D&D 5E Starting Equipment/Gold Question

Tigit

Explorer
I have a question about starting Gold and Equipment. I you take the option of rolling your gold instead of the starting Class Equipment does that mean you lose the starting equipment from the background or is that separate?
 

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Hriston

Dungeon Master of Middle-earth
Under "Backgrounds" on page 60 of the SRD 5.1:
Equipment
Each background provides a package of starting​
equipment. If you use the optional rule to spend coin​
on gear, you do not receive the starting equipment​
from your background.​
 

Tigit

Explorer
Under "Backgrounds" on page 60 of the SRD 5.1:
Equipment
Each background provides a package of starting​
equipment. If you use the optional rule to spend coin​
on gear, you do not receive the starting equipment​
from your background.​
Okay. Was just unsure because the back ground gives items with no real value such as poorly wrought maps from your homeland. Thank you.
 

Hriston

Dungeon Master of Middle-earth
Okay. Was just unsure because the back ground gives items with no real value such as poorly wrought maps from your homeland. Thank you.
It isn't necessarily a replacement because you can get one anyway, but similar items can be found on the Trinkets table.
 

DND_Reborn

The High Aldwin
I will add that for many classes, taking the starting equipment and background packages is "worth more" than if you roll and try to buy all the same things--often you just can't.

If you find this is an issue, simply allow maximum starting gold instead of rolling.
 

Tigit

Explorer
I will add that for many classes, taking the starting equipment and background packages is "worth more" than if you roll and try to buy all the same things--often you just can't.

If you find this is an issue, simply allow maximum starting gold instead of rolling.
In my case it was mainly the character needed a heavy crossbow instead of the longbow that was given and he had a choice of taking scalemail but studded leather made better sense. In terms of gold, the longbow and the crossbow both cost 50 gp and the studded leather costs 5 gp less than the scalemail. At first level 1 extra point of damage or 1 extra point of ac can make a big difference.
 
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DND_Reborn

The High Aldwin
In my case it was mainly the character needed a heavy crossbow instead of the longbow that was given and he had a choice of taking scalemail but studded leather made better sense. In terms of gold, the longbow and the crossbow both cost 50 gp and the studded leather costs 5 gp less than the scalemail. At first level 1 extra point of damage or 1 extra point of ac can make a big difference.
As others have mentioned, just swapping out items like that is simple enough IME.

But I am more curious, why was a heavy crossbow "needed"? Why did studded leather "make more sense" than scale mail?

(FYI, "studded leather" was never even a real armor... Ringed leather was and would be better if you want "realism" in the game...).
 

Tigit

Explorer
As others have mentioned, just swapping out items like that is simple enough IME.

But I am more curious, why was a heavy crossbow "needed"? Why did studded leather "make more sense" than scale mail?

(FYI, "studded leather" was never even a real armor... Ringed leather was and would be better if you want "realism" in the game...).
Playing a Dwarf Ranger and the Heavy Crossbow just seemed to fit better with the character. As far as the Studded leather, No dex cap and no stealth disadvantage. The other option was leather armor which is 1 points less than studded.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Okay. Was just unsure because the back ground gives items with no real value such as poorly wrought maps from your homeland. Thank you.

Several backgrounds give equipment of significant value, though, and some even give you outright cash.
 

DND_Reborn

The High Aldwin
Playing a Dwarf Ranger and the Heavy Crossbow just seemed to fit better with the character. As far as the Studded leather, No dex cap and no stealth disadvantage. The other option was leather armor which is 1 points less than studded.
See, to my mind the Dwarf with a Heavy Crossbow is "typical" of the Dwarven warrior and soo "fits better" due to the stereotype.

The longbow you can eventually fire twice without needing the Crossbow Expert feat due to the loading property of the crossbow... And he can start with leather, and buy studded leather after the adventure begins, giving the player something to work for.

But, as I said swapping out such things is very reasonable if you don't want to bother with rolling for starting gold.
 


Mad_Jack

Hero
As a DM, I'd have no problem with you adding up the total cost of the gear you got from your class list and background, and just using that amount of gold to buy the starting gear you wanted.
 

Tigit

Explorer
See, to my mind the Dwarf with a Heavy Crossbow is "typical" of the Dwarven warrior and soo "fits better" due to the stereotype.

The longbow you can eventually fire twice without needing the Crossbow Expert feat due to the loading property of the crossbow... And he can start with leather, and buy studded leather after the adventure begins, giving the player something to work for.

But, as I said swapping out such things is very reasonable if you don't want to bother with rolling for starting gold.
Playing against type is fun but some things just make sense. While elves are known for there bows, dwarves are known for crafting metal, be it armor or metal weapons. So growing up using a crossbow instead of a bow makes sense, eventually 1+1 still equals 2.
 


DND_Reborn

The High Aldwin
Playing against type is fun but some things just make sense. While elves are known for there bows, dwarves are known for crafting metal, be it armor or metal weapons. So growing up using a crossbow instead of a bow makes sense, eventually 1+1 still equals 2.
Actually, dwarves are known as excellent craftsmen, whether metal, gemstones, stonework, wood, brewing, or whatever. Saying they are only known for crafting metal just enforces the stereotype. This is why "some things just make sense" to you and/or the player.

Also, whose to say this dwarf didn't have access to a bow (found, bought, traded for, etc.) and realized its superiority to the crossbows used by other dwarves, and so mastered how to use it? Rangers are proficient in all weapons, after all, so this dwarf knows how to use a bow anyway.

Of course, it could start with the crossbow instead of a bow, and then purchase and use a bow later on, just as it could only have leather armor and buy studded leather after getting some gold...
 

Bill Zebub

“It’s probably Matt Mercer’s fault.”
(FYI, "studded leather" was never even a real armor... Ringed leather was and would be better if you want "realism" in the game...).


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These gentlemen would like a word with you.

Out back.
 


I stopped caring a long time ago what equipment my players choose at PC creation and from session to session. This is all within reason, and magical items are not allowed unless I specifically allow them. Shopping for a long sword in game is not something I want to do anymore at this point in my life. I decided that it's reasonable to assume that adventurers are going to be adequately equipped at 1st level and thereafter as they advance through their adventuring career, so we generally don't keep track of resources such as that. I came up with a percentile table ranging from mundane, common, rare and unique items that I can roll on in the event the players come across a situation where a certain item would come in useful. I think it's safe to say that characters are going to come across, pick up and keep random things; so, it's not a stretch for me to just say yes/no or roll on my table when a player asks if they might have a piece of equipment in their possession. Again, all within reason and this works for us better than meticulously tracking inventory. Although this reminds me of a funny story. One player in our 2E days was new to the game and we walked him through PC creation and then left him alone to choose his gear. Turns out he bought a 128 cu. ft. cord of firewood and put it in his backpack. Needless to say we laughed for quite a while over this.
 

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