D&D 5E The Monetization of D&D and other Role Playing Games

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
How do you know there's less DIY at individual tables? What's your source for that information? There might be more demand for official product, but maybe that's because there's much less of it than there were with other editions of D&D. Just think of the glut of products they had for 2nd edition. Were we ever a DIY hobby?

Okay.

I KNOW we were once a DIY hobby because ... there was a time when you were unable to play D&D without table modifications. The first 16 years of the hobby had the primary game that was unplayable by RAW.

Moreover, the vast majority of early TTRPGs were just people's houserules of D&D that were modified. They did ... it ... themselves. And then published the results.

I feel like ... there have been threads about this? Maybe .... a book or two?

That's kinda "res ipsa."



But sure- I have not gone to every single person's table today and verified my observation. Also, please use the spoiler block for REALLY LONG POSTS. Thanks!
 

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Let's remember the rise of the online games thanks the virtual tabletops, and maybe in a future some arcade videogames will add an optional virtual-tabletop mode.

Also there are online artists who are making money with commision drawnings, and there is demand of PC portraits. I have seen some ones in reddit.

And we have the option to use the fandom wikis as source of inspiration, because there are novels, videogames, TV shows with a very rich mythology, lore or background, and it is free. You spend money to buy the last sourcebook of Werewolf: the Apocalypse but you can read the wikis of White Wolf, or Teen Wolf if you want to surprise your players.

And the people who spend money for gits. For example I bought the book of pictures of D&D monsters for my nephews.
 


I remember reading about Planescape that it basically was a handful of people who were left alone at TSR and allowed to make this really weird stuff. It speaks to how TSR in the 90s was not very good at the whole capitalism thing--too many products, no oversight. But it's also the case that current wotc, being better at capitalism, will never make something as weird and unique on their own.

Incidentally, I don't mean to suggest that this is a resolvable problem (if it even is a problem). Really, it's about querying my own relationship to things like kickstarter, and asking myself if what I need to more content to consume (sometimes the answer might be yes) or just to sit down with a notebook and a cheap osr game and make something for myself and my friends.
 


MGibster

Legend
I KNOW we were once a DIY hobby because ... there was a time when you were unable to play D&D without table modifications. The first 16 years of the hobby had the primary game that was unplayable by RAW.
I see that less of a DIY and more of a time when it was acceptable to have a crummy products. It's like people bragging about how much better cars were because they were easier to work on while ignoring the fact that you knew they were easier to work on because they needed their first major repair before they hit 30,000 miles.

I'm getting a game with functional rules, which I would argue is an improvement. It's still a DIY game though. In my last campaign, I had a Mind Flayer who was a good guy and only ate the brains of animals. You can still run your campaign how you want.
 

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
When the current wave of D&D inevitably collapses the number of players will drastically shrink, but will leave many people looking for ways to fill the gaps - even if they have to do it themselves.
 


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