News Digest: New D&D Licensed Products, Steve Jackson Games Annual Report and New Products, Internat

Hello everyone, Darryl here with this week’s gaming news! New Dungeons & Dragons licensed products from the Toy Fair, International Tabletop Day announcements, Steve Jackson Games Stakeholders Report for 2017 and announcements for 2018, and more!

Two big Dungeons & Dragons licensed product announcements came out of the Toy Fair this year, one literally. The first came from Gale Force 9 who gave details on their new Dungeons & Dragons board game. Few real details came out as it’s tied to the August campaign release, but the game will be two to four player cooperative game released in August for around $50, shortly ahead of the release of the new adventure. Gale Force 9 also announced a new set of card accessories for Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition with additions to their spell decks, two new monster decks, and a magic item deck. A new line of Dungeons & Dragons branded miniature paints in two sets, one with ten colors and a paint brush for $25 and another with thirty-six colors and a large model for $70, due out in June.

[Image removed at the request of ICv2]

Meanwhile, WizKids also had several big announcements. The picture above? That’s the new “miniature” in the D&D Icons of the Realm line, the Ship Falling Star. That is the prototype of a full-scale ship with removable decks that are reversible with one side marked with a grid and the other side plain. The first release will be fully painted with a possible unpainted release thereafter. No price or firm release date was announced, but it is planned for release later this year. In addition, WizKids showed off the newest in their “trophy bust” line, this time a black dragon pictured below. This will join the red dragon, beholder, and mind flayer to decorate the walls of your gaming room.

[Image removed at the request of ICv2]

No, that isn’t a strange misplaced logo or a neighboring booth. NECA, the parent company of WizKids, acquired Joseph Enterprises, Inc., the company best known for its omnipresent product commercials for Chia Pets and The Clapper. The company was founded by Joseph Pedott, who will stay with his namesake company during its transition into NECA. While this may seem like an odd fit, the Chia Pet product line has increasingly included more licensed material (most recently a tie-in with Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 with a Groot Chia Pet), and the acquisition also gives NECA the marketing arm of Joseph Pedot Advertising. The WizKids booth also had several upcoming Chia Pet products on display, including Hello Kitty, Bob Ross, and emoji.


International Tabletop Day planning is underway with the announcement of the first pre-orders. This year’s games include Sparkle*Kitty variant box art by Breaking Games, Sagrada promos by Floodgate Games, Wonderland which is exclusive to the event from Renegade Games, Action Cats exclusive expansion by Twogether Studios, and a Tabletop Day promo pack from Fireside Games. The promotional games are available for order through normal game distribution channels for store owners. There will also be a marketing kit (limited to 1500) which includes stickers, posters, table stands, and more available for just shipping and handling costs for any game store or community event from the Geek & Sundry website. International Tabletop Day this year is April 28 and you can find out what locations near you are participating at the Tabletop Day official website.


Steve Jackson Games released their annual Report to the Stakeholders for last year. While Munchkin and Zombie Dice are still strong sellers, revenue was down $500,000 from the previous year. If you’re interested in the ins and outs of game publishing for both roleplaying games and tabletop, it’s a fascinating look behind the curtain, but I’ll save you from that if it’s not your thing. What is of note is that Dungeon Fantasy Roleplaying Game cost more to produce than “was healthy” and, while it is expected to sell out by the end of this quarter, it will not be reprinted. “The current market doesn't leave room for a game like this to succeed, and it's a great thing that we cut our planned print run by 30% or we would be stuck with copies for years to come.” The card game Port Royal was also listed as a failure as the licensed game from Pegasus had little demand as English language versions imported from Europe undercut sales.

Things are looking up in 2018 for Steve Jackson Games, however, with the launch if the Munchkin Collectible Card Game designed by Eric Lang and Kevin Wilson. Each of the three starter decks has two class decks with a retail price of $19.95: Ranger and Warrior, Wizard and Bard, and Cleric and Thief. Boosters are also available for $3.95 each with 12 cards per pack and 24 packs per display box. Two expansions are already announced, The Desolation of Blarg and Fashion Furious. A new 112 card expansion to the core Munchkin game will be out in October, Munchkin 9: Jurassic Snark which let John Kovalic draw a lot of dinosaurs, while the Munchkin Cheats comes out in June with thirty new cheat-themed cards for $9.95. Finally, the third party licensed Munchkin media tie-in game line continues to grow, with Munchkin Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles based on the original comic featuring art by Kevin Eastman coming to Kickstarter from IDW next month. Finally, The Fantasy Trip is in Steve Jackson’s personal hands as the game and a Kickstarter are currently under planning with an announcement most likely at Origins Game Fair.


