D&D (2024) New Unearthed Arcana Playtest Includes Barbarian, Druid, and Monk

New barbarian, druid, and monk versions, plus spells and weapons, and a revised Ability Score...

The latest Unearthed Arcana playtest packet is now live with new barbarian, druid, and monk versions, as well as new spells and weapons, and a revised Ability Score Improvement feat.



WHATS INSIDE

Here are the new and revised elements in this article:

Classes. Three classes are here: Barbarian, Druid, and Monk. Each one includes one subclass: Path of the World Tree (Barbarian), Circle of the Moon (Druid), and Warrior of the Hand (Monk).

Spells. New and revised spells are included.

The following sections were introduced in a previous article and are provided here for reference:

Weapons. Weapon revisions are included.

Feats. This includes a revised version of Ability Score Improvement.

Rules Glossary. The rules glossary includes the few rules that have revised definitions in the playtest. In this document, any underlined term in the body text appears in the glossary.
 

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Is not.

"This book contains rules, especially in parts 2 and 3, that govern how the game plays. That said, many racial traits, class features, spells, magic items, monster abilities, and other game elements break the general rules in some way, creating an exception to how the rest of the game works."

You can use your action, and you get one every round, to overcome that monster ability.

This is the rules for the lock. The only difference is that it does not specify that it takes an action:

Lock

A key is provided with the lock. Without the key, a creature proficient with thieves' tools can pick this lock with a successful DC 15 Dexterity check. Your DM may decide that better locks are available for higher prices.

If you really think, that that is the difference between being able to try something again and not, I can't help you....

... but I can help your players get out of this troublesome houseruling.
At least by your definition, an arcane trickster can try again:

Mage Hand Legerdemain​

Starting at 3rd level, when you cast Mage Hand, you can make the spectral hand invisible, and you can perform the following additional tasks with it:

  • You can stow one object the hand is holding in a container worn or carried by another creature.
  • You can retrieve an object in a container worn or carried by another creature.
  • You can use thieves' tools to pick locks and disarm traps at range.
You can perform one of these tasks without being noticed by a creature if you succeed on a Dexterity (Sleight of Hand) check contested by the creature's Wisdom (Perception) check.

In addition, you can use the bonus action granted by your Cunning Action to control the hand.*

Note: he is able to use cunning action to do it. Glad I found the workaround for your game. And yes, you are correct: "magic" is the literal key.

* mage hand text for the complete logic chain:
A spectral, floating hand appears at a point you choose within range. The hand lasts for the duration or until you dismiss it as an action. The hand vanishes if it is ever more than 30 feet away from you or if you cast this spell again.

You can use your action to control the hand. You can use the hand to manipulate an object, open an unlocked door or container, stow or retrieve an item from an open container, or pour the contents out of a vial. You can move the hand up to 30 feet each time you use it.

The hand can't attack, activate magical items, or carry more than 10 pounds.
 
Last edited:

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
This is the rules for the lock. The only difference is that it does not specify that it takes an action:
No. There is no exception to the general rule in the ability check section, at least not one that I have seen or that you have pointed out. There IS an exception in the Roper ability, though. You keep pointing at the general rule and saying that general = exception. It doesn't.

You still by the way haven't successfully addressed that the guidelines in the DMG cover both your method and ours.
At least by your definition, an arcane trickster can try again:

Note: he is able to use cunning action to do it. Glad I found the workaround for your game. And yes, you are correct: "magic" is the literal key.
How do you figure? The mage hand ability only creates an exception to the rule that you have to be next to the lock in question. It does not specify retries, which would be necessary for specific beats general. The exceptions have to be specific.
 

Pauln6

Hero
ROGUE: Oh noes, I have tried to pick this lock for 6 seconds and it is so hard, I cannot doos it.

URCHIN FIGHTER: Here, let me help. Jiggle that a bit more. Dammit. 12 seconds and this lock has us outwitted.

CLERIC: Try again with the blessing of Kord. Oh dear. Try 10 hail Kords while you wrestle me later.

BARBARIAN: It's been 18 seconds guys. Curse this subtlety, I'm breaking it down!
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
Epic
ROGUE: Oh noes, I have tried to pick this lock for 6 seconds and it is so hard, I cannot doos it.

