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The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance | Trailer | Netflix

Janx

Adventurer
I watched the entire series over the course of the long weekend, and I really liked it. This is after watching the movie last week in preparation.

I too thought that some of what they did in the first few episodes was contradictory to what happens in the movie, but later in the series, things start lining up a bit more. My only (minor) complaint is the extra emphasis on Augrha and the fact that she's this uber-character similar to Elminster or Gandalf. Again, though, it's only a minor quibble.

I really liked the fact that at one point in the series, you can actually see the D&D party being formed. You can look at it and say, "There's the fighter, there's the barbarian, the podling is the paladin...that guy right there is definitely the bard...oh, and she's the druid."
Good to know I wasn't totally wrong. I didn't think it was a deal breaker, and I knew they'd obfuscate the the Skeksis origin, but it didn't seem quite right.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
My only (minor) complaint is the extra emphasis on Augrha and the fact that she's this uber-character similar to Elminster or Gandalf. Again, though, it's only a minor quibble.
If this seems out of left field, I believe her status was established in the comics, and isn't something they did just for the series.
 

Raunalyn

Explorer
If this seems out of left field, I believe her status was established in the comics, and isn't something they did just for the series.
I won't say it was out of left field, just that I thought it a very minor annoyance. Like I said, it was only a little quibble to an otherwise outstanding series.

Admittedly, the first couple of episodes were a little jarring for me; the puppetry looked very strange and slightly off kilter to the original movie. But once I got past that, it wasn't an issue and I was able to really delve into the story.
 

Tonguez

Adventurer
If this seems out of left field, I believe her status was established in the comics, and isn't something they did just for the series.
The Dark Crystal: Creation Myths graphic novel established that Aughra is actually an emanation of the planet Thra with the task of observing for the planet, having the ability to remove her eyes to extend her view of her surroundings.
 

Aldarc

Adventurer
This Dark Crystal fan finally finished the series, and I'm ready to discuss.

But the initial premise as explained by Sigourney Weaver feels a bit contradictory to the movie
The prologue said the Skeksis showed up from another world and then distracted Augrha with an Orery and then took over the crystal.

It's not deal breaking, but it seemed an odd way to phrase their origin, even if trying to keep the movie reveal a secret.
@Umbran does a good job of explaining this, particularly the unreliable narrator and all that: e.g., who built the Orrery? (Answer: TekTih.) However, if you were to ask SkekTek who built Aughra's Orrery, then as far as he is concerned, he did. He would not be entirely wrong, though its not entirely right either.

I would note that the opening narration of the Dark Crystal movie also does not tip its hand by prematurely revealing the prior existence of urSkeks. The Narrator even says that the crystal cracked and then two new races appeared (i.e., the skeksis and mystics/urRu) when in fact two new races appeared and then the crystal cracked. But as far as the gelflings were concerned, the urSkeks left and then left these new Skeksis in charge.

My only (minor) complaint is the extra emphasis on Augrha and the fact that she's this uber-character similar to Elminster or Gandalf. Again, though, it's only a minor quibble.
Aughra's importance to the world is far from a recent development - it even predates the aforementioned comic series Creation Myths - and her origins are even discussed in the book The World of the Dark Crystal (1982) that was released around the time of the original film and incidentally nominated for a Hugo. And for the longest time, this was virtually our only extra-film source of information we had about the setting. Here is an excerpt from "The Song of Aughra" in that book:
Of the race of Aughra, I, Aughra, am alone, the first and last. Born from the need for rocks and trees for an eye to see the World. The wind blew and the blind trees sang and roots twisted in the dark rocks and the roots sang and the rocks cracked and I was Aughra. This is my song. The rocks willed me to be their eye; the roots willed me to be their eye. Blind rocks that felt the heartbeat of the World; blind trees swaying in the breathing of the wind made me to view for them all the shapes of the World. Slowly, slowly the roots split the rock and I was free. The first age of Aughra was of innocence, and it was long. Then it was Aughra and the race of Gelfling who shared the world. The Gelfling sang and danced for the joy of their lives, and I was a part of that joy.​

Basically Aughra has always been an extraordinary figure in the original conception of Thra's history and mythos.​
 
I've watched the first three episodes with my daughters and have been pleasantly surprised. I am a big fan of the original film and find it to be one of the few really good fantasy films. I find that remakes and rehashes are almost always mockeries of the original (which is why I'm glad the Bryan Singer version of Excalibur never got made). But this series does a good job of honoring the vibe of the original film (if not being quite as atmospherically rich, imo), while adding a more contemporary sensibility.

Perhaps what is most impressive is the transfer from a film to a series - they've done a really good job of it.
 

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