Gen Con announced that ticket sales have increased 6% over last year, the first sell-out year in the conventions fifty-year history. Odds are, that means we’re headed for another sell out this year as well, and this time even sooner than the early July from last year. If you’re even thinking about attending this year’s “The Best Four Days in Gaming”, I’d recommend purchasing now as you can still receive a full refund by contacting Gen Con customer service by phone until June 17 if you change your mind. In the sales announcement, Gen Con also announced the dates for the next four conventions after extending its contract with Indianapolis until 2022: August 2-5 this year, August 1-4 in 2019, July 30-August2 in 2020, August 5-8 in 2021, and August 4-7 in 2022.


Humble Classics Return Bundle is all about games who found a new life long after being thought gone, through both direct sequels and spiritual successors. The $1 level gets you Shadowrun Returns and Shadowrun Dragonfall along with Broken Sword 5: The Serpent’s Curse and Tesla Effect: A Tex Murphy Adventure. The beat-the-average (which is currently about $8.50) has Shadowrun Hong Kong along with Wasteland 2, Age of Wonders III, and Xenonauts. The $15 top-tier level gets you Torment: Tides of Numenera, based on Numenera from Monte Cook Games and the spiritual successor to Planescape: Torment, along with Dreamfall Chapters: The Final Cut. If you’re a Humble Monthly subscriber (where you can get Dark Souls III as your early unlock this month plus more games at the start of the month), you also receive a $2 credit to the Humble Store. This bundle runs until Tuesday, March 6.


Edge of Darkness from Alderac Entertainment Group is a card crafting worker placement game where the players take on the role of guildmasters attempting to exert control over the city of Aegis. It’s hard to describe this game as it’s almost two games in one, or a game with its expansion…but it’s not. Let me just jump to the pledge levels. The Agent level for $60 gets you the center game board, 12 Location boards for places in the city, 90 Advancements for those locations, and the proper cardboard tokens with a bonus set of card sleeves to help protect your game. The Guildmaster level for $100 gets you the center game board plus the advancement extension boards, 21 Location boards and 158 Advancements, and 3D tokens to represent your agents. So it’s somewhere between the base game and its expansion or the base game and a deluxe edition. Either way, there’s more to this project than that as they’ve already unlocked several stretch goals with more to go until the campaign funds on Friday, March 23.

Traveller RPG: Element Class Cruisers is a new boxed set for the latest edition of the classic science fiction roleplaying game. This boxed set includes not only stats and construction rules for the Element class ships, but also ten poster-sized double-sided full-color blueprints for each ship detailed. And if you’re new to Traveller (or missed out on this newest edition), you can also purchase the available core rulebooks so far as add-ons. The PDF copy is available for a £25 (about US$35) pledge, the print version for £50 (about US$70), two different £150 (about $209) pledge levels which add on either all 38 current PDFs for Traveller or the four hardcover rulebooks, and for £275 (about US$382) you get everything in print and PDF both. This project is fully funded and runs until Sunday, March 18.

That’s all from me for this week! Find more gaming crowdfunding news at the EN World RPG Kickstarter News website, and don’t forget to support our Patreon to bring you even more gaming news content. If you have any news to submit, email us at news@enworldnews.com. You can follow me on Twitter @Abstruse where I’m grousing about no one bidding on my eBay auctions so I can afford to upgrade my computer while also whining about computer part prices, follow Gamer’s Tavern on YouTube featuring videos on gaming history and Let’s Plays, or you can listen to the archives of the Gamer’s Tavern podcast. Until next time, may all your hits be crits! Note: Links to Amazon, Humble Store, Humble Bundle, and/or DriveThru may contain affiliate links with the proceeds going to the author of this column.
 
