Undead Origins

Voadam

Adventurer
Villain Design Handbook
3.5
Avildar, Great Wraith: Becoming an avildar (meaning “great wraith” in Brandobian) is a tricky and involved process. It is also one of the rarer procedures, so often a villain must spend considerable time and resources even learning how to go about it. As far as anyone knows, ancient Brandobian records are the only known source of information on these creatures. Unfortunately, no one yet knows from where (or from what) the first avildar originated. The ancient Brandobian ritual to become an avildar can be learned through roleplaying or with a successful Knowledge (arcana) check (DC 30).
To gain an avildar template, the potential new undead creature needs several spells, though he need not cast all of them himself. The ceremony takes 5-8 hours and must be performed in an area sacred to the Harvester of Souls within a greater magic circle against good. The prospective avildar must spend four hours in a row reciting special prayers before casting or using any spells at all.
First, the villain must use a magic jar, entering the receptacle and returning to his body twice before continuing. Then he casts fly upon his body, hovering a few feet above the ground. He must use permanency and then enervation upon himself (to show his disdain for the world) within a three-round span of time or the entire ritual fails. Finally, he must cast gaseous form on himself. Using secret knowledge obtained in learning the ritual, he moves his gaseous form in a peculiar, swirling pattern for the remainder of the ceremony. Some speculate that the final form is a “ghostly” representation of the skull that symbolizes the Harvester of Souls. At the end of that time, the body dies and the form dissipates.
The potential new avildar must succeed at a Will save (DC 15) or permanently die. If he succeeds, he rises in 1d4 nights as a self-willed avildar.
Prerequisites: enervation, fly, gaseous form, magic jar, permanency; GP Cost: 5,000; XP Cost: 1,250.
Guraah, Self-Willed Ghoul: Becoming a guraah is relatively simple, compared to some other types of undead. First, the prospective creature that wishes to gain the guraah template must learn the appropriate ritual ceremony. This can be discovered through roleplaying or by a successful Knowledge (arcane) check (DC 25). According to rumor, the guraah (a Reanaarese word that roughly translates as “self-willed ghoul”) are frequently found in the city of Giilia as visitors, or servants, of the city’s vampire ruler, Esmaran. It is unknown if Esmaran invented the dark ritual wherein a person may magically become this type of ghoul, or if she simply discovered it in an ancient book found deep in the catacombs under the city. Regardless of its creator, the ceremony is still effective. This ceremony lasts 1d4 hours, and proceeds as follows:
First, the caster must set up a contingency spell that activates an animate dead. Then the prospective guraah casts ghoul touch upon himself, making it permanent. Any of these spells can be obtained from scrolls or items. Next, he must see to it that his body will die within 1d4 hours (often, personally slashing his wrists before exiting his corporeal form, or relying on an assistant such as an undead or construct). Finally, he must cast magic jar (through his own ability, not with a scroll or other item) and send his life force into a nearby receptacle.
At the moment of death, the caster returns from his magic jar to his body. If he succeeds at a Will save (DC 10), he gains the guraah template. The new guraah rises at the first midnight after its creation. If the caster fails his save, either the timing of his return or his preparations were off. He is now dead, not undead. Of course, he can be animated or raised like any other corpse.
Prerequisites: animate dead, contingency, ghoul touch, magic jar, permanency; GP Cost: 100 gp (magic jar focus); XP Cost: 500.
Kyseth, Great Mummy: The secrets of creating any type of kyseth (an ancient Dejy word meaning “great mummy”) have been lost to the sands of time. Sages suggest that only ancient Dejy cultures (who guarded the secrets in life and beyond the grave) knew them.
It is said that Kordalen, a Brandobian scholar, took a small band of mercanaries and other scholars deep into the Khydoban desert in hopes that he could find the fabled undead kingdom and learn the answer. Neither he nor any member of his group ever returned.
However, current sages do know that creating a kyseth requires many individuals working together, and the mummified subject has little to do beyond a certain point, as he must be killed early in the process. Some Reanaarian sages speculate it took a minimum of 90 days to create a kyseth. Of course, no modern villain with a modicum of sense would leave his fate up to underlings attempting to apply secrets of an uncertain nature. It may also be that mummification inexorably links the subject to a specific location, and such a loss of mobility interferes with one’s plans. It would be a serious weakness, as enemies can continuously assault the location until the kyseth is destroyed.
Because of these difficulties, no modern villain can easily become a kyseth. However, the template may still be applied to ancient villains who died many centuries ago.
