DDAL Ravenloft Al modles Jasper questions and rants. Spoilers

jasper

Rotten DM
Ok thanks everyone for answering the whip of warning question before the crash. I ran Al04-02 the Beast, and AL04-03 The executioner last Friday night (Sept 16th). The minor rant I got back from some players of the players were not being able to save the puppy.
My rant was the Executioner. What was the writer thinking. Not even a week into a new village and you have to knock over the Mayor's house? I could get anyone one to bite or want to check out that encounter, even the guy who had played the module before. The party followed the current villain to his house. As he tried to escape, the monk did a dash, move, and ki for step of wind to get in front of him. I allowed the party to take him down. As most of players were surprise the monk could move that fast. That just left the final encounter which I skipped most to being frustrated with module and as a strong party the combat may have lasted one extra round. I did give max xp for the module but only min gold. And since I using props, if the player keeps the prop (some which will be needed later), I deduct that too.
Dark gifts. I lost some notes Friday due some one dumping my binder to floor. Where are Dark gifts talked about?
 

kalani

Villager
You shouldn't be awarding max XP unless the characters actually earned max XP as a result of completing all encounters AND the party having the right number of characters to allow it. I have found myself, that having more than 5 players (and sometimes even having 5 players) will result in the characters having zero chance at earning max XP even if they complete each and every encounter.
 

Inconnunom

Villager
You shouldn't be awarding max XP unless the characters actually earned max XP as a result of completing all encounters AND the party having the right number of characters to allow it. I have found myself, that having more than 5 players (and sometimes even having 5 players) will result in the characters having zero chance at earning max XP even if they complete each and every encounter.
As of Season 5 ALDMG you are allowed to adjust adventures beyond the guidelines given in the adventure. Granted you can't give more than the maximum. Sometimes adventures need adjustment because something slipped through during playtesting.

Participating in several DDAO adventures, Frequently the authors (not naming names) never tallied up xp, they just gave us what they felt we earned.


edit: of course I don't mean you get it for free, just that some of the adventures have had some issues.
 

RulesJD

Villager
Ok thanks everyone for answering the whip of warning question before the crash. I ran Al04-02 the Beast, and AL04-03 The executioner last Friday night (Sept 16th). The minor rant I got back from some players of the players were not being able to save the puppy.
My rant was the Executioner. What was the writer thinking. Not even a week into a new village and you have to knock over the Mayor's house? I could get anyone one to bite or want to check out that encounter, even the guy who had played the module before. The party followed the current villain to his house. As he tried to escape, the monk did a dash, move, and ki for step of wind to get in front of him. I allowed the party to take him down. As most of players were surprise the monk could move that fast. That just left the final encounter which I skipped most to being frustrated with module and as a strong party the combat may have lasted one extra round. I did give max xp for the module but only min gold. And since I using props, if the player keeps the prop (some which will be needed later), I deduct that too.
Dark gifts. I lost some notes Friday due some one dumping my binder to floor. Where are Dark gifts talked about?
Let me save you a LOT of frustration down the line.

Stop playing the Season 4 expeditions. Simply put, they are terrible. There's one, maaaaybe two that are worth it. The rest are so bad and disjointed your players will end up more frustrated than anything else.

Instead, run through a different season (I recommend Season 1 as it ties in to Season 5 pretty well). Ever since switching off from Season 4 my players have been much, much happier.
 

