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5E Mythic Odysseys of Theros Reviews

Did you, or will you, buy Mythic Odysseys of Theros


  • Total voters
    129
Hey, just wanted to create a thread for people to give review on everything and anything contained inside MOoT (I love the acronym, by the way). My favorite change in this whole book is the fact that Tritons get Darkvision. The lore and subclasses and races are great, especially the Satyr, but this small change to the Triton is my personal favorite thing in the book.

What are your favorite things in the book? Do you have a favorite creature? A favorite new mechanic, like Piety or Mythic monsters? A favorite new player option? Favorite deity?

I'd love to hear your thoughts, and will post with some of my reviews and favorite things in the book down below.
 

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Zabalorf

Villager
I’ve loved Greco-Roman mythology since I saw Disney’s Hercules as a kid at the movie theatre. Wow that was awhile ago.

Im pretty excited to run a campaign with my friends who like D&D and Magic. I’m not really into card games but we should have a blast playing this once our current game ends. I’m getting the Alt hardcover in July though.
 

I personally didn't see the Hercules movie until after I already knew enough about greek mythology to know that Hercules is the roman version of him. Heracles is the greek name.

I have the digital copy on D&D Beyond, and preordered a physical copy on Amazon.
 

Fenris447

Explorer
I picked up the D&D Beyond version so I could get to the content for Hero Lab programming purposes, and have had the special cover version ordered from my FLGS since it was available.

I kinda dig the Piety system. They built it into both the Supernatural Gifts and the artifacts, plus they even gave a balanced option for characters who want to purposefully avoid it in a game that uses it. Even if I don't use it as-is in my game, it is ripe for homebrewed iteration and expansion. It's the kind of modularity that makes me love 5e.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
I love it so far, though I’m disappointed in how few of each type of new options it contains. The supernatural gifts, in particular.

One thing I miss from 4e was the dragon magazine supplementary content issues, where they’d do a whole set of Asian inspired options or Fey options or Shadow options as a supplement to whatever was coming out in print form.

I get why they don’t do that still, but damn. 2 new races, 2 new subclasses, a small handful new item, and a few supernatural gifts...actually add that much.

Maybe I’m spoiled by the Eberron book, though.
 


Zabalorf

Villager
I love it so far, though I’m disappointed in how few of each type of new options it contains. The supernatural gifts, in particular.

One thing I miss from 4e was the dragon magazine supplementary content issues, where they’d do a whole set of Asian inspired options or Fey options or Shadow options as a supplement to whatever was coming out in print form.

I get why they don’t do that still, but damn. 2 new races, 2 new subclasses, a small handful new item, and a few supernatural gifts...actually add that much.

Maybe I’m spoiled by the Eberron book, though.

The mythic monsters and MTG setting though! I get it though, I really want a full Dark Sun setting since Dune is about to become hot.
 


I love greek mythology, I got into the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series from a young age, and have been reading them for a long time. They got me into greek, roman, norse, egyptian, and other mythologies. I know more about greek mythology than a normal person would. I love that they made a greek-themed book, but it's not really greek mythology. It's a Magic setting crossover book in the disguise of a greek setting handbook in D&D. It's not what I would've wanted if I had asked for a greek-mythology setting. I don't love the push that they're doing to make more M:tG settings. Ravnica came out making a giant-city setting with strange creatures. We already have something like that in D&D, it's called Sigil. This Theros book was released as a pseudo-Greek mythology setting, instead of being true greek mythology.

I guess I would have preferred a true greek mythology setting. I have a connection with Zeus, Hera, Poseidon, Hecate, so on. I know them, they have an importance in our world, and I understand them. I just don't really care about Heliod, Thassa, Purphoros, or any of the gods or characters in this book. It's not true greek mythology. To me, it just kind of feels like it's fake. It's not a genuine attempt to Greek mythology. It's them trying to start a movement for more Magic: the Gathering worlds so they can publish more settings, like people want, but as easy and convenient as possible. To me, by them making more Magic: the Gathering worlds, that's not "expanding the IP of D&D" and more of cheating.

They have the worlds, they can do a bit of work to translate it to a D&D book with new monsters, items, and characters, and the content that they have to make is already laid out for them. It just doesn't feel like they're concerned about making new interesting settings, as much as they are at having the books be as easy to make as possible. I'm not saying it's easy to make a book, because it's not. The world didn't have a map before, they had to make that. They had to make the Satyr and Leonin race. They had to playtest a few subclasses to put in the book so that players would buy it. What I mean is that hard work in products is appreciated by the community. I personally would prefer a brand new greek themed setting, that is truly greek mythology, opposed to grabbing the thing they have closest to that theme, and making a book out of it.

The book is very well written, I love the Satyr, the Eloquence Bard, the magic items, mythic monsters, the nymphs, and the piety system is very cool. The book has good content, talented people contributed to it, but it still just feels to me that they did Theros because it was smoother sailing than making a unique world, or revamping an old world.
 


