D&D Name ONE favourite thing about your favourite edition

How can anyone not choose 1st edition, original D&D. Everything was new.. there was mystery and wonder around every corner.

Nothing against what has followed, some of it is very good, but it's re-inventing the wheel...
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
How can anyone not choose 1st edition, original D&D. Everything was new.. there was mystery and wonder around every corner.

Nothing against what has followed, some of it is very good, but it's re-inventing the wheel...
1Ed was what hooked me back in 1977, it is true. But 3.5Ed was, to me, an improvement that let me make fantasy characters I could not make in 1Ed...but could in other FRPGs.

Being first is important. But one cannot rest on laurels, lest you be passed by.
 

Ahnehnois

Visitor
How can anyone not choose 1st edition, original D&D. Everything was new.. there was mystery and wonder around every corner.

Nothing against what has followed, some of it is very good, but it's re-inventing the wheel...
Because I'm under 40. Nothing against it or anything, but you're talking about something that was published a long time ago.
 

n00bdragon

Visitor
4e: Monster levels and monster math based on levels. I don't even use a monster manual anymore. I generally craft every monster by hand and every fight generally features at least two new monsters. In a typical dungeon I'll rotate around four or five core baddies and then add in specialists and oddballs as necessary. The math is what makes it possible. I love being able to crank out ten new and interesting monsters in an hour or so.
 

Stormonu

Hero
Hard to choose a single edition, as I'm somewhat torn over my favorite.

BECMI - Mentzer red book. All I really ever needed to play D&D right in that book.
1E - Gygax's timeless advice in the DMG
2E - The campaign worlds.
3E - the options; it seemed like you could make whatever you want and actually back it up with an effect.
 

Wednesday Boy

The Nerd WhoFell to Earth
It's not my favorite edition but I would immediately be up for a 2nd Ed. AD&D campaign if I was allowed to play a Wild Mage. That d100 wild surge table is a thing of beauty!
 
1.0 Aside from the new factor, modules G1-G3.
(I am using converted G1 in a 3.5 tourney)
3.5 Because it fixed many of the problems of 1.0
 

SolitonMan

Explorer
3.5 - the warlock

I know it's not considered a powerful class, but my personal experience of playing a warlock was pretty much the most fun I've had in 30+ years of TTRPGs.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
I have to say that, although 4Ed is not my favorite edition, I actually liked its take on the Warlock better than the 3.5Ed version.

My problem with the original version was not its weakness- that power ranking stuff never bothered me- but rather its being tied into such a narrow range of possible patronages. It was a narrative shackle that 4Ed removed.
 
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SolitonMan

Explorer
I have to say that, although 4Ed is not my favorite edition, I actually liked its take on the Warlock better than the 3.5Ed version.

My problem with the original version was not its weakness- that power ranking stuff never bothered me- but rather its being tied into such a narrow range of possible patronages. It was a narrative shackle that 4Ed removed.
Yeah, as with most things that are inconvenient or troublesome, we just ignored that stuff and made it up ourselves. Though since I was playing in the Shackled City campaign, having a demonic forebear somewhere in the family tree actually was useful in the narrative sense. As well as tactically, when I started hearing "the voices"...
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Certainly you could ignore the shackles, but 4Ed went the additional step and gave mechanical support for the different pacts, like how 2Ed diversified the priest class.

Introspectively speaking, if there was one overarching thing I like about RPG designs is options.*

Every time D&D has given me more options in mechanical support for the concepts bouncing around in my head, the more I like it.







* It's why HERO is my favorite system, bar none.
 

SolitonMan

Explorer
Certainly you could ignore the shackles,
I see what you did there! :)

but 4Ed went the additional step and gave mechanical support for the different pacts, like how 2Ed diversified the priest class.

Introspectively speaking, if there was one overarching thing I like about RPG designs is options.*

Every time D&D has given me more options in mechanical support for the concepts bouncing around in my head, the more I like it.







* It's why HERO is my favorite system, bar none.
I think HERO is a great system! I wish I'd have more opportunity to play it, I've only ever been able to dabble. But it did seem to inherently address the broken game mechanics we find in d20-type games at higher levels. With d20, eventually the bonuses overwhelm the effect of the d20 roll. With HERO, from my admittedly limited experience, it seemed that the way a character is built would prevent the 3d6 roll from becoming trivial regardless of the number of points used for character creation. Which means you could play a character an arbitrarily long amount of time and never break the game mechanically.

Would that match your experience?

Sorry to get off-topic with this!
 

darjr

I crit!
Gah! I have so many favorite things! For so many editions. Such anguish! You are a bad man Russ.

I'll go AD&D and the World of Greyhawk boxed set. I love that thing. One day I'll own a copy again.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Moderator
Staff member
Would that match your experience?
It is just as possible to break HERO as any other game. However, doing so requires:

1) either a bit of system mastery

OR

2) a GM who isn't paying attention to the powers with little warning symbols next to them.

The current edition did a lot to fix some of the pure math exploits, but there are still those pesky powers like a Time Travel...

But all that said, IME, it is the rare player who actually went out of their way to do those math exploits or screw around with the most problematic powers. Most were too busy modeling their PCs the way they envisioned them. Time Travel may be capable of screwing things royally, but most people playing supers games are not interested in playing time travellers. They want the iconic powers like flight, super strength, super speed, superhuman toughness, super martial arts or shooting energy beams.
 
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