Reliqus, Galanam: Deep with an underground maze somewhere in the Principality of Pekal, or so the legend goes, lies a sleeping lich queen and a mysterious black tome of immense power. Modern sages speculate that this queen somehow learned of (or created) a magical ritual that allows a willing spellcaster to transform himself into a reliqus (a powerful self-willed type of skeleton, also known as a “galanam” in Kalamaran).
First, the caster must set up a contingency spell that activates an animate dead. Any of these spells can be obtained from scrolls or items. Immediately after the contingency ceremony, he must also cast a magic jar spell (using his own magical ability). If he does not use the magic jar spell, or unsuccessfully casts it, he arises as a normal undead skeleton (losing all memory, abilities, etc.) rather than gaining the reliqus template.
He must enter the receptacle and immediately return to his normal body at the instant of its death, typically accomplished at the hands of an undead or construct. This completes the special ceremony. For the caster to gain the reliqus template, he must have the black onyx gem (for the animate dead) and the receptacle (for the magic jar) on his person, as well as a pair of gemstones of one particular type. These gemstones must be either a pair of amythests (worth at least 50gp each), diamonds (100 gp each), emeralds (75 gp each) or sapphires (150 gp each).
Once he dies (any time within the duration of the contingency), he arises in 1d12 hours. Before he arises, over 50% of his flesh must be destroyed (eaten, burned, etc.). This destruction of the body is also typically left to an undead or construct. If the villain still has 50% of his flesh on his body, he gains the zombie template instead. Before he arises, the pair of gemstones must be placed in the character’s empty eye sockets, where they will magically graft themselves and be in no danger of falling out. If this is not done, the character will not have access to the gem’s special abilty (see below).
Typically, xenoa are created when a cleric of the Harvester of Souls fails to harvest enough souls before he dies - causing him to return as a lower undead such as a skeleton, zombie or (if he is lucky) a reliqus or xenoa. However, on occasion crazed spellcasters do intentionally perform a certain dark ritual intended to transform them into such a creature.
Becoming a xenoa (or “smart zombie,” when translated from Reanaarese to Merchant’s Tongue) works much like becoming a reliqus. First, the caster must set up a contingency spell that activates an animate dead. Either of these spells can be obtained from scrolls or items. Immediately after the contingency ceremony, he must also cast a magic jar spell (using his own magical ability). If he does not use the magic jar spell, or unsuccessfully casts it, he arises as a normal zombie (losing all memory, abilities, etc.) rather than gaining the xenoa (pronounced zee-know-uh) template.
He must enter the receptacle and immediately return to his normal body at the instant of its death, typically accomplished at the hands of an undead or construct. This completes the special ceremony. For the caster to gain the xenoa template, he must have the black onyx gem (for the animate dead) and the receptacle (for the magic jar) on his person.
Once he dies (any time within the duration of the contingency), he arises as a xenoa in 1d12 hours. If, for some reason, more than 50% of his flesh was destroyed (eaten, burned, etc.), before his arising, he gains the reliqus template (see above), though without the use of the special gem powers normally available to a reliqus.
Vostarr, Barrowman, Wight: Deliberately becoming a vostarr (a Fhokki word roughly translating as “barrow man,” or “wight” in Merchant’s Tongue) is similar to becoming an avildar. The subject must perform a ritual in an area sacred to the Harvester of Souls, within a greater magic circle against good. However, he does not need gaseous form or fly spells.
At the beginning, he need only switch into the receptacle and back once. Halfway through the ceremony, after reciting a long series of prayers to the King of the Undead (which are different than those necessary to gain any other undead template) he casts bull’s strength upon himself (this spell cannot be supplied by outside forces). He must cast permanency and enervation within a three round span. The remaining time is spent reciting further prayers. At the end of the ceremony, the creature sacrifices its own life to the Harvester of Souls.
The villain must succeed at a Will save (DC 12). If he succeeds, he rises the next night as a vostarr.
Prerequisites: bull’s strength, enervation, magic jar, permanency; GP Cost: 3,000; XP Cost: 750.
It is said that the first vostarr came from an arctic land far to the north, and soon spread its taint among the Fhokki tribes near Lake Jorakk, before the tribesmen banded together briefly to destroy all the undead menaces. Yet, rumors of vostarrs still echo throughout the countryside and more than one murder or disappearance has been attributed to this monster.
Xenoa, Smart Zombie: Typically, xenoa are created when a cleric of the Harvester of Souls fails to harvest enough souls before he dies - causing him to return as a lower undead such as a skeleton, zombie or (if he is lucky) a reliqus or xenoa. However, on occasion crazed spellcasters do intentionally perform a certain dark ritual intended to transform them into such a creature.
