Marriage Vow wording question- "Till Death Do You Part" in a world with Resurrection magic.

RUMBLETiGER

Visitor
I want to pick your collective brains about a precise wording problem.


I am currently playing a LN Tiefling Wizard who is all about contractual agreements like his devil ancestors. He is currently engaged to be married to another PC, and I'm trying to figure out a part of his written up marital covenant.


How do you, with words, capture the spirit of "till death do we part" lifelong commitment, in a world with resurrection magic? It is very likely that, in combat a, "died, Breath of Life cast that round, keep going" or "died, Raise Dead cast 2 days later" situation might happen and then "oops, loophole, guess we don't have to be married anymore". While at the same time, if "it's been 2 years, He's not coming back, you can move on" is still a reasonable way this could play out.


How might an agreement be written to maintain the marriage within the time span of resurrection magic could be used? Including some reasonable expectation that the spouse would at least try to pursue the option to bring the other back?

The marriage is a political move, the PC's have recently been made nobles by the king, and 2 PC's figured they'd have more power married than individually. This is not a romantic union. The bride-to-be is a LE Tiefling Wizard, so contractual agreement without loopholes would be super important.

If it matters, this is in a Pathfinder game.
 

Legatus_Legionis

< BLAH HA Ha ha >
Not being familiar with how Pathfinder deals with it, but...

according to AD&D, page 298, 1995, TSR.

... The creature can have been dead up to 10 years per level of the priest casting the spell. Thus, a 19th-level priest can resurrect the bones of a creature dead up to 190 years...
So having a time frame in the document is a must.

ie. "If I am not raised from the dead/resurrected within X-years (or called a mourning period if you want) my full WILL then comes into effect with regards to division of property/goods/etc. The marriage agreement is over/you can legally marry another/move on with your life."

But then, how to enforce the "try at all cost to bring me back to the land of the living"...

What if one's spouse has no desire to resurrect you?
What if your henchmen has no desire to have you resurrected?
What if it is because of them directly/indirectly caused your death in the first place?
 

RUMBLETiGER

Visitor
I appreciate the reminder for duration of how long the spells can be used.

As for enforcement, that is a separate thing and not an issue considered here. These are two strongly Lawful characters who will stick to what they signed on principle, even if they dislike it. Any refusal would occur before signing the agreement, but once signed, there will be internal motivation to live up to the letter of the agreement because that is how we are playing our PCs.
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad hair day
This is a wonderful question for your setting, since it has likely already come up. It also affects inheritance, passing of titles, and the like. "Hey, I'm back after being dead 24 years. Now give me back all my money and magic items. And what do you mean you're now Baron? That's me!"

So, the cop-out answer is to ask your DM - if you are doing a political marriage that means that there are titles and such that will likely move on at permanent death.

However, it's likely your DM hasn't planned that out - I know I hadn't when I got hit with an inheritance question in a game I ran. Here's how I worked it out for one kingdom, paraphrased. It had more to do with inheritance, but since they are related it might grant ideas.

The period of mourning for nobility shall be a year and a day. During this time the titles and authority pass on provisionally to an "Acting XX" (or Regent if required). At the end of the time the person is considered legally dead and the Will shall be executed. Commoners (including the new "Merchant class") have a mourning period of three days, and need not work during it.

If at any time during the mourning period the person returns, either incorrectly determined as dead or returned, they may step back into their life. For nobles, an Ordeal of Questioning by their direct Leige or the Church of XX is required to make sure this is truly the person.

After the mourning period, the person in the eyes of the Law and The King. If they return after this period they are not considered to be their original entity, and have no rights to what they had while alive. This does not stop them from remarrying their widow or otherwise attempting to return to their previous life at the will of those involved, but they are still considered someone new.

Undead, even free-willed, are not considered the person in the eyes of the Law and The King.
 

Bobble

Villager
How do you, with words, capture the spirit of "till death do we part" lifelong commitment, in a world with resurrection magic?
Considering that for 99.999% of the population "resurrection magic" is not a factor I doubt there would be real impetus to change the wording you are worried about.
 

RUMBLETiGER

Visitor
The period of mourning for nobility shall be a year and a day. During this time the titles and authority pass on provisionally to an "Acting XX" (or Regent if required). At the end of the time the person is considered legally dead and the Will shall be executed. Commoners (including the new "Merchant class") have a mourning period of three days, and need not work during it.

If at any time during the mourning period the person returns, either incorrectly determined as dead or returned, they may step back into their life. For nobles, an Ordeal of Questioning by their direct Leige or the Church of XX is required to make sure this is truly the person.

After the mourning period, the person in the eyes of the Law and The King. If they return after this period they are not considered to be their original entity, and have no rights to what they had while alive. This does not stop them from remarrying their widow or otherwise attempting to return to their previous life at the will of those involved, but they are still considered someone new.

Undead, even free-willed, are not considered the person in the eyes of the Law and The King.
This is good, gives me a framework. Thank you.
 

RUMBLETiGER

Visitor
Considering that for 99.999% of the population "resurrection magic" is not a factor I doubt there would be real impetus to change the wording you are worried about.
While I understand you are speaking for the general population, this is specifically for one LN contract-loving Tiefling Wizard PC to another LE, Tiefling Wizard PC in a state run, very public wedding with characters who very likely will encounter dying and coming back. So we are the 0.001%.
 

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