Darryl Mott

Comments

Sir Brennen

Villager
[MENTION=6669048]Abstruse[/MENTION] - the link you have toward the bottom of the article to the Kickstarter News website takes me (at least) to a page which says I don't have permission to access (logged in, Copper subscriber). Also, is it linked off of any other menus on the front page? I can't find it anywhere.

Oddly enough, I do see Kickstarter articles when hitting the main news page browsing on my phone, but not on my PC.
 
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Abstruse

Adventurer
@Abstruse - the link you have toward the bottom of the article to the Kickstarter News website takes me (at least) to a page which says I don't have permission to access (logged in, Copper subscriber). Also, is it linked off of any other menus on the front page? I can't find it anywhere.

Oddly enough, I do see Kickstarter articles when hitting the main news page browsing on my phone, but not on my PC.
Odd, it should be taking you to the following link:

http://www.enworld.org/forum/content.php?3460-enn-news-network

I'll poke around at it a bit for next week.
 

Jester David

Adventurer
I know the Kraken is the current case incentive.

That ship will be a freakin' fortune. Be ready to spend $200 at least. Man, I needed the hell out of that ship two years ago when I ran Skull & Shackles. Can't imagine needing it enough now to justify the purchase... But for people still wanting to play a Pirate or Spelljammer or Naval campaign it will be awesome.
 

prosfilaes

Villager
I would not be surprised if in a few years the only print products will be core rule books, everything else being sold as PDF's.
I think a lot of PoD stuff will be out there. I also don't think the line will be as neat as "core rule books"; Paizo will still be printing adventure paths, whereas a lot of core rule books are already PDF only. Color books on 8.5x11 or A4 paper are really awkward to use in PDF form, so I suspect that's going to be part of the dividing line; if they have enough money to print in full color, they're likely to continue printing in full color.

I think The Fantasy Trip may be a reset button for Steve Jackson Games, it gives the company a chance to develop another RPG line with a much smaller scope and no baggage. The problem I see is TFT was not a particularly popular game back in the 70's and it has been dead for 35 years. I just do not see any evidence that there is enough support out there for TFT to end up being anything other than a vanity project for Steve Jackson.
Is that what they're trying to do? I'm expecting more of a fancy reprint for RPG fans who like cool reprints. Include a bunch of stuff, add a bunch of notes, etc. Any way, if they set up the Kickstarter right, I suspect they won't lose money on it, and what's being your own boss for if not for being able to do vanity projects?
 
Is that what they're trying to do? I'm expecting more of a fancy reprint for RPG fans who like cool reprints. Include a bunch of stuff, add a bunch of notes, etc. Any way, if they set up the Kickstarter right, I suspect they won't lose money on it, and what's being your own boss for if not for being able to do vanity projects?
I was just speculating, at this point no one but Steve Jackson and his inner circle know what he is thinking, but if I were him, in todays market, I would definitely be thinking about an RPG that has a low cost to entry and a nice gentle learning curve, which sounds a lot like TFT and nothing like GURPS.
 

MasterYogurt

Villager
The GURPS ruleset is awesome -- in both the sense of "great" and "terrifying."

I'd love to run a few games in it (realistic western, gritty fantasy, modern horror) but they've never made this easy.

SJG dropped the ball on this set and kept everything poor about GURPS. Dungeon Fantasy is a terrible name reminiscent of deviant sex parties. Once again, they provide no world-building, just rulesets and kits. The giant but empty box is a good metaphor ("You can put whatever you want in it" doesn't erase the disappointment at its emptiness)

I assume SJ is a very smart person who keeps a tight circle and doesn't listen much to others, because this has been the complaint forever. To run GURPS effectively and capture players, you'd have to basically photocopy the relevant sections of a book, add art and flavor, rename crap to fit your setting, cull the skill list, make several sample character archetypes... And you haven't even done campaign design yet.

People buy based in part on emotions and what captures their imagination. "Toolkit for anything" has a very limited appeal. SJG can't continue to push a product like this when there are so many RPGs that directly capture imagination and provide functional rule systems. It isn't people's fault for not getting GURPS, it's SJG's fault for not making a product that makes people want to play it. I keep getting the feeling SJG believes it's the other way around.