Pauper

Villager
Looks like all my Season 4 module reviews were purged in the Great Database Hangover of 2016; while I'll agree that a number of Season 4 modules are disappointing, the season as a whole is salvageable. My own group seems to be enjoying Season 4, but then I'm making some significant tweaks to make the overarching story more visible:

- Include rumors and introduce significant NPCs to foreshadow future adventures during expository scenes in earlier adventures. (Best example: I introduced The Visitor from 04-07 at the meeting with Sybil in the Burgomaster's house.)
- Rather than portraying the villagers as helpless in the face of the monsters and trials they are faced with, show them doing their best to resist the evils that beset them, but, being commoners, not being quite strong enough to overcome the obstacles before them. This way, the PCs can see themselves as heroes helping the villagers rather than the caretakers of an invalid asylum.
- If you have the time and inclination, review some classic Ravenloft material to both get you in the mood and to educate you on things Ravenloft -- great resources that are available in the DMs Guild include Van Richten's Guide to the Vistani, and the 2nd edition box set handbook which covers the whole setting. The original I6 module is also good, but more applicable to the hard-cover Curse of Strahd adventure rather than the AL-published modules.

--
Pauper
 

jasper

Rotten DM
I already doing rumors. And I have I6. I will think of showing some of villagers as strong but outclassed commoners.
Edit to add. I have already committed to my local AL group to run the series for those who missed the first time around.
 
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Scorpienne

Villager
Let me save you a LOT of frustration down the line. Stop playing the Season 4 expeditions. Simply put, they are terrible. There's one, maaaaybe two that are worth it. The rest are so bad and disjointed your players will end up more frustrated than anything else.
I must, regrettably, agree. A few are good. The rest can be made palatable with some significant story adjustments. You're better off playing prior seasons.

p
 

Anthraxus

Explorer
Stop playing the Season 4 expeditions. Simply put, they are terrible. There's one, maaaaybe two that are worth it. The rest are so bad and disjointed your players will end up more frustrated than anything else.
I'll disagree with this and say there are a few great mods, several ok ones, and a few that can be fixed with a little DM work. It can depend, too, on whether your Players/DMs like the Ravenloft setting.
 

RulesJD

Villager
I'll disagree with this and say there are a few great mods, several ok ones, and a few that can be fixed with a little DM work. It can depend, too, on whether your Players/DMs like the Ravenloft setting.
There are TWO Romeo and Juilet storylines that make ZERO sense in the contest of, really, any storyline. They both involve mysterious outsides that had precisely zero foreshadowing.

The last two modules are literally impossible not to be TPKs unless the DM goes completely against the creatures abilities.

There are monsters *cough*Yuan-ti*cough* that have absolutely no business being in a Barovian setting and are never seen from again.

Speaking of never seen from again, how about dem elves that somehow appear and disappear with no reference whatsoever?

How about the terrible editing? How about the absolutely useless magic items?

How about allowing players to sell MISSION CRITICAL items with, yet again, zero foreshadowing that they could be even moderately useful?

How about absolutely no consistent story arch, no continuity between adventures, no particular reason to give a crap about any of the NPCs, inclusion of NPCs that had repeatedly been killed in prior seasons or were so obscure that even DMs who both played and DMd the referenced prior season content had no idea?

How about there being so little indication of what players are supposed to learn from each adventure that requests for explanations between each module have been ignored?

How about the massive amount of "oh look at this obscure reference I can make to the AD&D version of Castle Ravenloft to somehow justify something that had no business being in this edition"?

etc, etc, etc.
 

Steve_MND

Villager
Let me save you a LOT of frustration down the line. Stop playing the Season 4 expeditions. Simply put, they are terrible. There's one, maaaaybe two that are worth it. The rest are so bad and disjointed your players will end up more frustrated than anything else.
While I wouldn't go that far, I have to agree to some extent. For my group, it is by far the most fractious season by a wide margin.

On the one hand, the whole season is just dripping with flavor and atmosphere. That's a good thing, and it's been the number one aspect that our group has liked. As to the quality of the mods, I've found those to be about on-par with most of the ones in previous seasons -- a few good, a few bad, most middling, and the majority fraught with varying degrees of just shoddy editing.

That said, however, the (admittedly experimental) approach of the Ravenloft season has brought with it a host of other, newer issues.