Becoming a xenoa (or “smart zombie,” when translated from Reanaarese to Merchant’s Tongue) works much like becoming a reliqus. First, the caster must set up a contingency spell that activates an animate dead. Either of these spells can be obtained from scrolls or items. Immediately after the contingency ceremony, he must also cast a magic jar spell (using his own magical ability). If he does not use the magic jar spell, or unsuccessfully casts it, he arises as a normal zombie (losing all memory, abilities, etc.) rather than gaining the xenoa (pronounced zee-know-uh) template.
He must enter the receptacle and immediately return to his normal body at the instant of its death, typically accomplished at the hands of an undead or construct. This completes the special ceremony. For the caster to gain the xenoa template, he must have the black onyx gem (for the animate dead) and the receptacle (for the magic jar) on his person.
Once he dies (any time within the duration of the contingency), he arises as a xenoa in 1d12 hours. If, for some reason, more than 50% of his flesh was destroyed (eaten, burned, etc.), before his arising, he gains the reliqus template (see above), though without the use of the special gem powers normally available to a reliqus.
Esmaran, Elven Vampire Necromancer 13: ?
Puramal, Human Ghost Fighter 4: A fallen bridge in the city of Pipido is the anchor for the ghost of Puramal, a soldier who died defending the bridge. The ghost is filled with anger at seeing his companions flee, leaving him to die. Puramal died as the bridge collapsed and does not know or does not care that there is nothing left to defend.
Puramal is a victim of circumstances whose unlife is devoted to defending the bridge that he could not protect in life. He will defend this area with every ounce of strength that he has, not caring whom he is defending it from.
Terrus Dyrn, Lich Sorcerer 18: The origin of Terrus Dyrn, the lich, is lost to the sands of time. Rumors say that Dyrn was an evil sorcerer who traveled with a group of adventurers, now dead these many centuries. Of course, no one has talked to Dyrn to confirm this.

Undead: As another interesting plot twist, the PCs could storm the laboratory of a necromancer just in time to disrupt a crucial part of an experiment. Perhaps this creates a powerful or previously unknown variant of undead.
Over the centuries, many tragic tales arise of people swallowed up or seduced by dark forces. Not truly alive, not quite dead, these walking corpses roam the land for their own purposes, haunting and horrifying those who remain among the living (especially those whom they have left behind). In general, those who become undead do not do so of their own free will. They are merely corpses reanimated through dark and sinister magic, doing their master’s bidding without fear or hesitation. However, some villains seek to gain an undead template (such as a lich) so that they can pursue their mad goals throughout eternity.
On Tellene, it is common knowledge (among the well educated) that the Congregation of the Dead treats undeath as a reward, not a curse. What is not generally known is that the number and strength of the souls that a cleric takes directly reflects on his future undead status. Dying while attempting to take a soul is said to grant automatic undeath. Those outside the Congregation of the Dead must find another path, but regardless of the technique, all that seek this dark knowledge must pay homage to the King of the Undead.
Once a villain makes this choice, he may seek one of many paths. One of the most straightforward is to use a miracle or wish spell. For reasons known only the Lord of the Underworld himself, the miracle or wish spell does not allow one to become a lich or a vampire, though it does allow one to become a “lower” form of undead, such as a zombie. Whether the caster is the recipient or not, the recipient must be willing to undergo the transformation. Additionally, the caster must spend the spell’s XP cost and material components worth no less than 10,000 gp. This can be a gem-studded piece of artwork honoring the Harvester of Souls, and it is destroyed in the casting.
As the final step, the caster must kill the recipient of the spell (if this is the caster himself, he must commit suicide). The newly formed undead creature retains his original class abilities, adding the appropriate undead template (see below). Note that if the recipient is not the caster, any time the caster gives the new undead a command, it must make a Will save as if the caster had used control undead to obey. Furthermore, the recipient suffers a –8 circumstance penalty to any save against an actual control undead spell or any other relevant magic that controls undead. If the caster tries to turn, command or rebuke the undead he created, treat the undead as if it had half its number of Hit Dice. (These limitations apply only when the creator of the undead uses these abilities. Other clerics and spells affect the undead normally.)
Those without access to such overwhelming magical forces can choose to unlock the secrets of certain rituals to become a specific type of undead. Villains trying to obtain the necessary components for these processes must be very secretive. Heroes and even other villains usually want to prevent them from gaining any of the undead templates, and some of the combinations of components for these processes are quite recognizable.
