Please explain Other Gaming Systems


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Calico_Jack73

First Post
Palladium FRPG (Yes... I know, Hiss, Yuck!)

Character Gen: Similar to D&D but the different races don't add "pluses" to the roll, you get more dice. If a 16,17,or 18 is rolled it is an exceptional stat and you roll one more d6 and add the result.

Characters & Advancement: Numerous classes but the system does not support multiclassing. Gain XP and gain levels.

Doing non-combat stuff: Simple percentile system. The characters have a percentage chance to accomplish something based upon their level and stat bonuses and the DM can add to the percentage chance if it is super easy or subtract if it is difficult.

Combat: VERY SIMILAR TO D20. However it tries not to be so abstract. Basically a modified roll over 4 on a d20 hits because lets face it... it isn't too hard to hit someone who isn't actively trying to get out of the way. Palladium doesn't assume anything which opens up numerous new possibilities. You can actually allow yourself to get hit relying on your armor to save you but attack in return because your opponent is to busy hitting you to defend himself. If you are hit (over 4 is rolled) but your armor protects you (the hit is under your Armor Rating) you take no damage but your armor does. If you parry the attack with a shield the shield takes damage. The best thing is that it isn't necessary to wear armor to have a survivable character in Palladium which is the number one advantage it has over d20.

Magic: Spell point system and numerous magical styles. Nothing new.

In Summary: Because the combat system and character generation system is so similar this game can easily be used in any d20 campaign setting. Creatures are easily converted from d20 stats to Palladium stats. Combat stats can stay the same. The only difficulty would be skills but even then you figure every +1 to a skill in d20 equates to a +5% in Palladium.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Supporter
Calico, I like the RIFTS world as a setting (if not the mechanics), and Palladium FRP has some of the neater fantasy races in it.

I especially liked the Wolfen. Unlike most takes on anthropomorphic wolves, these guys are almost bearlike in size and strength, but still retaining wolf-like stamina and speed. Truly a race worthy of note.

Jürgen, you should add Mutants & Masterminds to your list of flexible games. Really.
 

Jdvn1

Hanging in there. Better than the alternative.
buzz said:
Another devoted HERO fan here. :cool:
Not a lot of fellow World Tree fans here, but maybe that's because it's an anthropomorphic setting. :\

Should I have mentioned that? :uhoh:
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Supporter
I simply haven't seen it, Jdvn1.

Personally, I like anthropomorphics...I've been collecting the IronWind, Confrontation, and War Gods anthropomorphic minis for some time now.
 

John Q. Mayhem

Explorer
I really, really like Unknown Armies.

I started to try and explain it, but failed, so I will link you to their free rules. This is the publisher's UA website. This is the preview .pdf. It's got all the base mechanics, but not the magic system.

I think Crothian likes UA, too. Perhaps he can explain it better.
 

Jdvn1

Hanging in there. Better than the alternative.
Dannyalcatraz said:
I simply haven't seen it, Jdvn1.

Personally, I like anthropomorphics...
Oh, then allow me to... link the game so that you may look, if interested. ;) Anthropomorphic RPGs dont' get a lot of attention, I've noticed.

I don't know a lot about anthropomorphic systems, but the color of the world has really got me hooked. An interesting (read: fun) advantages/disadvantages system that encourages you to play a (partially) flawed character, all anthropomorphic races--each with its own full color and appeal, and magic is really cool. The spells have names like "I Didn't Really Fall" or "Wet Surprise."

I wrote up a primer for it to explain the game, but I figured it was too long for any one to take interest in.
 
Last edited:

Scribe Ineti

Explorer
Decipher's CODA system, a quick overview.

It's the system in use in the current LOTR RPG and Star Trek RPG. There are minor differences between the two in terms of presenting the system, but they're largely minor tweaks.

So, CODA is a 2d6 system where task resolution is handled (similar to d20) in that you roll 2d6, add attribute modifier, skill ranks, an optional +2 if you have a specific relevant skill specialty, add other optional modifiers, and try to beat a target number normally set by the GM. The better your result beats the TN, the higher level of success you scor. Higher levels of success can grant you additional effects, such as inflicting greater damage, or other narrative bits depending on the whims of the GM and players.

Really choking the TN test means you could suffer some disastrous failures as well.

Health is handled so that everyone and every monster has a number of wound levels, each wound level has a set number of wound points in it. As you take damage, yuo lose wound points, then levels. As you lose levels, you start to suffer penalties to actions until you're healied. Fall to Dazed, you're -1 to all actions. Fall to Injured and you're -3, and so on.

Magic is simple. If you know a spell, you can cast it any time you want. No memorization needed, no spell points to spend, no spell slots to fill. Casting spells requires the caster to make a Weariness check. This means casters can get tired the more spells they cast.

Star Trek calls them professions, LOTR calls them orders. They're the same idea as classes, but much more open ended. Each order or profession has a set number of related skills and a number of special abilities PCs can buy with experience points as they improve.

The CODA system also makes use of personality traits, edges and flaws. Edges are stuff like ambidextrous, Warwise, Accurate, etc. and generally give you bonuses to things. Some edges are more geared toward roke-playing than in buffing a PC. Flaws are either negative impacts on your stats, or are role-playing useful, such as having a character who is greedy or one who is crippled.

The game also has a weariness mechanic, where if your character exerts himself a lot, he or she can get tired and be less effective at things.

The LOTR game has a nifty mechanic for becoming corrupt, and the Trek game has some nice psionic rules.

Both versions of the system are geared more towaard cinematic action and play styles, fitting the TV series or movies/books as appopriate. The LOTR game is highly evocative of the Middle-earth setting, and the Trek game is IMO the best Trek game out there that emulates what a Trek RPG should feel like.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Supporter
Scribe, just to put your last comment into context, which of the Star Trek RPGs have you played?

Last I checked, there were:

Star Trek D6 (West End Games)
StarTrek RPG CODA (Deciper Games)
Prime Directive (Task Force Games)
Prime Directive D20 (WOTC)
Prime Directive GURPS (Steve Jackson Games)
 

jdrakeh

Front Range Warlock
Dannyalcatraz said:
Star Trek D6 (West End Games)

Bzzt. West End Games published the Star Wars RPG. They've never done anything with Star Trek. Also, your list is missing the three different Star Trek games (DS9, Classic, and TNG) published by Last Unicorn Games.
 

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