The first being the 'continuous storyline' aspect, wherein the modules are all telling a single, long story arc across the length of the season. While a fine idea in theory, that sort of aspect lends itself poorly to a compartmentalized release schedule like this. Many times my players were continuously surprised by amazing "sudden" appearances in the area -- such as the Hospice, or even the Giant Foreboding Ruined Manorhouse overlooking the village from the top of the cliffside -- because the elements are only mentioned in the modules that they appear in specifically. Even the population is getting bigger as time goes one, it seems. The first couple of mods seem to imply there's just a handful of villagers living there, but we're up to practically a thriving town, it feels like, near the end. These are all things that are easily understood to 'be there, but not important at the moment' if something like this were, say, a hardback adventure, with all the pertinent info at the end in some appendix. Unfortunately, with the shifting info being doled at per module on a need-to-know basis, it becomes very disjointing for players and characters alike.

The lack of 'portability' in this Season 4, however, is by far the least-liked aspect, by both myself and our players, and has been directly responsible for a rather dramatic reduction in the number of players we get at the gamestore anymore. By being 'locked' into the season's mods by virtue of playing them, we've had very few individuals who want to 'hop in' to a game, like we had in seasons past -- because they have no idea if they'd be able to make the adventure that allows them to escape. Recent revisions to the campaign rules allowing for other possible escape routes are a nice attempt to rectify that, but for several of our players, it's too little too late. Our numbers have dwindled by half over the course of Season 4 explicitly due to this fact, and we're hoping that with the arrival of Season 5, we'll be able to get some of those players back. Mind you, we're just a small gamestore running AL stuff when we can here, so we're often struggling to get a legal table some weekends anymore. We don't have the luxury of having so many players that we can often re-run mods a second time anymore (what with everyone's oddball schedules, etc.). In seasons past, we could often run a mod a second time with new players if we had them, but with the 'being locked' aspect of Season 4, people aren't even willing to try it, for fear of having their characters lost with no likelihood of the 'escape mods' showing up. Again, some other escape routes have been added, but not in time to rescue the interest of some of our players (and for those that tout the accessibility of online play to take care of any gaps, that's a poor option for many players, for a variety of reasons).

The greatest irony, I fear, is that all of these potential issues had even been brought up on the forums well before Season 4 had been announced, as several of us had been talking about the possibility of seeing WotC put out a 5th-edition Ravenlift revamp.

Regardless, while I feel Season 4 was a noble experiment, I would not, personally, call it a successful one by any means. Going forward, I hope to see some aspects -- such as non-portability -- buried in an unmarked grave somewhere, and at the same time hope to see some of the more successful aspect being delivered in a more player-friendly method in Seasons to come.
 

kalani

Villager
The yuan-ti aren't native to Barovia. Those specific individuals are native to the Glumpen Swamp, which was pulled into Barovia along with a large chunk of the MoonSea - so you are correct that they had no business being there, but they took advantage of this fact regardless.
 
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RulesJD

Villager
The yuan-ti aren't native to Barovia. Those specific individuals are native to the Glumpen Swamp, which was pulled into Barovia along with a large chunk of the MoonSea - so you are correct that they had no business being there, but they took advantage of this fact regardless.
Understable misunderstanding. "Not belonging there" was more in reference to the "wtf are snake people doing in Barovia?" all my players did regardless of the explanation about being "pulled" in. Same for the Elven "village" that either does or does not exist depending on which module you're playing.
 

jasper

Rotten DM
I found a version of DMG Al version 4.0 which gives the dark gifts, and Granny Jenny Clampett spell cost to include down time days. And I can see why ANY AL will have hard time doing a season long story line. Maybe an online story/newspaper which gives the flavor text and some stories happening between adventures.
 

Pauper

Villager
On the one hand, the whole season is just dripping with flavor and atmosphere. That's a good thing, and it's been the number one aspect that our group has liked.
I'll agree to a point -- the inclusion of yuan-ti and orcs did take my group out of the setting -- but for the most part, until you get to the last couple of adventures, the modules do feel mostly like Gothic horror, save for The Innocent.