Unless otherwise specified, discovering the process of becoming a free-willed undead requires a Knowledge (arcana) or Knowledge (undead) skill check against DC 25.
Ghost: Ghostmaker magic weapon.
Lich: Perhaps the evil wizard discovered an ancient ritual that transformed him into a lich.
The template system makes it easy to quickly create these special types and understand how they work, but there is little detail about the villain’s actual preparations to become such a creature. After all, the villain doesn’t just go down to his laboratory, drink a magic potion and instantly become a lich. It takes time, hard work and the use of unnatural magical powers.
Once a villain makes this choice, he may seek one of many paths. One of the most straightforward is to use a miracle or wish spell. For reasons known only the Lord of the Underworld himself, the miracle or wish spell does not allow one to become a lich or a vampire, though it does allow one to become a “lower” form of undead, such as a zombie.
Becoming a Lich
To become a lich, the base creature must prepare his phylactery himself. This requires he begin with an object worth 120,000 gp. While he need not construct the entire object, he must participate in the creation, assisting the craftsman. Most often, the phylactery takes the form of a sealed metal box with strips of parchment holding magically transcribed phrases. At least one of these phrases must be a special, rare prayer to the Harvester of Souls. (Evil non-followers of the Bringer of the Grave have been known to kill for these prayers. Without this special prayer to Tellene’s god of the undead, the ritual is ineffective.) The box is typically attached to a leather strap to be worn on the forehead or arm. Whatever form the object takes, every aspect must be of the finest materials and workmanship. (The box phylactery is Tiny and has a Hardness of 20, along with 40 hit points and a Break DC 40.) The phylactery can also take the form of a ring, amulet or other object.
Once the object is prepared, the potential lich applies his Craft Wondrous Item feat. It takes at least 12 days to complete the complex process of enchanting the phylactery, and uses all of the sorcerer or wizard’s spell slots from magic jar, permanency and possibly limited wish for that entire time. (Though clerics can become a lich through this process, the majority of those who attempt it are wizards or sorcerers.)
The preparer may use outside help for reincarnation or raise dead (instead of limited wish). Usually this involves using a ring of spell storing. Another caster charges the desired spell into the ring and the creator of the phylactery then need only use it once, but thereafter that spell can never be placed in that ring of spell storing again. (Any attempt uses the spell slot, but has no effect.)
THE FINAL STEP TO LICHDOM
Additionally, the caster must have a certain potion for the final ceremony. Most casters refuse to leave the creation of such a potion to anyone else, but the imbiber need not be the one who brews it. The potion can be prepared up to one year before the final ceremony. It must be a lethal concoction, and all the following spells must then be cast upon it: permanency, chill touch, fear, hold monster, protection from energy (cold) and animate dead.
The final rite is performed at midnight after the phylactery is complete. The base creature must find a secluded area (often an area cursed by the Harvester of Souls or one of his temples) and, with the phylactery within range of the magic jar, complete the process. This involves drinking the potion. The imbiber must make a Will save (DC 16). If he fails, he is permanently dead. If he succeeds (and the phylactery is not destroyed in the intervening time), he rises as a lich in 1d10 days.
A few scholars have suggested that adding certain other spells to the concoction can grant the imbiber a bonus (and presumably also penalties) to his Will save. No villains volunteered for experimentation regarding this possibility (i.e. it is up to the DM).
Prerequisites: Minimum 11th level sorcerer, wizard or cleric; Craft Wondrous Item feat; magic jar, permanency, reincarnate or raise dead or limited wish; GP Cost: 120,000 (phylactery, caster level = caster’s current level in the appropriate class); XP Cost: 4,800 XP.
Vampire: Once a villain makes this choice, he may seek one of many paths. One of the most straightforward is to use a miracle or wish spell. For reasons known only the Lord of the Underworld himself, the miracle or wish spell does not allow one to become a lich or a vampire, though it does allow one to become a “lower” form of undead, such as a zombie.
Deliberately becoming a vampire can be as simple as inviting one to drain your life energy. Of course, few villains volunteer for such treatment as it leaves them under the control of the vampiric “parent.” Those seeking to become a first generation vampire tread a dangerous path, but such is the risk for a dedicated villain.
One method of becoming a first-generation vampire is for the villain to sell his soul to Zazimash, Lord of the Underworld (also known as the Harvester of Souls). Assuming that the deity does not simply destroy the villain on a whim, Zazimash may very well grant the villain’s desire. The second, and safer, way to become a first-generation vampire is by means of an ancient Svimohzish ritual. This ritual can be discovered through roleplaying or by succeeding at a Knowledge (arcane) check (DC 25).