Instead of building generic kits, license the rules for RPGs that are built on the GURPS system. Allow them to reflavor the necessary parts, add art, and selectively use the rules. Yeah, sell the full rule kits as PDFs, but they will never, ever be a market leader.

There is WAY too much GM overhead to use this system effectively. Dungeon Fantasy solves some of the logistics problems but doesn't solve any of the other issues, and the lack of flavor and setting oozes from the product. The same mistakes. Again.
 
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prosfilaes

Villager
I assume SJ is a very smart person who keeps a tight circle and doesn't listen much to others, because this has been the complaint forever. To run GURPS effectively and capture players, you'd have to basically photocopy the relevant sections of a book, add art and flavor, rename crap to fit your setting, cull the skill list, make several sample character archetypes... And you haven't even done campaign design yet.

People buy based in part on emotions and what captures their imagination. "Toolkit for anything" has a very limited appeal. SJG can't continue to push a product like this when there are so many RPGs that directly capture imagination and provide functional rule systems. It isn't people's fault for not getting GURPS, it's SJG's fault for not making a product that makes people want to play it. I keep getting the feeling SJG believes it's the other way around.
GURPS is one of the most successful RPGs of all time. It has been kept in print since the 1980s, and it has a list of over 400 supplements. Objectively, you're wrong; it may not be your cup of tea, but it is, or at least has been, many people's cup of tea.

If you want world-building, GURPS has provided lots of that. Alpha Centauri, Black Ops, Blue Planet, Callahan's Crosstime Saloon, Castle Falkenstein, etc. I understand the limit on support has always been the limited demand for world-building from GURPS fans.

Most of us have been able to build characters from just the rules. If a player gave his fantasy character a WWI gun, it's not really the rule's problem for giving that option, and a player can do that in Pathfinder as well. If you feel compelled to rename Mordenkainen's magnificent mansion because you're not running in Greyhawk, okay, you may have to rename a few things in GURPS, but that's not really a problem most people have had. Likewise, there is a whole series of books of character archetypes, but the first one, GURPS Wizards, introduced the idea in 1996 after 8 years of GURPS 3rd ed., so obviously people survived and enjoyed the game without them. It sold on the claim you can build any character you can dream of, and archetypes don't actually make the system any more flexible.

GURPS sold to people who want a system where they could do what they wanted. It sold a lot of settings on the promise that you won't have a lot of new rules to crank through to figure out what's going on. It's not really a great one-shot system; like Pathfinder, it can take some work to get the hang of the system and all the relevant details. But once the group does, you can run pretty much any setting with GURPS without a whole bunch of new rules.

People buy based in part on emotions and what captures their imagination. "Toolkit for anything" has a very limited appeal.
I want to drop a M:tA based magic system into my science fantasy game. GURPS--done. I want to run a Napoleonic-era secret history with magic wars. GURPS--done. Toolkit for anything has an appeal to huge number of gamers. And often our imaginations are already captured, but we need the rules: I want to play in the world of "Lord Darcy" or "Harry Potter". In both cases, the magic might be a little tricky, but the system works, and with an audience that has played GURPS before, you won't have to trudge through a lot of new rules.

GURPS Time Travel was my first GURPS book. It blew me away at all the possibilities it offered, at the way it offered three different settings and rules and ideas to handle others. It's up there with the Complete Spelljammer's Handbook as the most influential RPG supplement for me.
 

Koloth

Villager
I backed the DF KS. One disappointment was the Adventurers and Spells books were pared down versions of the basic GURPS Character book. Already had GURPS Characters so felt like that was mostly wasted content.

The GURPS line does a wonderful job of providing a rich rules framework and piles of setting material. The big failure is the lack of ready to run modules/adventures. Want to run a Pathfinder or D&D game? There are piles of adventure paths and stand alone one or two session modules. Want to run a GURPS game? Other then a couple of basic modules, your are pretty much out of luck unless you want to make up your own.

I do wonder if the rising production costs are due in part to China starting to implement rudimentary environmental and labor laws.

Orge Designer Edition and the still in process Triplanetary were due to Steve Jackson wanting to do them. ODE suffered from a bad case of feature creep during the KS. Probably why a lot of the later SJG KS have been fairly simple.
 