As to the quality of the mods, I've found those to be about on-par with most of the ones in previous seasons -- a few good, a few bad, most middling, and the majority fraught with varying degrees of just shoddy editing.
Agreed -- I think a number of folks criticizing Season 4 don't seem to recall the adventures in the other seasons, particularly Season 3, that weren't all that impressive. The reason is that they might well not have played those mods, though -- in Season 4, you really had no choice but to play all the mods, even if some weren't all that exciting.

Many times my players were continuously surprised by amazing "sudden" appearances in the area -- such as the Hospice, or even the Giant Foreboding Ruined Manorhouse overlooking the village from the top of the cliffside -- because the elements are only mentioned in the modules that they appear in specifically. Even the population is getting bigger as time goes one, it seems.
Absolutely agree -- this is one of the major flaws of the handling of the Orasnou setting in Season 4. Though I understand why the admins might not wanted to have released a more complete 'Guide to Orasnou' at the start of the season -- it would have necessarily contained some spoilers, for instance -- the lack of such a guide meant that the DM has no real alternative but to read each module in advance before running any of them, in order to know what is around for the PCs to interact with during each module. It's relatively nice that the modules focus on the areas that are important to that module -- it helps the DM know that anything not mentioned in the module can be glossed over if the PCs ask about it -- but the constant stream of 'oh, I guess you didn't notice this significant thing about the village and its inhabitants' throughout the first half of the season in particular must have been very irritating to a DM who ran the modules as soon as they came out and didn't have the opportunity to 'read ahead'.

The lack of 'portability' in this Season 4, however, is by far the least-liked aspect, by both myself and our players, and has been directly responsible for a rather dramatic reduction in the number of players we get at the game store anymore.
I can see where, in your situation, this would be an issue, but I don't see this as a problem with the season as a whole.

By being 'locked' into the season's mods by virtue of playing them, we've had very few individuals who want to 'hop in' to a game, like we had in seasons past -- because they have no idea if they'd be able to make the adventure that allows them to escape.
The obvious solution is to create characters specifically for Season 4 -- which isn't much of a stretch, as each season starts out with a level 1-2 mod exclusive to it which assumes you're starting a new character for that season already.

The advantage of such a system is that it purported to solve one of the major issues with the Season 3 hardcover -- if you were playing Out of the Abyss, the campaign rules explicitly allowed you to visit a shop or other location between adventures to purchase gear, which, unless the DM enforced a rule preventing it, basically defeated the purpose of the 'survival horror' aspect of the hardcover module. If anything, the 'trapped in Barovia' mechanic didn't go far enough, because even though the characters couldn't leave Barovia, there are still locations in Barovia that the PCs can use to resupply using the generic AL rule on re-equipping between adventures, thus side-stepping things like the 'You Murderer!' story award meant to penalize players for thoughtless violence.

I'd hate to see the campaign abandon such plotlines simply because of a fear that some locations will have difficulty implementing them in a way that satisfies a more casual playerbase.

Going forward, I hope to see some aspects -- such as non-portability -- buried in an unmarked grave somewhere, and at the same time hope to see some of the more successful aspect being delivered in a more player-friendly method in Seasons to come.
Should the admins decide to pursue this sort of tightly-connected adventure plotline in the future, I'd prefer to see an up-front admission that, if you are running AL in an environment that promotes more casual play, you should focus on a different season of AL adventures or run the hardcover adventure, if you are focused on playing out the current season anyway. This would free up the admins to make an adventure plotline that would be truly challenging to dedicated players, and likely be extremely memorable for that set of the playerbase.

