D&D 5E Orichalcum?

Shadowdweller00

Adventurer
So I wanted to introduce a weapon made of an unusual magical metal for an upcoming game. Orichalcum seemed like a suitable legendary type. The only problem is - what exactly makes orichalcum special and unique? In the real world it was likely some sort of bronze or brass alloy. I believe Plato wrote about it in reference to Atlantis. In legend and general fantasy lore it has generally been given magical properties.

I'm kind of thinking something along the lines of: Orichalcum is a magical alloy of bronze and gold that is supernaturally strong and has been infused with radiant energy. Items made from orichalcum gleam with an unearthly luster that always seems brighter than surrounding light sources, though they do not normally illuminate dark areas by themselves. Like florescent pigments. Weapons and Armor made from orichalcum are automatically magical (+1) when fighting most enemies, except for the following: Celestials and Fey are resistant to the energy infusing the metal, and treat strikes from weapons made of Orichalcum as if they were non-magical. (Even those normally associated with darkness). All other creatures who are struck by orchicalcum weapons take normal, magical-weapon damage AND count as having been exposed to bright sunlight (including for purposes of Light Sensitivity) in any round during which they are hit by an orichalcum weapon. Divine, Arcane, or specific spell-focuses made of orichalcum empower light and radiant-based spells, treating them as if they were cast using a spell slot one level higher. Light or Radiant-based cantrips cast using such a focus deal +1 damage. Orichalcum is often used to outfit fey warriors who cannot abide the touch of iron.

What do you all think? Suitable? Too fiddly or complicated? Have other ideas that you think are better?
 
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EzekielRaiden

Follower of the Way
So I wanted to introduce a weapon made of an unusual magical metal for an upcoming game. Orichalcum seemed like a suitable legendary type. The only problem is - what exactly makes orichalcum special and unique? In the real world it was likely some sort of bronze or brass alloy. I believe Plato wrote about it in reference to Atlantis. In legend and general fantasy lore it has generally been given magical properties.

I'm kind of thinking something along the lines of: Orichalcum is a magical alloy of bronze and gold that is supernaturally strong and has been infused with radiant energy. Items made from orichalcum gleam with an unearthly luster that always seems brighter than surrounding light sources, though they do not normally illuminate dark areas by themselves. Like florescent pigments. Weapons and Armor made from orichalcum are automatically magical (+1) when fighting most enemies, except for the following: Celestials and Fey are resistant to the energy infusing the metal, and treat strikes from weapons made of Orichalcum as if they were non-magical. (Even those normally associated with darkness). All other creatures who are struck by orchicalcum weapons take normal, magical-weapon damage AND count as having been exposed to bright sunlight (including for purposes of Light Sensitivity) in any round during which they are hit by an orichalcum weapon. Divine, Arcane, or specific spell-focuses made of orichalcum empower light and radiant-based spells, treating them as if they were cast using a spell slot one level higher. Light or Radiant-based cantrips cast using such a focus deal +1 damage. Orichalcum is often used to outfit fey warriors who cannot abide the touch of iron.

What do you all think? Suitable? Too fiddly or complicated? Have other ideas that you think are better?
Well, let's see if we can trim that down a little without sacrificing too much.

Orichalcum is a magical alloy of tin, copper, gold, and other metals, favored by angels and fey warriors. Infused with radiant energy and supernaturally strong, it amplifies light which strikes it, though it generates none on its own. Ordinary weapons and armor made of orichalcum are innately magical (+1), but this effect fails against Celestial and Fey creatures; proper magic items work as normal. If a non-Celestial, non-Fey creature hits orichalcum armor with a melee attack or is struck by an orichalcum weapon, treat it as though it has been exposed to bright sunlight for all purposes until the start of its next turn. A spellcasting focus can also be made of orichalcum, which empowers spells that deal radiant damage, increasing that damage by +1.

That's slightly shorter, but says basically the same thing.
 
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This is from the Shadowrun RPG setting:

Orichalcum (greek ὀρείχαλκος) is an orange-golden arcane alloy, which can only be manufactured with the means of alchemy. The very existence of Orichalcum is a metallurgical nightmare, as it cannot exist without the presence of magic. It is believed by some magical authorities in studying ancient legends that the inhabitants of Atlantis discovered orichalcum.

Orichalcum is very valuable—a single gram was once worth 88,000 nuyen, although increased supply and deflation of the nuyen has brought this value down to 50,000 nuyen—and both the raw materials and the production process are time-consuming and expensive. Orichalcum is needed in particular for the production of many magical foci and telesma.


So you could have it where it has to be made by a Artificer (Alchemist)
 

pukunui

Legend
Have you played Assassins Creed Odyssey?

Set in ancient Greece and you can trade it with an Olympios of the gods.

In D&D terms naybe crafting component for magic items. Crafts 10 times faster or whatever.
AC Odyssey is where I first learned about orichalcum. That game's version is more like the copper-zinc mineral, aurichalcite.

The name "orichalcum" translates from the ancient Greek as "mountain copper". The Romans referred to it as "aurichalcum", which translates as "gold copper", and their version of it was more of a gold color (whereas the stuff you find lying around on the beach and such in Odyssey is more of a turquoise color, like the aurichalcite mineral).
 
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Zardnaar

Legend
AC Odyssey is where I first learned about orichalcum. That game's version is more like the copper-zinc mineral, aurichalcite.

The name "orichalcum" translates from the ancient Greek as "mountain copper". The Romans referred to it as "aurichalcum", which translates as "gold copper", and their version of it was more of a gold color (whereas the stuff you find lying around on the beach and such in Odyssey is more of a turquoise color, like the aurichalcite mineral).

I had heard of it before pre AC:Odyssey. Didn't know much about it.
Damn I love that game.

Another interesting ancient alloy.

 

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