The ritual requires a special potion for use in the actual ceremony. Creating this potion requires the Brew Potion and Craft Wondrous Item feats. This potion requires three base components. First, at least one quart of blood from a magical creature (dragon, magical beast, outsider or shapechanger, but NOT any creature with the Fire subtype). The blood must also come from a creature whose Hit Dice at least equal that of the creature seeking to become a vampire. Second, the potion requires dust from the ashes of a burned vampire the villain had a hand in slaying. Third, the villain must spend 4,200 XP. Finally, the brewer must collect other rare and exotic ingredients
for the potion (typical lists include bat’s eyes, wolf ’s heart, rat brains, tears of a good cleric, a holy symbol dipped in human blood and a pound of dried mosquito or tick husks). The total value of these items if purchased (though that is rarely possible) is at least 16,000 gp.
The caster level of the potion must be equal to or greater than that of the potential new vampire. Once the potion has been successfully brewed, the new base creature must stand within a greater magic circle against good and sacrifice a living creature, mixing its blood with the potion. It then drinks the entire potion from a human skull, and finishes off the sacrifice by drinking as much of the remainder of the sacrificed creature’s blood as it can stand. This part of the ceremony must be completed in less than ten minutes and in an area no better lit than the equivalent of a fading twilight. During the entire ceremony, when not actually drinking, the creature must recite prayers to the Lord of the Underworld. Theories suggest that the more prayers he knows, the better his chances of success are (the DM may declare a +1 to the save for every two prayers the character knows beyond the tenth).
Finally, the creature must kill himself while standing in a coffin full of grave dirt, into which he falls after death. The preferred method is slashing the throat with a magical or ceremonial dagger.
After all this, the base creature makes a single Will saving 0throw (DC 18). If he succeeds, he dies and becomes a free-willed vampire. If he fails, he simply dies (and is permanently deceased). If the potential base creature is NOT the brewer of the potion and his Will save comes up 1, he does become a vampire, but he is under the total control of the brewer of the potion.
The new vampire rises from his coffin at nightfall 1d6 nights after the completion of the ceremony.
Prerequisites: Brew Potion, Craft Wondrous Item feats; blood sacrifices; GP Cost: 16,000 gp (blood from a magical creature, dust from a vampire, one pound of mosquito/tick husks); XP Cost: 4,200.
Allip: ?
Zombie: Once a villain makes this choice, he may seek one of many paths. One of the most straightforward is to use a miracle or wish spell. For reasons known only the Lord of the Underworld himself, the miracle or wish spell does not allow one to become a lich or a vampire, though it does allow one to become a “lower” form of undead, such as a zombie.
Deep with an underground maze somewhere in the Principality of Pekal, or so the legend goes, lies a sleeping lich queen and a mysterious black tome of immense power. Modern sages speculate that this queen somehow learned of (or created) a magical ritual that allows a willing spellcaster to transform himself into a reliqus (a powerful self-willed type of skeleton, also known as a “galanam” in Kalamaran).
First, the caster must set up a contingency spell that activates an animate dead. Any of these spells can be obtained from scrolls or items. Immediately after the contingency ceremony, he must also cast a magic jar spell (using his own magical ability). If he does not use the magic jar spell, or unsuccessfully casts it, he arises as a normal undead skeleton (losing all memory, abilities, etc.) rather than gaining the reliqus template.
He must enter the receptacle and immediately return to his normal body at the instant of its death, typically accomplished at the hands of an undead or construct. This completes the special ceremony. For the caster to gain the reliqus template, he must have the black onyx gem (for the animate dead) and the receptacle (for the magic jar) on his person, as well as a pair of gemstones of one particular type. These gemstones must be either a pair of amythests (worth at least 50gp each), diamonds (100 gp each), emeralds (75 gp each) or sapphires (150 gp each).
Once he dies (any time within the duration of the contingency), he arises in 1d12 hours. Before he arises, over 50% of his flesh must be destroyed (eaten, burned, etc.). This destruction of the body is also typically left to an undead or construct. If the villain still has 50% of his flesh on his body, he gains the zombie template instead.
Typically, xenoa are created when a cleric of the Harvester of Souls fails to harvest enough souls before he dies - causing him to return as a lower undead such as a skeleton, zombie or (if he is lucky) a reliqus or xenoa. However, on occasion crazed spellcasters do intentionally perform a certain dark ritual intended to transform them into such a creature.