--
Pauper
 

Pauper

Villager
The yuan-ti aren't native to Barovia. Those specific individuals are native to the Glumpen Swamp.
As far as I'm aware, based on previously published material regarding the Moonsea, there are no yuan-ti native to the Glumpen Swamp. The 2e supplement 'The Moonsea' makes no mention of the swamp at all, it simply details the city of Phlan itself. The 3e Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting does likewise, with the Flooded Forest near Cormanthor being the only swamp mentioned. The 3e hardcover 'Mysteries of the Moonsea' doesn't even cover Phlan, focusing on Melvaunt and its surroundings.

Fortunately, there is a 3.5 era source that covers the yuan-ti extensively: Serpent Kingdoms, a late 3.5 era hardcover. In fact, there's an entire chapter devoted to the areas where the serpentfolk have settled and made into strongholds. There are many in and near the Chultan Peninsula, a couple in the Western Heartlands (the yuan-ti nation of Najara and the ancient sarrukh nation of Isstosseffifil nestled between the Anauroch desert and the High Ice). There's even a listing of 'other holdings' that includes yuan-ti outposts in Waterdeep (Skullport and the Slitherswamp, specifically) and the Vilhon Reach.

None of these are anywhere near the Moonsea. The Vilhon Reach is as far south of the Sea of Fallen Stars as the Moonsea is north of it, and Najara, the closest yuan-ti holding, is hundreds if not thousands of miles to the southeast, on the other side of Anauroch.

Either the admins have made a change to the setting to establish yuan-ti in the Moonsea near Phlan, or the admins had the Dark Powers snatch the yuan-ti from a different location (likely Najara, given the age of the described structures in the relevant Season 4 modules) to foreshadow their appearance in future modules. The latter seems more likely, given that future seasons will be set along the Sword Coast, which is not nearly as far from Najara. (Adventurers travelling from Waterdeep to Baldur's Gate along the main trade route will pass within a few leagues of the Serpent Hills, for example.)

I'll gladly retract my objection if someone can point me toward an official source that establishes yuan-ti in the Glumpen Swamp prior to 5th edition. (And, if the source turns out to be Volo's Guide to Monsters, that will say something interesting about the admins' protests that they don't get to review manuscripts prior to publication.)

--
Pauper
 
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CapnZapp

Adventurer
As far as I'm aware, based on previously published material regarding the Moonsea, there are no yuan-ti native to the Glumpen Swamp. The 2e supplement 'The Moonsea' makes no mention of the swamp at all, it simply details the city of Phlan itself. The 3e Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting does likewise, with the Flooded Forest near Cormanthor being the only swamp mentioned. The 3e hardcover 'Mysteries of the Moonsea' doesn't even cover Phlan, focusing on Melvaunt and its surroundings.

Fortunately, there is a 3.5 era source that covers the yuan-ti extensively: Serpent Kingdoms, a late 3.5 era hardcover. In fact, there's an entire chapter devoted to the areas where the serpentfolk have settled and made into strongholds. There are many in and near the Chultan Peninsula, a couple in the Western Heartlands (the yuan-ti nation of Najara and the ancient sarrukh nation of Isstosseffifil nestled between the Anauroch desert and the High Ice). There's even a listing of 'other holdings' that includes yuan-ti outposts in Waterdeep (Skullport and the Slitherswamp, specifically) and the Vilhon Reach.

None of these are anywhere near the Moonsea. The Vilhon Reach is as far south of the Sea of Fallen Stars as the Moonsea is north of it, and Najara, the closest yuan-ti holding, is hundreds if not thousands of miles to the southeast, on the other side of Anauroch.

Either the admins have made a change to the setting to establish yuan-ti in the Moonsea near Phlan, or the admins had the Dark Powers snatch the yuan-ti from a different location (likely Najara, given the age of the described structures in the relevant Season 4 modules) to foreshadow their appearance in future modules. The latter seems more likely, given that future seasons will be set along the Sword Coast, which is not nearly as far from Najara. (Adventurers travelling from Waterdeep to Baldur's Gate along the main trade route will pass within a few leagues of the Serpent Hills, for example.)