MasterYogurt

Villager
GURPS is one of the most successful RPGs of all time. It has been kept in print since the 1980s, and it has a list of over 400 supplements. Objectively, you're wrong.
No, GURPS is a charity case. Objectively, you're wrong to assume it's relevant now. The GURPS Dungeon Fantasy DM screen outstripped the Characters book for SJG revenue last year. Dungeon Fantasy has not gotten new people to reach for GURPS, and SJG is pulling the plug on the project after mismanaging cost.

Just because GURPS has a million supplements doesn't mean that people are buying them. And it definitely doesn't mean that more players are being attracted.

Of course the setting and genre books are awesome. GURPS Mysteries is a seminal work, and that's just a single book. But that's not the same as a complete RPG.

It's not really a great one-shot system; like Pathfinder, it can take some work to get the hang of the system and all the relevant details. But once the group does, you can run pretty much any setting with GURPS without a whole bunch of new rules.


Yeah, and SJG could have released an attractive product that would have given groups this experience. And they totally screwed the pooch with Dungeon Fantasy, which belies the complete lack of strategy they have. They need to let go of the "generic anything!" attitude for a while. Leverage the system to power full, complete game systems that use, selectively, the GURPS rule system.

You do this, then groups play these non-generic games, learn the system, and transition to related products.

It sold on the claim you can build any character you can dream of, and archetypes don't actually make the system any more flexible.


Of course archetypes don't make the system flexible. They make the system comprehensible. The goal is to teach people the system. A tech manual doesn't attract players and so they don't learn the system.

---

Let's say a highly attractive setting/rules combo was based on a generic system. Lots of non-generic supplements and rulebooks are released. People want to play this setting. They learn the rules for it. They realize they can play any setting with these rules. They buy the core rules and a setting book.

This is what has happened with Deadlands and Savage Worlds, which is an actively successful generic rules system.

---

I don't say any of this to rag on GURPS. Just the opposite. I like the rule system a ton, its accessories are beyond high quality, and I want to run it badly. But it should be a success right now, not an obscure curiosity. At a time when the industry is growing like mad, GURPS isn't. I want it to so that I can run lots of different games and get my regular group off of DND.

But it takes a totally different vision and strategy to make that happen.
 
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prosfilaes

Villager
No, GURPS is a charity case. Objectively, you're wrong to assume it's relevant now. The GURPS Dungeon Fantasy DM screen outstripped the Characters book for SJG revenue last year. Dungeon Fantasy has not gotten new people to reach for GURPS, and SJG is pulling the plug on the project after mismanaging cost.
After 22 years, I hope they're pulling the plug. Do you know where Steve Jackson got his millions to keep his vanity project going, because I was always under the impression he was a business man. It's not relevant now, but that doesn't mean it hasn't been a successful RPG.

Just because GURPS has a million supplements doesn't mean that people are buying them.
Again, it means that someone was buying them.

Yeah, and SJG could have released an attractive product that would have given groups this experience. And they totally screwed the pooch with Dungeon Fantasy, which belies the complete lack of strategy they have. They need to let go of the "generic anything!" attitude for a while.
I don't want another fantasy setting. The world seriously does not lack for fantasy settings, and Yrth does not scream to me that SJG can produce a fantasy setting that will overcome that.

Let's say a highly attractive setting/rules combo was based on a generic system. Lots of non-generic supplements and rulebooks are released. People want to play this setting.
You say that as if that were as good as saying it. If Steve Jackson Games had something they knew was a highly attractive setting/rules combo, they'd be selling it. They don't. Short of licensed products, I don't recall the last highly attractive new setting/rules combo. Honestly, the 21st century seems rather short on them; most new settings are D&D, Pathfinder, Fate or Savage Worlds. Arcana Unearthed--I don't know if I'd call that highly attractive? Pathfinder/Golarion--maybe, but it doesn't seem to accord with your GURPS plan here.

This is what has happened with Deadlands and Savage Worlds, which is an actively successful generic rules system.
Not really. Certainly they didn't start with a generic system and build Deadlands up. Wikipedia puts them at arm's length from each other, Savage Worlds being a descendant of Great Rail Wars instead of directly Deadlands, and I didn't realize the connection before, so I don't get the impression Savage Worlds was driven much by Deadlands' success.