URCHIN FIGHTER: Here, let me help. Jiggle that a bit more. Dammit. 12 seconds and this lock has us outwitted.

CLERIC: Try again with the blessing of Kord. Oh dear. Try 10 hail Kords while you wrestle me later.

BARBARIAN: It's been 18 seconds guys. Curse this subtlety, I'm breaking it down!
No, 5e just broke time by simplifying it away. The problem you describe has been handled in different ways depending on the edition

Back in 2e a turn was ten minutes so spending your turn doing something like searching a room or picking a lock was not viewed as a simple light-switch flipping level exercise.

Back in 3.x a turn was only 6s but it was likely that a serious check like a lock would be a thing where time was adjusted a accordingly when the player decides to take ten or take twenty simply because nobody wants to roll 45 checks knowing that the gm would almost certainly stop them after one or two.

Back in 4e you had skill challenges that expanded time appropriately but could be messy.

Now in 5e simplicity has left us with the worst of both to the point players argue with the gm demanding 45 checks even if the gm has said no and the GM is expected to know enough about locks to explain why a failed 6s attempt prevents additional checks. So yes.. "oh noes" indeed. Oh noes wotc broke it chasing simplicity and threw it in the GM to fix
 

James Gasik

We don't talk about Pun-Pun
Supporter
It's good to know that not only are doors harder to bypass if I cast Arcane Lock, but enemies only get one attempt to try to do so!
 

Pauln6

Hero
No, 5e just broke time by simplifying it away. The problem you describe has been handled in different ways depending on the edition

Back in 2e a turn was ten minutes so spending your turn doing something like searching a room or picking a lock was not viewed as a simple light-switch flipping level exercise.

Back in 3.x a turn was only 6s but it was likely that a serious check like a lock would be a thing where time was adjusted a accordingly when the player decides to take ten or take twenty simply because nobody wants to roll 45 checks knowing that the gm would almost certainly stop them after one or two.

Back in 4e you had skill challenges that expanded time appropriately but could be messy.

Now in 5e simplicity has left us with the worst of both to the point players argue with the gm demanding 45 checks even if the gm has said no and the GM is expected to know enough about locks to explain why a failed 6s attempt prevents additional checks. So yes.. "oh noes" indeed. Oh noes wotc broke it chasing simplicity and threw it in the GM to fix
I don't view these DM challenges as a bug but a feature. The game isn't broke if it accommodates your personal style without missing a beat. If I have a criticism it would be that the game needs an online pdf with a few more examples of what is possible with different playstyles as not every DM might know where to start when trying to find a style that suits them and their players.
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
Epic
I don't view these DM challenges as a bug but a feature. The game isn't broke if it accommodates your personal style without missing a beat. If I have a criticism it would be that the game needs an online pdf with a few more examples of what is possible with different playstyles as not every DM might know where to start when trying to find a style that suits them and their players.
Why did you quote my post & what does your reply have do do with what I wrote? Also what specifically do you mean by "DM challenges"
 

Pauln6

Hero
Why did you quote my post & what does your reply have do do with what I wrote? Also what specifically do you mean by "DM challenges"
When you said they threw it in for the GM to fix, that implied to me that you find the system a challenge for you as a DM to fix.

I was just saying, IMO, the whole game is about challenging the DM and players to collaborate in a way they all enjoy. So challenges for the DM to 'fix' are not bugs, but features.

No game can please all of the people all of the time, so they keep it flexible enough for people to please themselves. We're all expressing our opinions on what works in our games in the hope of inspiring others to try the same and see if it works for them.
 

No. There is no exception to the general rule in the ability check section, at least not one that I have seen or that you have pointed out. There IS an exception in the Roper ability, though. You keep pointing at the general rule and saying that general = exception. It doesn't.

You still by the way haven't successfully addressed that the guidelines in the DMG cover both your method and ours.

How do you figure? The mage hand ability only creates an exception to the rule that you have to be next to the lock in question. It does not specify retries, which would be necessary for specific beats general. The exceptions have to be specific.
Ok. That's selective reading.
 

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