Rewatching the Batman movies


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No, he's depowered. His torture and execution is not needed. I could almost get behind it if he didn't crush the man's hand with super strength first. Superman shouldn't be making people scream in agony
I mean the new movie, not the old one. I suspect you're right about the old one.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I don't care to much about the details there's good Batman (1989, 1992, Darknight Trilogy etc) and bad batman (Batman and Robin).
 

I just showed the Keaton Batman to a friend of mine who had never seen it. She loved it. Keaton is great, but Jack really steals the show. The plot is a bit messy, but Nicholson is given so much freedom that he is a joy to watch. I wonder how many of his lines were improv. Also, the movie is gorgeous to look at, even if Gotham city seems to have only one set, and we are shown the Monarch Theater so many times. The music is still the definitive Batman theme for me, what a score! My favourite shot in the film is the Batwing flying up in front of the moon, it always makes me laugh. There are some very obvious miniatures during the end sequence but that's alright.

Watching these Burton films made me realize just how many scenes are repeated in the Nolan films.

The Joker doesn't care about money
In Tim Burton's Batman, we are shown the Joker throwing away money during the parade scene.
In Nolan's The Dark Knight, the Joker burns a huge pile of money.

The Joker sends out a television message to the people of Gotham
In Burton's Batman, The Joker sends out a television message, challenging Batman to reveal his true face.
In Nolan's The Dark Knight, The Joker does exactly the same. Threatening to kill more people unless Batman reveals himself.

Love interest learns Bruce's identity through a familiar phrase
In Burton's Batman Returns, Selina learns Bruce's secret identity through the phase: "Mistletoe can be deadly if you eat it." "But a kiss can be even deadlier if you mean it."
In Nolan's Batman Begins, Rachel learns of Bruce's secret identity through the phrase: "It is not who I am underneath, but what I do that defines me."

The Batmobile transforms into other vehicle
In Burton's Batman Returns, the batmobile discards most of it's body to transform into a small pod.
In Nolan's The Dark Knight, a destroyed batmobile self destructs after ejecting the batpod.

Joker falls to his death
In Burton's Batman, the Joker fall to his death (twice).
In Nolan's The Dark Knight, the Joker falls to his death, but Batman catches him.

The Joker walks into a mob meeting and kills a mobster
In Burton's Batman, The Joker electrocutes a mobster with a handshake and takes over their operation.
In Nolan's The Dark Knight, The Joker kills a mobster with his pencil trick, and persuates them to join him.

Batman crashes during the final confrontation with the Joker
In Burton's Batman, the Batwing misses every shot at the Joker and crashes after being shot down.
In Nolan's the Dark Knight, Batman chooses to miss the Joker and crashes the Batpod.

I'm Batman!
Quoted both in Burton's Batman, and in Nolan's Batman Begins, and both to a random thug.

Batman takes his love interest to the Batcave
In Burton's Batman, he takes Vicky to the Batcave in the Batmobile, after saving her from the Joker.
In Nolan's Batman Begins, he takes Rachel to the Batcave in the Batmobile to save her life.
(Also, both love interests receive an antidote to a toxin central to the plot)
 
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ccs

41st lv DM
Watching these Burton films made me realize just how many scenes are repeated in the Nolan films.

The Joker doesn't care about money
In Tim Burton's Batman, we are shown the Joker throwing away money during the parade scene.
In Nolan's The Dark Knight, the Joker burns a huge pile of money.

True, they both have scenes involving $.
But in the Keaton movie Jokers not throwing it away because he doesn't care about it. He's SPENDING it. He's baiting the trap. He's trying to draw as many people into his Joker gas attack as possible. Wich in turn will draw out Batman.
 

True, they both have scenes involving $.
But in the Keaton movie Jokers not throwing it away because he doesn't care about it. He's SPENDING it. He's baiting the trap. He's trying to draw as many people into his Joker gas attack as possible. Wich in turn will draw out Batman.

The way I always read the parade scene, it is a bit of both. The Joker doesn't seem to care at all about the money that he is handing out, but he is of course using it to lure the unsuspecting public to their death, and to draw Batman out.

Similarly, in the Dark Knight, the Joker seems to be using his attack on Harvey Dent to draw Batman out. When Batman does show up, he doesn't seem the least bit surprised. Although arguably, Batman and commisioner Gordon are also using Harvey Dent to draw out the Joker.

Watching the Nolan Batman films, it feels like watching a bit of a remix of things we've seen before in the Burton Batman movies, although with a much more serious and grounded approach.
 
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Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
True, they both have scenes involving $.
But in the Keaton movie Jokers not throwing it away because he doesn't care about it. He's SPENDING it. He's baiting the trap. He's trying to draw as many people into his Joker gas attack as possible. Wich in turn will draw out Batman.
In fact, IIRC it wasn’t real money. It had a Joker face on it. Or am I misremembering?
 

In fact, IIRC it wasn’t real money. It had a Joker face on it. Or am I misremembering?
I think you are misremembering. We are never shown a close up of the money in the parade scene, but according to official prop collectors, the money looks like normal dollar bills (but labeled Motion Picture Use Only on both sides). The Joker does have a ton of other products during the movie that bare his face.

Also, there is a line in the film where the Joker says he'd like to have his face on a one dollar bill.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I think you are misremembering. We are never shown a close up of the money in the parade scene, but according to official prop collectors, the money looks like normal dollar bills (but labeled Motion Picture Use Only on both sides). The Joker does have a ton of other products during the movie that bare his face.

Also, there is a line in the film where the Joker says he'd like to have his face on a one dollar bill.
Ah, found it. It's in the novelization, and the original script, but not actually shown onscreen. It's the punchline to the line you refer to where earlier in the film he says he wants his face on the one-dollar bill. Apparently it is in a brief deleted scene.

Here's part of the film's script:


ANGLE ON MAN IN CROWD

Looking at his money. The green comes off on his hands.

MAN
What is this stuff?

TIGHT ON MONEY

A hand rubs the green dye off and we see underneath.
JOKER MONEY, with JOKER'S FACE on the one-dollar bill.

BACK TO SCENE

CROWD
(CHORUS OF ANGER)
This stuff is fake!
 


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