But it should be a success right now, not an obscure curiosity. At a time when the industry is growing like mad, GURPS isn't.
At a time when the industry is growing like mad? I'm not sure I see that. Outside D&D 5, everything seems relatively static. Numbers? GURPS isn't a success right now, but I'm not sure why you think it should be. It's just not popular versus Fate and Savage Worlds. Peak popularity for that style of crunchy game seems to have come and past, and sometimes instead of trying push a old product, you have to walk away from the trademark and line and do something that's new and that sounds new.

I want it to so that I can run lots of different games and get my regular group off of DND.

But it takes a totally different vision and strategy to make that happen.
Maybe yours, not Steve Jackson Games.
 
R

RevTurkey

Guest
I would have done something radical and different in terms of presentation or possibly gone ultra safe and made a cut down DF box set (where the box was small and fit the components) using the GURPS Lite rules as a basis and then a glossy hard back or couple of hardbacks containing the full, deeper ruleset. Pretty much like D&D have done with several editions and 5th. As I said before...I think it was also a confidence problem...they were almost saying they were going to dump the game before they even had it available to buy. No vision presented for the line going forward. Utter fail from a marketing point of view. It might have been truthful business information they presented about the product they were determined to create but it wasn’t going to inspire customers. The GuRPS line seems too much like either vainty work or badly planned production. I have bought 5 copies of the 4th Edition and never used them...always selling them on and then repeating. The main reason? The crazy lack of a basic monster manual or bestiary type thing. I don’t particulalry want to convert old material either. Books on everything under the sun but nothing on the most time consuming part of the system...making characters/npcs/creatures....you know the bit that needs support the most. I think GURPS was awesome with the original box sets and was a game changer...with amazing support as well. The DF set has included a bestiary which is a massive plus and is why I will get it sometime for the right price...I may even run it this time...it’s just a shame thinking of how much more impact this game could have had on the market. They got a good amount of money from Kickstarter to reduce risk but were not willing to pay that trust back with a bit of risk taking of their own. Oh well. Hopefully SJG will rally, learn from mistakes and impress us all will what they produce next :)
 
Reading all the criticisms of DFRPG, I think most of it has some validity. This is why I am thinking The Fantasy Trip might end up being a sort of reset button for Steve Jackson Games RPG line.
 

Lord Rasputin

Explorer
I backed the DF KS. One disappointment was the Adventurers and Spells books were pared down versions of the basic GURPS Character book. Already had GURPS Characters so felt like that was mostly wasted content.
Uh, yeah. That was the point. It was to make a new fantasy RPG based on GURPS, which means it has to include the material from the Basic Set and Magic. The basic structure was always going to be this, and SJG was pretty up-front about it:

DFRPG Kickstarter said:
GURPS is famous for letting you play any character you can imagine. Dungeon Fantasy keeps this flexibility while trimming away unnecessary details, concentrating on just what matters to monster-slaying, treasure-hunting action
That pretty much means that Kromm is paring down the Basic Set and Magic and adding some of the Dungeon Fantasy PDFs.

The GURPS line does a wonderful job of providing a rich rules framework and piles of setting material. The big failure is the lack of ready to run modules/adventures. Want to run a Pathfinder or D&D game? There are piles of adventure paths and stand alone one or two session modules. Want to run a GURPS game? Other then a couple of basic modules, your are pretty much out of luck unless you want to make up your own.
How much does having published adventures matter? I don't know the answer to that question. I did want something more of a megadungeon in the boxed set, as a megadungeon has replay value; I Smell a Rat is basically one-and-done, and kinda railroady. Having a second megadungeon for sale would be good for demonstration games. But how many D&D and Pathfinder players are playing published adventures? For all the chatter here, I gather the number is much lower than folks realize, especially for D&D (Pathfinder was made to run the adventure paths). This is much more so in the GURPS community. Granted, part of the idea was to break beyond that community, but I'm not sure how great the incentive is to do it with a bunch of published adventures.

