The Camlann Chronicles Kickstarter - Welsh Arthurian Campaign for 5e and the Lore 100 System - Kickstarter now live

Jiaxingseng

Villager
Kickstarter Link

Camlann Chronicles is a Welsh and Brythonic themed campaign for both 5th edition and the Lore 100 System, by Sons of the Singularity.

King Aedan is a broad-shouldered man in his early twenties. His loosely fitting tunic depicts a white bear on a field of royal blue; a sword hangs at his side. For nearly a year now, King Aedan has worn an unkempt beard and a distant look of sadness that came upon him after the death of his father, King Uther. You vividly remember the announcement of King Uther’s death as it echoed off the walls and corridors of Castle Camlann, “The King is dead; long live the King!”

The Camlann Chronicles weaves together Arthurian legends and fantasy RPG tropes. Fledgling kingdoms, including the likes of Gwynedd, Rheged and Dyfed, fight amongst themselves for control of the mythic British Isle. The nobility of these fledgling kingdoms share the common dream of a united realm; though they are unwilling to bend their own knee.

The Camlann Chronicles includes:

  • 4 full scenarios; 12+ game sessions
  • At least 10 pre-generated player characters
  • Settings section for a fantastical rendering of Welsh and Brythonic Britain.
  • Description of important NPCs
  • Designed for 5e gameplay, with optional rules for incorporating character background
  • VAR_not_on_DnD Includes the Lore 100 RPG system
I'm not the writer for this project but I know a lot about it. I also created the Lore 100 system. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.
 

Weiley31

Adventurer
Kickstarter Link

Camlann Chronicles is a Welsh and Brythonic themed campaign for both 5th edition and the Lore 100 System, by Sons of the Singularity.

King Aedan is a broad-shouldered man in his early twenties. His loosely fitting tunic depicts a white bear on a field of royal blue; a sword hangs at his side. For nearly a year now, King Aedan has worn an unkempt beard and a distant look of sadness that came upon him after the death of his father, King Uther. You vividly remember the announcement of King Uther’s death as it echoed off the walls and corridors of Castle Camlann, “The King is dead; long live the King!”

The Camlann Chronicles weaves together Arthurian legends and fantasy RPG tropes. Fledgling kingdoms, including the likes of Gwynedd, Rheged and Dyfed, fight amongst themselves for control of the mythic British Isle. The nobility of these fledgling kingdoms share the common dream of a united realm; though they are unwilling to bend their own knee.

The Camlann Chronicles includes:

  • 4 full scenarios; 12+ game sessions
  • At least 10 pre-generated player characters
  • Settings section for a fantastical rendering of Welsh and Brythonic Britain.
  • Description of important NPCs
  • Designed for 5e gameplay, with optional rules for incorporating character background
  • VAR_not_on_DnD Includes the Lore 100 RPG system
I'm not the writer for this project but I know a lot about it. I also created the Lore 100 system. If you have any questions, please feel free to ask.
I'm sorry, is that a FLIPPING KNIGHT SURFING ON A GIANT MAGIC CARP!!????
 

Warren Ellis

Explorer
1) Surfing Knight on the Carp is great. :D

2) Honestly, this seems more interesting for the fact it isn't another 5e D&D 3PP setting that is Viking-inspired.

You don't really see Welsh Arthur much.

Everything in popular fiction seems to mostly be based on the Mallory version or whatever the one with Lancelot & Galahad are.
 

Jiaxingseng

Villager
Everything in popular fiction seems to mostly be based on the Mallory version or whatever the one with Lancelot & Galahad are.
Yeah, I think that's because the French stuff is more romantic. We felt that the mystical elements are a better fit for D&D. Also, the later stuff is more rooted in a false history, while Welsh is rooted in mythology.

This weekend I'm going to release a beta-package that contains the first chapter (actually the first 2 chapters, but chapter 1 is more like a session 0 scenario. Hope you can have a look and tell me what you think then.
 