Becoming a xenoa (or “smart zombie,” when translated from Reanaarese to Merchant’s Tongue) works much like becoming a reliqus. First, the caster must set up a contingency spell that activates an animate dead. Either of these spells can be obtained from scrolls or items. Immediately after the contingency ceremony, he must also cast a magic jar spell (using his own magical ability). If he does not use the magic jar spell, or unsuccessfully casts it, he arises as a normal zombie (losing all memory, abilities, etc.) rather than gaining the xenoa (pronounced zee-know-uh) template.
Skeleton: Deep with an underground maze somewhere in the Principality of Pekal, or so the legend goes, lies a sleeping lich queen and a mysterious black tome of immense power. Modern sages speculate that this queen somehow learned of (or created) a magical ritual that allows a willing spellcaster to transform himself into a reliqus (a powerful self-willed type of skeleton, also known as a “galanam” in Kalamaran).
First, the caster must set up a contingency spell that activates an animate dead. Any of these spells can be obtained from scrolls or items. Immediately after the contingency ceremony, he must also cast a magic jar spell (using his own magical ability). If he does not use the magic jar spell, or unsuccessfully casts it, he arises as a normal undead skeleton (losing all memory, abilities, etc.) rather than gaining the reliqus template.
Typically, xenoa are created when a cleric of the Harvester of Souls fails to harvest enough souls before he dies - causing him to return as a lower undead such as a skeleton, zombie or (if he is lucky) a reliqus or xenoa.
Wraith: Any humanoid or monstrous humanoid slain by an avildar becomes a wraith in 1d4 rounds.
Ghoul: Humanoids killed by a guraah (and not eaten) rise as normal ghouls in 1d12 hours. Casting protection from evil on a body before that time will avert the transformation.
Wight, Undead Thrall: Any humanoid or monstrous humanoid slain by a vostarr becomes an undead thrall in 1d4 rounds. Spawn are under the command of the vostarr that created them and remain enslaved until its death. These spawn are normal wights as described in the Monster Manual and as such retain none of the abilities they had in life.
Ghast: ?
Shadow: Shadow Touch spell.
Vampire Spawn: A character that dies whilst wearing the suit of vampiric armor has a 35% chance of returning as a vampire spawn within 1d3 days; this is 100% if the death is caused by the armor’s blood drain ability.
Vampiric Armor magic armor.

SHADOW TOUCH
Necromancy [Evil]
Level: Clr 3, Sor/Spl/Wiz 3
Components: V, S
Casting Time: 1 standard action
Range: Personal
Duration: 3 rounds + 1 round per level
Saving Throw: Fortitude negates
Spell Resistance: Yes
When the caster completes this spell, his or her hand turns black as pitch. Touched creatures must make a saving throw or suffer 1d4+1 hit points of damage and 1 point of temporary Strength damage. If an opponent is reduced to 0 Strength in such a manner, he or she becomes a shadow (see the Monster Manual). Otherwise, lost Strength points return at the rate of 1 point per day. A creature brought below 0 hit points by the damage is dying, but will not become a shadow. Note that the caster must also make a Fortitude saving throw or he begins to suffer the effects of lost Strength at a rate of 1 point per round. He must engulf his shadow hand in flames (taking 1d4 points of damage) in order to remove the dweomer before the spell duration expires if he wishes to avoid further Strength loss.

Ghostmaker: This fiendish heavy mace, crafted from black iron, has a head worked to resemble a human face shrieking in agony. This heavy mace is a +3 enchanted weapon, and is favoured by clerics of the Rotlord who have the ability to compel service from powerful undead. Any creature killed by this weapon arises as a ghost, and immediately seeks out the mace’s bearer. If he is capable of rebuking and commanding undead, the mace’s owner may use a turning attempt to seize control of the ghost. Otherwise, the ghost attacks the bearer. If the ghost destroys the bearer, it leaves to stalk the living and spread destruction in its wake.
Strong Necromancy; Caster Level: 15th; Prerequisites: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, command, create greater undead; Market Price: 30,312 gp.

Vampiric Armor: Commonly found only in half- and fullplate varieties, vampiric armor is both bane and boon to its wearer. To most wearers, the armor looks like a fairly typical suit of shrike armor (see the KINGDOMS OF KALAMAR Player’s Guide).
However, with magical aid such as detect magic, the suit shows strong enchantment and necromantic auras.
