Next Robert Jordan book announced!

jdavis

First Post
Re: Big Statues

Dreeble said:
Heya:

The last Wheel of Time book I read had a scene where there were these big (really big) statues buried in the ground up to their necks. Anyone recognize this and can tell me which book that was from? I seem to recall reading the first three and only then recognizing the unending plan.

Thanks,
Dreeble

Could be book three or four ( I think Four), that was so very long ago (ten years), those became really important in book 9 (three years ago). Of course their importance was glossed over in book 10 so he could concentrate more on the "Attack of the Weevels".
 

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Holy Bovine

First Post
Re: Re: Big Statues

jdavis said:


Could be book three or four ( I think Four), that was so very long ago (ten years), those became really important in book 9 (three years ago). Of course their importance was glossed over in book 10 so he could concentrate more on the "Attack of the Weevels".

Please! Just tell us whether it was good or not ;) :D

I thought Jordan did and excellent trilogy.

Then he wrote 7 more books :eek:

I really wanted to like the rest of his series but after book 5 I realized he was just jerking us around and that this series would never end. Never, ever. Like the Simpsons it will continue to be produced until it becomes unprofitable. Given his large fanbase Jordan could put out a three ring binder full of memos and grocery lists and still sell millions of copies.

edit I just went to amazon to check out the reviews and had some of the best laughs I;ve had all week. People who gave it 4 or even 5 stars did so (mainly) becasue other books in the series were good! :rolleyes: God I am glad I got out when I did. They must put some kind of brain washing drone powder on all books after the 6th one.
 
Last edited:


Pants

First Post
Re: Re: Re: Big Statues

Holy Bovine said:
Given his large fanbase Jordan could put out a three ring binder full of memos and grocery lists and still sell millions of copies.
Haha :D
It's so true too. Just think what the hardkore fans would say. "This list sets up all kinds of buying opportunities. Don't worry it's just a set-up list."
 

jdavis

First Post
Re: Re: Re: Big Statues

Holy Bovine said:


edit I just went to amazon to check out the reviews and had some of the best laughs I;ve had all week. People who gave it 4 or even 5 stars did so (mainly) becasue other books in the series were good! :rolleyes: God I am glad I got out when I did. They must put some kind of brain washing drone powder on all books after the 6th one.

They should put out a hardbound edition of the Amazon reviews of Crossroads of Twilight, it is much better reading, and more actually happens in the reviews. Feel free to post a review and rate it one star so we can get the rating down even lower, 1 and a half stars is too high. It's a good way to send him a message about his crappy book and you are adding to the literary masterpiece that is the "Crossroads of Twilight Customer Review", the best reading I have found in years.
 

Fade

First Post
RyanL said:
Since I've bashed Jordan enough, I'll take this opportunity to say that I, too, thought Goodkind was complete crap. I couldn't force myself to read more than a few chapters of The Stone of Tears or whatever it's called.

-Ryan

My opinion on Goodking: The first book should have been two books. The second and third books should have been one book. The fourth+ book shouldn't have been.
 

Tyler Do'Urden

Soap Maker
Re: Re: Re: Big Statues

Holy Bovine said:


I thought Jordan did and excellent trilogy.

Then he wrote 7 more books :eek:


:(

He didn't write an excellent trilogy, he wrote an amazing trilogy.

I think we'll have to put Jordan's Wheel of Time on the list of "could have beens"- along with the Star Wars prequels and Master of Orion III...
 

takyris

First Post
I pretty much agree, although now that his rampant redneck sexism is in full flower, it's hard to go back even to the early Wheel of Time stuff, because you can see it there as well. The man really hates women. Hates them. Hates them and fears them.

As for Goodkind, I've ranted multiple times about him, and will likely do so again in the future. He's not writing fantasy. He's writing a lousy romance novel disguised as a lousy fantasy novel. I have nothing against GOOD romance novels, for that matter -- I don't read many myself, but I'll read a GOOD romance novel disguised as a fantasy novel (for example, Robin Hobb's Liveship Traders trilogy).

Goodkind, in my opinion, suffers in just about every meaningful way possible. He can't do characters. He can't do plots. He can't do fight scenes. His first book -- which I read because I had a huge fever and it was the only thing in my house -- abruptly turns into the Terry Goodkind bondage hour for the last two hundred pages for no apparent reason. And so on. If anyone defends Goodkind, I'll hunt down my previous post and requote it, because it was fresh on my mind back then and I had really pointed observations, most of which I've mercifully forgotten.

-Tacky
 

jdavis

First Post
Re: Re: Re: Re: Big Statues

Tyler Do'Urden said:


:(

He didn't write an excellent trilogy, he wrote an amazing trilogy.

