front rooms attached to the great hall are bunk rooms for men-at-arms and hangers-on, with kitchen & scullery on the right and a library and conference room on the left when discussions need to be moved away from the more public great hall.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 14,400 pixels (48 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for the recommended 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for 10′ squares) – so resizing it to either 3,360 pixels wide or 6,720 pixels wide, respectively.

 

Index Card Dungeon – Surface Ruins 1

Index-Card-Dungeon-Surface-Ruins-1.jpg


Old ruins of a hilltop keep conceal a pair of entrances into the extensive dungeons and caves beneath. A small group of gnoll raiders have taken temporary shelter here, but have not enjoyed what they’ve run into beneath and thus stick to the ruins.

This is the first of ten index card-sized dungeon maps that all connect together. Each is designed to fit on a traditional 3 x 5 index card (at six squares per inch), and you can write up any notes about the level on the reverse of the card. The first half of the set will be posted this month and the second half next month. (And unlike the Dungeon23 project, all ten maps of this set have been drawn, so we’ll get the whole set by the end of next month).

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,000 pixels (30 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10′ squares) – so resizing it to either 2,100 pixels wide or 4,200 pixels wide, respectively.

 

Index Card Dungeon – Entrances 1

Index-Card-Dungeon-Entrances-1.jpg


Beneath the ruined keep are caves and dungeons, intertwined in the stones. These portions of the dungeons are in poor shape, partly collapsed and a reminder of the ruins above. A small number of gnolls have taken up the first caves for protection against the elements, but will not proceed further. The dungeons on the other hand are clearly marked by the gnolls above as dangerous – the door at the base of the stairs bearing a large gnoll handprint in dried blood, and the chamber beyond being patrolled by two zombie gnolls, animated by the foulness beneath.

This is the second of ten index card-sized dungeon maps that all connect together. Each is designed to fit on a traditional 3 x 5 index card (at six squares per inch), and you can write up any notes about the level on the reverse of the card. The first half of the set will be posted this month and the second half next month. (And unlike the Dungeon23 project, all ten maps of this set have been drawn, so we’ll get the whole set by the end of next month).

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,000 pixels (30 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10′ squares) – so resizing it to either 2,100 pixels wide or 4,200 pixels wide, respectively.

 

Index Card Dungeon – Caves 1

Index-Card-Dungeon-Caves-1.jpg


Beyond the entrance cavern, one descends deeper into the earth into rapidly increasing humidity and the sounds of dripping water. This section of narrow caves is set around a small underground “lake” (more of a pond, really) that has almost no appreciable current – water flows slowly into the cave from the shallows map to the south and drains out via small cracks in the stones.

The caverns immediately to the west of the entrances point were once used as a camp or lair by some humanoids, and while their mouldy bedrolls remain, the remaining denizens have long ago been reduced to skeletons.

This map connects to the Entrances 1 map to the north, Shallows 1 map via both southern access, down to Dungeons 3, and up to both the Tunnels 1 map and Dungeons 3 map.

This is the third of ten index card-sized dungeon maps that all connect together. Each is designed to fit on a traditional 3 x 5 index card (at six squares per inch), and you can write up any notes about the level on the reverse of the card. The first half of the set is being posted this month and the second half next month. (And unlike the Dungeon23 project, all ten maps of this set have been drawn, so we’ll get the whole set by the end of next month).

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,000 pixels (30 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10′ squares) – so resizing it to either 2,100 pixels wide or 4,200 pixels wide, respectively.

 

Index Card Dungeon – Dungeons 1

Index-Card-Dungeon-Dungeons-1.jpg


The first section of the dungeons under the old keep are in exceptionally bad shape with multiple collapses and cave-ins where the upper structures have failed over the years. This section is dominated by three points of interest – a large hall with a raised centre with five massive pillars reaching from floor to ceiling; a cavern that was here before that the builders decided to keep but smoothed out a “bridge” across the rough floor; and a high-ceilinged side room dominated by a 17 foot bronze-plated but almost perfectly smooth monolith.

This map connects to the entrances 1 map to the top, to the tunnels 1 and caves 1 maps below and to the right, and to the dungeons 2 map below on the left.

This is the fourth of ten index card-sized dungeon maps that all connect together. Each is designed to fit on a traditional 3 x 5 index card (at six squares per inch), and you can write up any notes about the level on the reverse of the card. The first half of the set is being posted this month and the second half next month. (And unlike the Dungeon23 project, all ten maps of this set have been drawn, so we’ll get the whole set by the end of next month).

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,000 pixels (30 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10′ squares) – so resizing it to either 2,100 pixels wide or 4,200 pixels wide, respectively.

 

Index Card Dungeon – Dungeons 2

Index-Card-Dungeon-Dungeons-2.jpg


Deeper into the dungeons under the old keep things become a little less damaged by age and abuse. This level has a few areas that show where the architecture and masonry have failed to resist the pressures of time, but no extensive cave-ins and collapsed areas as we find above. This level is comprised of larger chambers than above, and is primarily home to old traps and supernatural guardians tasked with defending the area and resetting the traps. The central room is a two-story affair, with stairs leading down a central column to the level below.

Entry to this level is from the stairs under the pillared hall of Dungeons Map 1, or from the lower levels of Dungeons Map 3.

This is the fifth of ten index card-sized dungeon maps that all connect together. Each is designed to fit on a traditional 3 x 5 index card (at six squares per inch), and you can write up any notes about the level on the reverse of the card. This completes the first half of the set – the second half will be posted next month.

The 1200 dpi versions of the map were drawn at a scale of 300 pixels per square and are 9,000 pixels (30 squares) wide. To use this with a VTT you would need to resize the squares to either 70 pixels (for 5′ squares) or 140 pixels (for the recommended 10′ squares) – so resizing it to either 2,100 pixels wide or 4,200 pixels wide, respectively.

 

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