On the positive side, the armor is +1 magical armor (or better), allows the wearer to turn into gaseous form three times per week, and has the added special ability of Invulnerability (see Dungeon Master’s Guide page 219). On the negative side, the external spikes are actually a form of drinking tube for the armor, which needs the blood of sentient beings in order to survive. Each day the armor is worn, it requires a number of hit points (of blood) equal to twice its AC bonus. The armor must take the blood from live foes through the spikes. Only damage caused by the actual spikes counts towards this total. One of the ways to achieve this is to grapple opponents on the spikes (see Armor Spikes on page 124 of the Player’s Handbook). If no blood is forthcoming by the end of the day, the suit automatically drains it from its wearer, growing spikes inwards into his or her flesh.
Even when not worn, the armor still craves blood and loses one from its AC bonus and a number of uses of gaseous form per week it is not fed. Feeding the unworn armor one hit point of blood per day halts this slow degradation. Each day missed, even if not concurrent, should be counted (the villain cannot feed the armor only once per week and still stave off the power loss!). When the armor reaches a zero AC bonus it has effectively “died,” and requires 20 hit points worth of blood per +1 AC and use of gaseous form that the wearer wants “re-charged.” The Invulnerability bonus only functions when the armor is fully fed.
A character that dies whilst wearing the suit of vampiric armor has a 35% chance of returning as a vampire spawn within 1d3 days; this is 100% if the death is caused by the armor’s blood drain ability.
Strong Necromancy; Caster Level: 18th; Prerequisites: Craft Magic Arms and Armor, bestow curse, gaseous form, slow death, stoneskin, wish or miracle. Market Price: 124,750 gp; Weight: 45 lb.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Loot Harder: A Book of Treasures
13th Age
Undead: Deathless Champion power of the Heart of Death artifact.
Peer of the Realm of Death Epic power of the Heart of Death artifact.
Undead Elf: ?
Ghost of Moth: ?
Paladin's Ghost: ?
Ghost: Somebody once died while riding on a friend’s shoulders, and their ghost haunts the saddleback pauldrons. The phantom seeks to complete unfinished business, and that means joining up with the Crusader’s forces on a foolhardy mission.
Skeletal Doorman: ?
Vampire, Count Hans d'Orlac: ?

Lich King: ?
Lich: ?
Vampire: ?
Wight: ?
Zombie: ?

THE HEART OF DEATH
A black pendant made from an organ taken from a corpse, what could go wrong?
Artifact description: This black wrinkled leathery lump is the mummified remains of somebody’s heart.
History: The heart wants to end the world (what were you expecting?). It has been tied to disasters, plagues, the unleashing of monsters, and acts of magic that have threatened reality itself. Every time an age comes to a catastrophic end, the heart always seems to be at least tangentially involved. Legend says that it was the Lich King’s, but how can that be true?
Icon relationships: Lich King (positive), Emperor (negative), Orc Lord (negative), the Three (negative).
Adventurer
Fearless: You are immune to the fear condition. Quirk: Not disgusted by dead things.
Undying: (quick action – recharge 6+ after use): Gain temporary hit points equal to the level of the highest-level undead in the battle (the last mook of a mob doesn’t count; double strength or large counts as double its level; huge, triple-strength, or stronger counts as triple its level). Quirk: Aware of the fragility of life, and the strength of the undead.
Champion
Deathless: The next time you die (only), immediately regain full hit points, and your creature type become undead. Quirk: ‘Dead’ and ‘alive’ are just labels, ones that no longer concern you.
Life-drinker (1/day): When a nearby creature (including you) takes negative energy damage, heal using a free recovery.
Quirk: Helps others understand that death can sometimes be welcome.
Epic
Peer of the Realm of Death (1/level): When an ally dies, activate this power. During your next rest, permanently reduce your maximum recoveries by 1 to return that ally to “life,” if they are willing. Their creature type becomes undead and they gain vulnerability: holy. They must also change one of their icon relationships to be with the Lich King, if one wasn’t already.
Quirk: Keeps their friends close.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
The Book of Ages
13th Age
Undead: The Necromancers of the Fangs, that famous cabal of wizards who raised vast armies of the dead.
They were loyal beyond death to the Tyrant Lizard, reincarnating alongside her when they fell in battle. When she vanished, so did they. A few might survive as bodyguards sworn to the Black Dragon. Equally, the Lich King could raise some as undead, or the Diabolist draw some of their souls back from the dead.
Necroblast Sorcerer or Wizard talent.
Lich King: If, in fact, the Wizard King that slew the White went ahead and reanimated its corpse as a dragon-lich, shouldn’t that have been a clue to the transformation that was to come, Wizard King into Lich King?
