5E Medicine Checks

Ashrym

Adventurer
Medicine is used rarely enough I don't see much on it. I would like to see and encourage more use. I listed what I could find.


DC 5
  • stabilize / revive a drowning creature
  • determine obvious cause of death
DC 10
  • determine if a patient is safe to move
  • stabilize a dying creature
  • deliver a baby with complications
  • diagnose starvation, dehydration, or madness
  • diagnose an illness
  • determine time and cause of death with multiple visible marks
DC 15
  • determine time and cause of death with no visible marks
  • save mother with a complicated delivery
  • blood spatter analysis
  • safely remove an impaled object from a creature
  • analyze container contents for poison (I'm not sure I agree with this one)
DC 20
  • remove Slaad control gem while incapacitated
Varies
  • staunch bleeding (DC=save DC)
  • treat poison
  • treat disease
  • identify remains

Are there other published uses I'm missing, and what uses have you used?
 

Ashrym

Adventurer
AL, various campaign books (Undermountain had several checks), PHB, monster manual, and DMG. Generally it is real world medicine applications, anatomy, and forensics.

5e just has random medicine checks with no central rules, lol.
 

robus

Lowcountry Low Roller
Surely including situations in your adventures that require medical attention and have consequences for failure is the best way to increase use of this particular skill? And it does seem like something that would be more prevalent in a gritty campaign rather than typical 5e fantasy excursion.
 

Ashrym

Adventurer
@robus Magical healing almost always precedence. Some of the medicine uses take too long to be relevant. Treating a festering wound in the DMG requires 1 check ever 24 hours until 10 successes, for example.

EDIT; it works great in gritty or low magic campaigns. I'm hoping for more mainstream use like other skills.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
AL, various campaign books (Undermountain had several checks), PHB, monster manual, and DMG. Generally it is real world medicine applications, anatomy, and forensics.

5e just has random medicine checks with no central rules, lol.
Thanks thought so. Didnt think the PHB/DMG was that in depth.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
5e just has random medicine checks with no central rules, lol.
I mean, that’s kinda how all checks work in 5e. Instead of lists of specific tasks and DCs like in 3e, 5e relies on DM adjudication. Based on what the player wants to accomplish and how their character goes about it, the DM describes the results (calling for a check and setting the DC if necessary to resolve uncertainty in the outcome.)
 

Ashrym

Adventurer
I mean, that’s kinda how all checks work in 5e. Instead of lists of specific tasks and DCs like in 3e, 5e relies on DM adjudication. Based on what the player wants to accomplish and how their character goes about it, the DM describes the results (calling for a check and setting the DC if necessary to resolve uncertainty in the outcome.)
I think this is one of those skills most players look at the lack of information in the PHB and don't know what they might try. A list of what has been done to gauge from may help them.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
I think this is one of those skills most players look at the lack of information in the PHB and don't know what they might try.
This is just my opinion, and it’s a bit of a controversial one, but if the player is thinking of what to try in terms of what their skills are and what those skills can do, they’re going about things backwards. They should thinking in terms of what they want to accomplish and what their character might do to try and achieve that goal. Let the DM worry about whether or not that task requires a check, and if so what kind.

A list of what has been done to gauge from may help them.
I do think a list like this is useful. I just think it’s better as a DM tool to help setting appropriate DCs, rather than a player tool to allow them choose actions from a menu.
 

neogod22

Explorer
@robus Magical healing almost always precedence. Some of the medicine uses take too long to be relevant. Treating a festering wound in the DMG requires 1 check ever 24 hours until 10 successes, for example.

EDIT; it works great in gritty or low magic campaigns. I'm hoping for more mainstream use like other skills.
Magical healing usually isn't as available for common folk. The PHB prices goods and services in GP which may seem cheap until you realize that the currency most people deal in is SP. Then you realize how expensive things really are in the D&D Worlds.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
To put it in a real would perspective, imagine 1 CP is equal to $1.00.
That’s a bit of an under-estimation. An unskilled laborer makes a silver a day, and a copper is a 10th of a silver. 10 dollars a day is far less than unskilled labor will make you, at least in America. Minimum wage varies by state, but $10 an hour is closer to the mark, if a bit lowballed. If you figure an 8 hour day, that’d put a silver at $80 and a copper at $8.
 

Ashrym

Adventurer
This is just my opinion, and it’s a bit of a controversial one, but if the player is thinking of what to try in terms of what their skills are and what those skills can do, they’re going about things backwards. They should thinking in terms of what they want to accomplish and what their character might do to try and achieve that goal. Let the DM worry about whether or not that task requires a check, and if so what kind.
That method does fit in with preplanned adventures. That's why the DC's are already listed in various campaign adventures. It's typical because no one follows the adventures though, lol.

I don't think DM's necessarily have a good guide on matching up the DC's either so guidelines help us too, ;)

Magical healing usually isn't as available for common folk. The PHB prices goods and services in GP which may seem cheap until you realize that the currency most people deal in is SP. Then you realize how expensive things really are in the D&D Worlds.
It's not the common folk I'm worried about. NPC's have the skill already and commoners use it. PC's don't use it and because they don't use it they don't take, then they are even less likely to try and use it. Building into a more mainstream skill for PC's is where I want to go that that's the help I'm looking for. :)
 

neogod22

Explorer
That method does fit in with preplanned adventures. That's why the DC's are already listed in various campaign adventures. It's typical because no one follows the adventures though, lol.

I don't think DM's necessarily have a good guide on matching up the DC's either so guidelines help us too, ;)



It's not the common folk I'm worried about. NPC's have the skill already and commoners use it. PC's don't use it and because they don't use it they don't take, then they are even less likely to try and use it. Building into a more mainstream skill for PC's is where I want to go that that's the help I'm looking for. :)
If they don't use it, they don't use it. That's judt how some groups roll. As a DM, you can always have a medicine check tied to the success of a healing spell.
 

Ashrym

Adventurer
If they don't use it, they don't use it. That's judt how some groups roll. As a DM, you can always have a medicine check tied to the success of a healing spell.
I'm not trying to force it's use. I'm trying to flesh it out so that it has similar appeal to other skills. Right now it's a situational information skill for examining bodies and a non-competitor for other healing aspects of the game.

Consider this a brainstorming exercise. ;)
 

neogod22

Explorer
That’s a bit of an under-estimation. An unskilled laborer makes a silver a day, and a copper is a 10th of a silver. 10 dollars a day is far less than unskilled labor will make you, at least in America. Minimum wage varies by state, but $10 an hour is closer to the mark, if a bit lowballed. If you figure an 8 hour day, that’d put a silver at $80 and a copper at $8.
But that's only in the US. In most 3rd world countries, $10/day is about right.
This is why they think everyone in America is rich.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
But that's only in the US. In most 3rd world countries, $10/day is about right.
This is why they think everyone in America is rich.
Sure, but the entire point of the analogy is to frame the buying power of fantasy currency in terms of our experience. I doubt any of us posting on ENworld live in 3rd world contries working for $10 a day.
 

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