Planescape Planescape Pre-order Page Shows Off The Books!

You can now pre-order Planescape: Adventures in the Multiverse from D&D Beyond. The set comes out on October 17th.

Scroll down through the comments to see more various peeks at the books!



  • Discover 2 new backgrounds, the Gate Warden & the Planar Philosopher, to build planar characters in the D&D Beyond character builder
  • Channel 7 otherworldly feats, new intriguing magic spells & more powered by planar energies
  • Explore 12 new ascendant factions, each with distinct cosmic ideologies
  • Face over 50 unusual creatures including planar incarnates, hierarch modrons, and time dragons in the Encounter Builder
  • Journey across the Outlands in an adventure for characters levels 3-10 and 17
  • Adds adventure hooks, encounter tables, maps of Sigil and the Outlands & more to your game
This 3 books set comprises:
  • Sigil and the Outlands: a setting book full of planar character options with details on the fantastic City of Doors, descriptions of the Outlands, the gate-towns that lead to the Outer planes, and more
  • Turn of the Fortunes Wheel: an adventure set in Sigil and the Outlands designed for character levels 3-10 with a jump to level 17
  • Morte’s Planar Parade: Follow Morte as he presents over 50 inhabitants of the Outer Plane, including incarnates, hierarch modrons, time dragons, and more with their stats and descriptions


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I don't like to show "chaotic aligment" as "chaotic stupy".


There is order in the nature. For example if you studied Nature in school you can understand how the trees absorb nutrients from the soil, through the sap it is sent to the leaves, and through photosynthesis carbon dioxide is transformed into oxygen and glucose. When a pathogen wants to infect a body, and the immune system responds, there is an "order".

* What weird places from Creepypaste could be source of inspiration for a Planescape adventure? I say Planescape, not Ravenloft.

* What about the spirit world, working like an echo plane, like the Feywild and the Shadowfell?


What if the giants created their secret "spirit world"? Working as a "purgatory" where petitiones woud be working in farms until reach the "ascension".

* Let's imagine a demiplane like New Capena, with magitek, but a secret, the diesel-punk machines aren't true technology but animated by ghosts or spirits. Teorically this is willing, but souls punished to "forced works" for their crimes for their previous lifes.
 

I'm A Banana

Potassium-Rich
Personally, as a player, I think an Adventure is the best way to introduce a setting. I’m not a DM, I’m not going to read a 120+ page setting guide. No thank you!
I have found myself somewhat enamored of WotC's collections of one-shots (Radiant Citadel, Golden Vault, Candlekeep Mysteries), and I think that going this route for the setting books would be such a better call than another Chris Perkins Epic.

Like, I admire that in the Ravenloft book, each domain was kind of its own adventure hook. Spelljammer is more than the Buck Rogers vibes of the adventure it came with. A collection could help highlight multiple aspects of a setting, different tones and different power groups within it, and give DMs something to piece together with a throughline if they wanted.

So I agree, and even think that multiple, shorter adventures would be better than bigger, longer-arc adventures.
 

Quickleaf

Legend
Personally, as a player, I think an Adventure is the best way to introduce a setting. I’m not a DM, I’m not going to read a 120+ page setting guide. No thank you!
You can include an Adventure that's unwelcome – it's one-off, it doesn't have much application outside of its own sphere, it's not easily broken into modular components, it shows a very limited slice of the setting.

And you can include an Adventure that's welcome – it's adaptable and/or has replayability, it has application outside of itself (tools over story beats & showcase scenes), it's designed to be modular, and it shows a wide swath of the setting.
 


Parmandur

Book-Friend
You can include an Adventure that's unwelcome – it's one-off, it doesn't have much application outside of its own sphere, it's not easily broken into modular components, it shows a very limited slice of the setting.

And you can include an Adventure that's welcome – it's adaptable and/or has replayability, it has application outside of itself (tools over story beats & showcase scenes), it's designed to be modular, and it shows a wide swath of the setting.
I would propose that the Spelljammer campaign is essentially like having taken the sundry adventure locations as seen in previous Setting books (or Fizban's or Bigby, for that matter), and stringing them along in an ostensible story. In 64 pages, that book packs a lot of dungeons thst can be excised from the story and used in different ways.
 



Mecheon

Sacabambaspis
On Slaad, my favourite version of them came from 4E. Their gimmick there was they really hated how reality was bound and all the infinite planes of the multiverse weren't accessible any more, so they tended to just. Bite at the problem. Just eating away the fabric of reality. As you do

Plus White Slaad having the ability to just pull alternate versions of themselves from the timestream is always a fun visual

There was also playable sort-of-Slaad in the Neraphim at some point who I wouldn't mind coming back, as a Slaad-lite would be an interesting counter to rogue modrons. One infected with chaos, the other infected with law
 

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