D&D 5E Odd things in the rules that bug you?

FarBeyondC

Explorer
Looking in at the last bits of the ranger thread (It's official, WOTC hates Rangers (Tasha's version of Favored Foe is GARBAGE)), got me to thinking about barding (particularly as a solution to the "low ac" complaints being raised there) and it's there I run into a problem. A big problem. Barding weighs twice as much as the equivalent humanoid armor - regardless of the size of the creature it was made for.

Like, what? How does that even begin to make sense?

The idea that barding for tiny creatures and barding for gargantuan creatures somehow weighs the same is something that boggles my mind.

But what boggles yours?
 

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Arvok

Explorer
The idea that a normal work week is 5 days with a 2 day weekend. I can't recall if that's stated explicitly in the core rulebooks, but I do remember Xanathar's stating that. Also, there seems to be a notion that most people work about 8 hours a day.

It hurts my brain to think that the designers honestly think a 40 hour work week is the norm not just throughout the world, but throughout history.
 

aco175

Legend
Would halfling plate weight be the same as human sized plate? I would think not. I think the weight is for medium-size armor and small-size should be scaled as appropriate. A horse is large in 5e so the armor weighs more than that for a large troll, does not sound right. Most likely having to do with carrying capacity being 1.5
 

Arvok

Explorer
The idea that it takes just as long to don mail armor as it does a suit of plate. Or that it takes just as long to don a hauberk as it does a breastplate. And that you can just as easily don a breastplate by yourself as you can a hauberk.
 


tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
Looking in at the last bits of the ranger thread (It's official, WOTC hates Rangers (Tasha's version of Favored Foe is GARBAGE)), got me to thinking about barding (particularly as a solution to the "low ac" complaints being raised there) and it's there I run into a problem. A big problem. Barding weighs twice as much as the equivalent humanoid armor - regardless of the size of the creature it was made for.

Like, what? How does that even begin to make sense?

The idea that barding for tiny creatures and barding for gargantuan creatures somehow weighs the same is something that boggles my mind.

But what boggles yours?

Barding weight is a carry over from older editions where heavier armor hit your move speed & a mount could let you sidestep it. Unfortunately they removed that & the other subjective elements from armor/weapons & mounts were generally fairly pointless as a result but barding wasn't changed. Weight modifiers for armor built for creatures that were bigger/smaller than medium is another thing that was inexplicably cut in the process.

My gripe is how every aspect* of so many spells feel like they were balanced as if each & every individual component needs to do the heavy lifting to ensure that spell won't be a key part of things like CoDzilla or linear fighter, quadratic wizard while 5e inverts lfqw at increasing pace as extra attacks give larger & larger multipliers to feats magic items, & so forth to the martial side of that curve. It's hard to tell but it looks like TCoE might be experimenting with some caster tools among those items & class features that acknowledge the inversion is something that needs some tools for 5e's linear side.



* duration, range concentration, damage, etc
 


vincegetorix

Jewel of the North
The lack of metric system in the book? I get that the game is made by American designers, but at least give us the metric equivalent in parentheses or something! We live in Canada, so we are kinda used to use both system, so it is not that bad, but I still find it weird.
 



FXR

Explorer
The idea that a normal work week is 5 days with a 2 day weekend. I can't recall if that's stated explicitly in the core rulebooks, but I do remember Xanathar's stating that. Also, there seems to be a notion that most people work about 8 hours a day.

It hurts my brain to think that the designers honestly think a 40 hour work week is the norm not just throughout the world, but throughout history.

It makes a lot of sense in a medieval context. People were dependent on the sun for their activities and enjoyed large breaks during the days. Also, they had much more holidays then we do. In fact, people in the medieval era work much less than we do.
 

Arvok

Explorer
It makes a lot of sense in a medieval context. People were dependent on the sun for their activities and enjoyed large breaks during the days. Also, they had much more holidays then we do. In fact, people in the medieval era work much less than we do.
I don't know where you're getting that notion. The overwhelming majority of people were agricultural workers and would work pretty much from sunrise to sunset. In the winter this meant shorter hours and more sleep (nobody stayed up late browsing the internet, for instance), but they routinely worked long weeks with only Sunday as a day of rest. True, their were other holidays throughout the year, but people didn't have nearly the amount of leisure time we in the West enjoy today. Producing food using nothing but human and beast labor and without modern fertilizers was very hard. They certainly worked at a slower pace than many of us do today, but they had to put in a lot of hours just to get by (and death by starvation--or at least death because you had been weakened by undernourishment--was not at all unheard of).
 

Arvok

Explorer
The lack of metric system in the book? I get that the game is made by American designers, but at least give us the metric equivalent in parentheses or something! We live in Canada, so we are kinda used to use both system, so it is not that bad, but I still find it weird.
I understand your complaint, but I believe the lack of the metric system is strength. In fact, I think the designers of 5e went too far trying to make systems more rational (the decimal monetary system, for instance). The medieval world (I know--D&D isn't historical medieval, but it was always supposed to be medieval fantasy) was full of irrational systems of measurement. Traveling from one kingdom to the next might mean you would have to learn a whole new system of weights and measures. The quirkiness of the English system is only a taste of the confusion of the medieval world's systems of measure.
 

Oofta

Legend
I don't know where you're getting that notion. The overwhelming majority of people were agricultural workers and would work pretty much from sunrise to sunset. In the winter this meant shorter hours and more sleep (nobody stayed up late browsing the internet, for instance), but they routinely worked long weeks with only Sunday as a day of rest. True, their were other holidays throughout the year, but people didn't have nearly the amount of leisure time we in the West enjoy today. Producing food using nothing but human and beast labor and without modern fertilizers was very hard. They certainly worked at a slower pace than many of us do today, but they had to put in a lot of hours just to get by (and death by starvation--or at least death because you had been weakened by undernourishment--was not at all unheard of).
A quick Google search shows that while it's debated, we probably put in more hours at work than our ancestors did.

But it varies widely depending on when and where. Certainly planting and harvest times were busy, but other than that? Not so much.

As with all things historical, it also depends on who you ask.
 

Arvok

Explorer
A history degree with a focus in medieval Europe shows that medieval people worked longer and much harder than most of people in the modern West do. Certainly some people work ridiculously long hours today but that is because of modern connectivity they can be "working" while doing something else.

The idea that planting and harvest times are slow is not exactly true either. The off season was (and still is for modern agriculturalists) a time to catch up on things that weren't done during those busy times (fence repair/maintenance, building & tool repair/maintenance, slaughtering animals, preparing foods for storage, etc.). There isn't the same sense of urgency for a lot of those tasks as there is for planting and harvesting, but there are a bunch of things that need to get done.
 



Argyle King

Legend
The lack of metric system in the book? I get that the game is made by American designers, but at least give us the metric equivalent in parentheses or something! We live in Canada, so we are kinda used to use both system, so it is not that bad, but I still find it weird.

Related to that... I'm not a fan of the 5-foot square as the baseline measuring system.
I feel as though it leads to weird dimensions for buildings, doors, and a variety of other things.

I would vastly prefer that a 1-yard (3 feet) square be used. In metric, that would be roughly 1 meter per square.
 



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