I'll gladly retract my objection if someone can point me toward an official source that establishes yuan-ti in the Glumpen Swamp prior to 5th edition. (And, if the source turns out to be Volo's Guide to Monsters, that will say something interesting about the admins' protests that they don't get to review manuscripts prior to publication.)

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Pauper
Sorry but now I gotta speak up. You seem to suffer some kind of delusion that says it is impossible to change up any of the Realmslore, the way you treat it as some kind of error or mistake to introduce new threats to regions that previously hadn't seen them.

I'm sorry for having to say this - but that's balderdash.


You write "the admins have made a change to the setting to establish yuan-ti in the Moonsea near Phlan" like a hypothetical. It is not. It's right in there in the module. You keep on as if that's only one out of several explanations, making something big out of something rather minor.

There's yuan-ti in the Glumpen Swamp. So what? Stranger things have definitely happened in the Realms... :hmm:
 

jasper

Rotten DM
Thanks for the reminder Capn Zapp, I need to photo copy my update map of Orasnou which has most of places marked from the modules. Currently I am imposing the 10 and 5 gp shopping limit on all the players. I am also tracking and add days to calendar. So tonight it will Oct 1, 1492. But the players started on Sept 9, 1492. I am enforcing a 1.5 gp per day expense cost. And the count currently is Orasnou villagers 198 down from 200. PCs killed 1. Monsters Killed 30. The village count will go down again tonight and monsters up. But some of village facts should have been in module 2 even if was not necessary till much later.
If you are on Facebook, the Montgomery Adventure league page may be open to be read. This where I advertise the upcoming game, and do a brief after game report.
As to the lore/canon/etc. I have never let that bother my changes during any additional.
 

Steve_MND

Villager
Sorry, but you've lost me. Do you mean the fact you can't escape the domain and how that means you can't just hop between adventures?
Yes, the idea that you can take your character to any AL-legal table, anywhere in the world, and sit down and play any AL-legal mod. That portability is one of the core concepts behind the development of what we now call "Organized Play' (as opposed to home games people might run). The Ravenloft Lock meant that otherwise viable characters were prevented from being able to be played in other modules. If you had a 6th-level character in Ravenloft, for example, and the convention/gameday/whatever you were at was playing a Mid-Tier Season Two mod that you had not played in before, you could not play in that now. Previously, that had not been an issue.

I can see where, in your situation, this would be an issue, but I don't see this as a problem with the season as a whole.
Well, I happen to view portability as one of the main tenets that Organized Play is supposed to be built around, and once you start getting rid of that, you're crippling the entire idea behind why OP was created in the first place. Of course, my origins in OP stem from the heyday of the RPGA, some 20 years ago, so while I'll admit that times change, I won't agree that getting rid of portability in an entire season is good for the health of any OP campaign. Case in point: Season 4 has managed to drop our attendance at AL games down to about half of what it once was, and while I am sure our relatively small gaming population might have exacerbated the issue, I cannot legitimately imagine that our store is the only one in the country that's had that same problem.

The obvious solution is to create characters specifically for Season 4 -- which isn't much of a stretch, as each season starts out with a level 1-2 mod exclusive to it which assumes you're starting a new character for that season already.
Sorry, I thought the context was there to make it clear that it wasn't so much the first half of the season that was the main problem (altho you may be surprised at how few players want to just 'play a character' if they don't think they'll ever be able to do anything with them again). I was referring more to the latter half, where we had a number of potential players with earlier mid-tier characters that could have joined in, had the season's portability been the same as earlier ones. But since several of them had erratic work schedules, etc., they didn't want to risk playing a favorite character only to have it likely locked for who-knows-how-long just because they missed the module(s) that allowed them to leave. Again, some other options were added near the end of the season, but for several of our players, it was too little too late for them to bother with.