Warren Ellis

Explorer
Yeah, I think that's because the French stuff is more romantic. We felt that the mystical elements are a better fit for D&D. Also, the later stuff is more rooted in a false history, while Welsh is rooted in mythology.
Does that mean stuff like equipment & currency, and lifestyle expenses regarding currency, may be different from the default D&D 5e assumptions in the SRD?
 

Warren Ellis

Explorer

Jiaxingseng

Villager
Does that mean stuff like equipment & currency, and lifestyle expenses regarding currency, may be different from the default D&D 5e assumptions in the SRD?
No. Sorry. I wanted to do that. If we get around to "Season 2" of Camlann Chronicles (which is already mostly written), I may implement this. We decided that it would help with 5e fans to keep that with what they know. I also wanted to change "long sword" into "great sword", because 2 handed swords (besides being extremely rare until it became a rage in 14th century duelling circles) are what is called "Long Sword".
 

Warren Ellis

Explorer
No. Sorry. I wanted to do that. If we get around to "Season 2" of Camlann Chronicles (which is already mostly written), I may implement this. We decided that it would help with 5e fans to keep that with what they know. I also wanted to change "long sword" into "great sword", because 2 handed swords (besides being extremely rare until it became a rage in 14th century duelling circles) are what is called "Long Sword".
That's kind of unfortunate. Well hopefully, you'll be able to implement those changes into Season 2, fro what you've said.

Because it would be kind of neat to see these little touches to show that this isn't your standard generic medieval fantasy setting.

Like it was neat with how Dark Sun did changes like that, for example.
 

Jiaxingseng

Villager
Because it would be kind of neat to see these little touches to show that this isn't your standard generic medieval fantasy setting.
So, full disclosure. I'm not the writer or project manager for this product. My company is two people; my partner Jason Sheets is the main writer; in this project I contribute the non-written content and the Lore 100 System. And the Lore Sheets. Anyway, I'll talk over your suggestion with Jason.

Personally, I don't care about costs. But I guess this is an important thing for D&D players? (Actual question... I don't know). A lot of GMs (like Jason) are able to quickly spit out a cost for players because over the years they have done it so many times that they know how much, say, a long sword costs.

When I was making the costs lists for Lore 100, I was basing that on D&D so that we don't need to change a lot of text. But as I was looking at the D&D equipment list I thought, "wow, this makes no sense whatsoever." I'm not talking about the use of gold; I'm talking about the relative value of items. A spear is 1gp while a dagger is 2 gp, for example. Long bows costing more than long swords.

To make the change, I believe I would need to change the relative pricing of weapons in D&D. Which, maybe, is a no-no with some fans. I would then need to change descriptions of gold to silver, and silver to copper. Not a big deal but does take some time. Then I would build out a price list based on medieval pricing. Two problems with this: 1) the game is a fantasy game which nominally takes place in the 5th century, a time where we know very little about, and 2) does this potentially invalidate any other D&D mechanic which is normally used in the "progression curve" of players. I myself don't care about either of these problems because I don't feel a need for historical accuracy and I care about story progression, not PC power level progression. But many players, customers, and backers may feel differently. What do you think about this?
 

Jiaxingseng

Villager
Hey all. Today I'm releasing a demo package of the first two chapters, which includes a stand-alone adventure: "The Little People Problem".

The King takes a position on the stage and calls to order the council.
“Yesterday, I accepted petitions from my subjects throughout the lands. Three of these petitions bear further consideration. I call upon you to provide me with counsel.”
“The first petitioner was dispatched by Lord Vortigern of Dyfed. He claims “little folk” are stealing children from houses in Moridunum and replacing them with changelings. He demands we dispatch help in the form of military aid immediately.”
“The second petitioner hails from Pengwern. Though he does not speak on behalf of Lord Brochwel of Powys, he swears upon his own life that the dead walk the ruins of the Wrekin.”
“The third petitioner sends word from Lord Caradoc of Dumnonia. He says that the flowers of March have blossomed and that the annual boar hunt will be held on the next full moon. He asks that the King and his contingent join.”

You can download the sample at this Google Drive link.
 

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