Personally, my criticisms of the boxed set are:

  • I Smell a Rat didn't have much replay value. I would have wanted a multilevel dungeon, something like a smaller Caverns of Thracia. Some folks are just going to use the boxed set and nothing else, and this would accommodate them.
  • Kromm doesn't like gear loadouts, but having them would speed up character creation. The platonic ideal here is for someone to get a boxed set under the Christmas tree, then bring it over to grandma's house where s/he can play a game with his/her siblings and cousins that afternoon while waiting for ham and potatoes.
  • Likewise, I was hoping for something like "Pointless Slaying and Looting" from Pyramid #3/72, which would have also sped up character creation. I have fond memories of the Mentzer Red Box.
  • Monsters needed more artwork, and more artwork of the unique monsters. I think we all know how dragons, earth elementals, giant rats, giant spiders, scorpion swarms, and zombies all look. By contrast, many of the unique monsters lack pictures here. I doubt this affected sales at all, but it does make the game easier to play. All of the monsters that originally appeared in Dungeon Fantasy Monsters 1 do have artwork there that SJG could have repurposed. Many of the monsters from Dungeon Fantasy 2: Dungeons lack artwork, and frankly need it, like the mindwarper or the toxifer.
  • While this couldn't be done in the boxed set without raising costs, I'd like Cardboard Heroes of all the monsters in Monsters. That would make a great support product.
 

Koloth

Villager
How much does having published adventures matter? I don't know the answer to that question. I did want something more of a megadungeon in the boxed set, as a megadungeon has replay value; I Smell a Rat is basically one-and-done, and kinda railroady. Having a second megadungeon for sale would be good for demonstration games. But how many D&D and Pathfinder players are playing published adventures? For all the chatter here, I gather the number is much lower than folks realize, especially for D&D (Pathfinder was made to run the adventure paths). This is much more so in the GURPS community. Granted, part of the idea was to break beyond that community, but I'm not sure how great the incentive is to do it with a bunch of published adventures.
Don't know about the world at large, but for the groups I have played with, the majority of our runs have been in published modules or adventure paths. Back when D&D didn't have versions, there weren't adventure paths and we would simply decide which module to try next. Often a poor photocopy of one from a game magazine. Even when a GM was doing a self generated adventure, we often supplemented with a pregenerated module just to give the GM a break.

I hope SJG gives some consideration to a GURPS module KS similar to the one for Ogrezine. More funding would equal letting out additional contracts for more modules. That way they aren't risking money on something that doesn't sell.
 

aramis erak

Explorer
I think a lot of PoD stuff will be out there. I also don't think the line will be as neat as "core rule books"; Paizo will still be printing adventure paths, whereas a lot of core rule books are already PDF only. Color books on 8.5x11 or A4 paper are really awkward to use in PDF form, so I suspect that's going to be part of the dividing line; if they have enough money to print in full color, they're likely to continue printing in full color.



Is that what they're trying to do? I'm expecting more of a fancy reprint for RPG fans who like cool reprints. Include a bunch of stuff, add a bunch of notes, etc. Any way, if they set up the Kickstarter right, I suspect they won't lose money on it, and what's being your own boss for if not for being able to do vanity projects?
The announced (but not yet set up) KS plan is to do the boardgame side as a KS, and see how it goes, plus PDF reprints of those items SJ has rights to.
 

Lord Rasputin

Explorer
Don't know about the world at large, but for the groups I have played with, the majority of our runs have been in published modules or adventure paths. Back when D&D didn't have versions, there weren't adventure paths and we would simply decide which module to try next. Often a poor photocopy of one from a game magazine. Even when a GM was doing a self generated adventure, we often supplemented with a pregenerated module just to give the GM a break.
The last one was true in my experience, but otherwise, this has been mixed. I've had one friend who liked to run them exclusively, but otherwise, most avoided them. And I've played in many groups over more than 30 years.

I hope SJG gives some consideration to a GURPS module KS similar to the one for Ogrezine. More funding would equal letting out additional contracts for more modules. That way they aren't risking money on something that doesn't sell.
If they're stand-alone and have replay value, sure. If they're adventure paths, no.
 

prosfilaes

Villager
The announced (but not yet set up) KS plan is to do the boardgame side as a KS, and see how it goes, plus PDF reprints of those items SJ has rights to.
According to the new FAQ, Steve Jackson got the rights to what he wrote and nothing more, so we won't be getting exact reprints of anything. All new art, for better or worse.
 

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