And honestly, between the execution of Season Four and our less-than-impressive dealings with Baldman at this summer's GenCon, most of the 'core group' of gamers in our area are moving more towards other, indie games and campaigns. And as mentioned before, while I admit our relatively small population might have exacerbated the issue, I cannot legitimately imagine that our gamers are the only ones that are having those same concerns.

The advantage of such a system is that it purported to solve one of the major issues with the Season 3 hardcover -- if you were playing Out of the Abyss, the campaign rules explicitly allowed you to visit a shop or other location between adventures to purchase gear, which, unless the DM enforced a rule preventing it, basically defeated the purpose of the 'survival horror' aspect of the hardcover module. If anything, the 'trapped in Barovia' mechanic didn't go far enough, because even though the characters couldn't leave Barovia, there are still locations in Barovia that the PCs can use to resupply using the generic AL rule on re-equipping between adventures, thus side-stepping things like the 'You Murderer!' story award meant to penalize players for thoughtless violence.
See, I don't have a problem with the 'survival horror' aspect of it. I understand Ravenloft, and I understand the importance of the Mists, etc. I agree with all of that. That said, that very exclusionary nature of the setting said to me that "hey, this is a poor choice of setting to add to an already existing, ongoing campaign, as no-one likes when the rules are changed out from underneath them." I also understand that AL is just a marketing arm of WotC, and so they have to focus around whatever seasonal product WotC is pushing out as their latest hardcover. It's an awkward, narrow edge the campaign is forced to walk, and i do not envy the people that have to make those decisions at all, because there is no black-and-white choice.

A similar situation occurred in the previous Season with the Madness rules being introduced. Lovecraftian horror is great, and a favorite of mine. But adding such elements in the middle of an ongoing campaign, have it sweep through like some horrific windstorm, be dangerous and game-changing on a most fundamental level, and then disappear just as quickly as it arrived, is, in my personal opinion, a poor choice for any campaign, Organized or not. Fundamental concepts like that deserve to be integrated at the start of any particular campaign, and last through it fully, and not just be thrown in as some 'game mechanic flavor of the week' sort of situation.

I would have much rather seen, instead of trying to link each of these 'weekly flavors' they'd have just created a new, separate standalone campaign for that season. i would have loved to have seen a fully-Underdark campaign. I would have loved to have seen a fully-Ravenloft campaign. In the future I would love to see a fully-Spelljammer campaign, or a fully-Planescape campaign, or a fully-Athas campaign. But I do not, and would not, like to see them all crammed together into the current single monolithic AL campaign that started five seasons ago.

But of course, I also realize that's not going to be viable under the current operation of the campaign, since WotC and Hasbro has their own requirements out of AL. In fact, in a way, I can kind of see that that is how things are slowly moving -- handing Baldman the 'core' stuff to do with on their own, and then freeing up WotC to do their own flavor of the week stuff as they see fit. Two problems (in my eyes) being that the campaign is still, in theory, all still interchangeable and not separate, and that it's Baldman who is heading up the 'core' bits.

Time will see if either of those sort themselves out, but I don't know if that many of us have that much time and interest, especially as other things start looming on the horizon now that the first non-WotC 5th edition settings are starting to appear.

Again, I know that there are issues that I have that others don't, and that there are things I like that others don't, and things I hate that others don't. All I can do is explain my reasoning to those that are capable of listening and potentially sending info up the chain of command (looking at you, AL admins) and hope that they take it into consideration -- along with everyone else's -- when the next time for changes come around.
 

CapnZapp

Adventurer
Sure enough, Steve_MND, but by choosing to use a bland corporate-speak term like "non-portability" you risk giving off the impression you have intentionally ignored all aspects of actual story. Almost as if the "ravenloft lock" (a much better term, if you ask me :) ) wasn't deeply grounded in story, background, atmosphere and theme.

You would probably get more support for your position were you to say "I think Ravenloft is a poor fit for organized play because [reasons]" than pretending a completely open Ravenloft campaign is a perfectly normal thing to suggest.

Good luck with season 5! :)

Zapp
 

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