Most useful book in 5E for anything that isn't monsters or player options. It gives you good outlines for running adventures in the Underworld, nautical adventures, and adventures with meddling gods. Ravnica and Wildemont don't really teach a DM how to run a campaign in their worlds, they just give you the worlds straight up. Meanwhile, Eberron and Theros teach you how to run a game in their worlds. The difference between Eberron and Theros is that Theros doesn't have D-tier art and it feels a lot more FOCUSED. Eberron is BIG. Lots and lots and lots of space in that world. Theros is big too, but it has a thematic focus to it that Eberron loses at times.

In other words, Eberron gives you a little guide for noir or a little guide for pulp, but Theros gives you a BIG guide for odyssey's, and that's exactly what I wanted from the book.

The only other book this useful in 5E (without counting player options or monsters) is Ghosts of Saltmarsh, which is the 2nd best book in 5E not counting Xanathar's or the core 3.

EDIT: I'm glad Theros isn't just Zeus and stuff. That'd be pretty lazy and uninspiring. I have a bunch of books on greek myths. I don't need a D&D book to teach me about the myths I already know. The fact that this isn't 100% greek and is infact a fantasy world means that they could do new things, and novelty is important to a person like me. Rehashed material can be rehashed by someone else.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I guess I would have preferred a true greek mythology setting.
There's a bunch of them available. 7 Greek-inspired settings at my count, with a couple of them being specifically Greek.

 

Mepher

Adventurer
Most useful book in 5E for anything that isn't monsters or player options. It gives you good outlines for running adventures in the Underworld, nautical adventures, and adventures with meddling gods. Ravnica and Wildemont don't really teach a DM how to run a campaign in their worlds, they just give you the worlds straight up. Meanwhile, Eberron and Theros teach you how to run a game in their worlds. The difference between Eberron and Theros is that Theros doesn't have D-tier art and it feels a lot more FOCUSED. Eberron is BIG. Lots and lots and lots of space in that world. Theros is big too, but it has a thematic focus to it that Eberron loses at times.

In other words, Eberron gives you a little guide for noir or a little guide for pulp, but Theros gives you a BIG guide for odyssey's, and that's exactly what I wanted from the book.

The only other book this useful in 5E (without counting player options or monsters) is Ghosts of Saltmarsh, which is the 2nd best book in 5E not counting Xanathar's or the core 3.

EDIT: I'm glad Theros isn't just Zeus and stuff. That'd be pretty lazy and uninspiring. I have a bunch of books on greek myths. I don't need a D&D book to teach me about the myths I already know. The fact that this isn't 100% greek and is infact a fantasy world means that they could do new things, and novelty is important to a person like me. Rehashed material can be rehashed by someone else.
Thanks, that’s exactly what I wanted to know. It sounds like a book I will like. I will probably wait for the physical copy but it sounds like a buy for me.
 

Parmandur

Legend
I love it so far, though I’m disappointed in how few of each type of new options it contains. The supernatural gifts, in particular.

One thing I miss from 4e was the dragon magazine supplementary content issues, where they’d do a whole set of Asian inspired options or Fey options or Shadow options as a supplement to whatever was coming out in print form.

I get why they don’t do that still, but damn. 2 new races, 2 new subclasses, a small handful new item, and a few supernatural gifts...actually add that much.

Maybe I’m spoiled by the Eberron book, though.
I hear ya, more options would be nice.

On the Race front, they are limited by the existing Setting material.

For the Subclasses, they did test a whole parcel for Theros, just two made it through the UA gauntlet.

There are 9 Supernatural Gifts (by my quick count), and suggestions for at least 12 PHB Feats to act as the base Gift. 7 of those gifts play into the Piety system (Iconic and Oracle are straight up 4E style Themes), so that's 7 * 15 combinations once you start getting into Piety around Level 3, not counting PHB options... that's a lot of combos.
 


I hear ya, more options would be nice.

On the Race front, they are limited by the existing Setting material.
Yeah, I do wish they had some more race options or character options, though. Demigods exist in Theros, and I don't think they're mentioned in the book at all. They could be a race or supernatural gift.

Or, they could provide information on how to play a different race in Theros, like Eberron has. Like, you were Nyxborn as a unique creature, possibly like an Elf or something.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
I hear ya, more options would be nice.

On the Race front, they are limited by the existing Setting material.

For the Subclasses, they did test a whole parcel for Theros, just two made it through the UA gauntlet.

There are 9 Supernatural Gifts (by my quick count), and suggestions for at least 12 PHB Feats to act as the base Gift. 7 of those gifts play into the Piety system (Iconic and Oracle are straight up 4E style Themes), so that's 7 * 15 combinations once you start getting into Piety around Level 3, not counting PHB options... that's a lot of combos.
Eh, I don’t see it that way I see it, but I don’t wanna get into a whole thing over it.

on races, though, they could have included a dryad playable race.

I wouldn’t have been sad at a demi-god option in there, as well, unless I missed one.
 



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