I think we'll have to put Jordan's Wheel of Time on the list of "could have beens"- along with the Star Wars prequels and Master of Orion III...

The fact that the first books were so good is the reason that the last books make me so angry. I'm not holding him up to the average fantasy books for comparison I am holding him up to his past books for comparison. Up through Book six they were very good (you started getting some drop off in 5 and 6 but not that much) Book 7 would of been a good fantasy book but it wasn't a good Jordan book, book 8 slipped some more, book 9 got back a little at the end but still wasn't up to the level he set, and book 10 is garbage by any comparison, it is well written but it is so obviously filler material. Books 1 through 3 would have to be considered some of the best fantasy books ever, 4 through 6 were incredible with some minor flaws starting to show, 7 through 9 show that he has lost his way and is having a time figuring out where to go with this, and 10 is just plain sell another book for money.
 

The Serge

First Post
More waiting at the Crossroads.

Well, here's a review I wrote some time ago:

As is usually the case with Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time cycle, the writing is good to excellent, and the intrigue and mystery is very involving. As is also usually the case, Jordan has this thing for corporal punishment and loves to play around with power and hierarchy to a degree that almost seems... well, forced.

What I've come to notice in many of these books is that Jordan likes to play games with power between groups and especially between people within groups and what happens when established barriers break down, resulting in a redistribution of power. There are numerous webs of interaction with this major theme, particularly with those who lose power to another greater force. He loves this theme and, if you're not paying attention, it's pretty interesting. If you are paying attention, it begins to wear on you because it's always the same. Of course, perhaps that's Jordan's point. Power is relative.

As for any resolution of anything, don't expect it in this book. If nothing else, Jordan will have fans frothing at the mouth (likely in frustration, not anticipation) because not even a single sub-plot is resolved in this book. He does, however, set up massive implications for his next book. The question one has to ask is, "Was this 600 pager necessary? Could Jordan have maintained the same level of intensity, detail, and intrigue without forcing readers to go through another book in which nothing really happens, but events are just set up for a 'happening?'" The answer is, "Yes."

We spend a lot of time with all of the principles in this book (well, with the exception of Lan and Nynaeve), but we don't really learn anything new about them. Jordan has established these characters well already and, when there's no further development necessary in a book/series of this sort, then action is required in order to maintain the story's integrity. We get very little action here and a lot of talking. The talking would have been fine if we saw more about these characters that we didn't already know, but, with the possible exception of Perrin (and that's a real stretch), we don't really learn anything new.

Another challenge with this book is a problem that will require most fans to re-read the entire series from start to finish once (well, if) Jordan finishes the cycle are the number of secondary and tertiary characters he introduces. There are so many different Aes Sedai, so many different rulers, so many different servants, so many different people to whom he dedicates a great deal of time and effort to, you would think that you could differentiate them from each other. Unfortunately, when you're waiting a year or two between books in which there is a cast of almost 100 characters, this becomes virtually impossible, especially when Jordan adds more and more characters to the mix. Because of Jordan's obsession with Power among people and groups and how that Power is manipulated, these characters are all very similar. Each is wondering how s/he ranks compared to this other character and how s/he can use that other character to get what s/he wants and how much they can trust, and so on, and so on. Again, this may well be the point Jordan's trying to convey (among others) but there are better ways of doing this.

Is this a good book? Yes. It still captures the breadth of the world and the various cultures he's created and the massive past that these people must contend with, not to mention the certain, yet simultaneously uncertain, future that looms like a mountain before them. Also, let's remember that what Jordan has done has revitalized genre fantasy in many ways. His books have had a tremendous influence on the genre. Even at his worse, Jordan's books are significantly more sophisticated that much of the standard fare out there.

Is it one of his better books in the cycle? No. Once again, this book reads like a filler. We are introduced to more and more mysteries without a single resolution. We are introduced to a few more characters (at least it seems that way) about whom we learn very little. We are reminded about threats, but receive no clarification. And we end with more questions than answers. Even within a series of books, there should be a central theme and plot (even a sub-plot) that ties the book together, within which there is some kind of resolution. Yes, the name of this is Crossroads of Twilight, and it's obvious that each character is facing a fork in their destiny. But there are no resolutions at all. In Tolkien's The Two Towers (more so the book than the recent movie), the sub-plot is dealing with Saruman and the Riders of Rohan. In Lucas's Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, it's determining why Darth Vader has an obsession with Luke and the resolution of Han and Leia's love affair. In Crossroads of Twilight (like the previous three books in the cycle), we really don't learn much of anything.

So, until the next novel, we fans will wait until... Well, until Tarmon Gaidon I suppose to learn something new. And that's a real shame.

As a fantasy novel, this is a B+. For Jordan, this is a D+.
 

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