Now, the tales differ on certain specifics. For example, it’s not known why the Lich King rose in this age after spending so many centuries safely dead. Some tales sympathetic to the old master insist that the Empire was under the control of a cruel and brutish Emperor, a man so vile that the peasants prayed for the Wizard King to return and retake his domain. The sages in Horizon speculate that this was the culmination of some long-planned ritual or contingency, and that it look the Lich King many ages to gather the necromantic power he needed to become a demilich. In certain secret councils of the wise, they fear that the disappearance of the Hooded Woman must be connected to the rise of the Lich King.
Others, reasonably, blame tomb-robbing adventurers for awakening an ancient evil.
Dragon-Lich, The White: If, in fact, the Wizard King that slew the White went ahead and reanimated its corpse as a dragon-lich, shouldn’t that have been a clue to the transformation that was to come, Wizard King into Lich King?
Evil Overlord Undead Horror: ?
Undead Dragon-Golem Justicar: Using magic taken from the Necromancers of the Fangs.
Primordial Giant Skeleton: Ages later, the Lich King, out of some perverse whimsical revenge, created titanic horrors from the long-buried corpses of the giants who sacked Axis in the First Age. The necromantic spells that animate them take years to seep through the soil, so it’s not uncommon for giant skeletons to suddenly rise from their First Age barrows and stumble off in the direction of Axis.
Snapping Skull: Primordial Giant Skeleton's Skull Bowling power.
Undead Giant: ?
Underhome Shade: Many dwarves perished in the destruction of Underhome. Some were taken unawares by the poisonous gases, but others lingered too long, trying to gather up their treasure before fleeing. They linger still.
Ichor Vampire: Ichor vampires once fed on the blood or congealed ichor of a divine entity—a terrible mistake. The vampires are unable to wholly digest the divine essence, nor can they ever be satisfied with weak, thin mortal blood.
Feral Vampire: ?
Breathstealer Cat: ?
Breathstealer Thrall: If a humanoid creature dies near the breathstealer cat, it returns next round as a breathstealer thrall.
Breathstealer cats are spies and saboteurs sent by the Lich King. They sneak into hospitals and the homes of the dying, so they can steal the last breath from a victim. Consuming the last breath allows the cat to animate the deceased as an undead thrall, though a cat can only have one or two thralls at a time.
Blackamber Skeletal Captain: ?
Blackamber Skeletal Champion: ?
Blackamber Skeleton: ?
Bone Dervish: ?
Dervish Puppet: Bone Dervish's Raise Minion power.
Necromage: Only the Lich King would create undead capable of drawing on the powers of the dead to crowdsource their spell casting. Absolutely. No other icon would ever experiment with such things. And no other icon would ever, ever be the effective ruler of a highly populous Imperial city with lots of graveyards. Nope.
Ratbone Twist: Ratfolk Bone Shaman Bone-Curse power.
Hog-Ghoul: Not all ghouls descend from human stock. The Ghoul King’s scavenger host bred these ghastly, carnivorous boars who snuffled out buried corpses in graveyards like truffles in a forest.
Ghoul Giant: ?
Rootwight: ?
Undead Corsair: These stats reflect the few remaining living corsairs of the south coast. If you want to turn them into undead corsairs, then either murder them and raise them with dreadful necromantic incantations, or:
• Add vulnerability: holy
• Replace cowardly with: won’t stay dead: If at the start of the Corsair Crewman’s turn, there are more enemies on the battlefield than allies, the corsair crewman gains another use of more of ye!
Undead Corsair Marine: ?
Zombie Pirate Captain: Many corsairs perished in the deep waters, but later returned as undead horrors. In the Midland Sea, such undead revenants are in the service of the Lich King, while those who died in the Iron Sea and weren’t eaten by sea monsters are free-willed independent undead without a liege.
The Alchemist, Lich: Other tales say that the Alchemist was resurrected as a lich, and is now a vassal of the Lich King.
Mind-Eater Wraith: Mind-Eater Wraiths made from broken rings.

Ghoul: ?
Blackamber Legionnaire: ?
Vampire: Necromages are adept at drawing on the dead to fuel their rituals. A necromage with access to a great many corpses can cast epic-level rituals on its own (like, say, opening teleportation gates to the Necropolis, creating champion-tier zombie plagues, or raising a vampire or three).
Zombie: Necromages are adept at drawing on the dead to fuel their rituals. A necromage with access to a great many corpses can cast epic-level rituals on its own (like, say, opening teleportation gates to the Necropolis, creating champion-tier zombie plagues, or raising a vampire or three).
Lich: Wealthy lords would hire the best alchemists and necromancers to turn them into liches.
Headless Zombie: ?
Skull of the Beast: ?
The Gold King: The wars between elf and dwarf that began the age were soon eclipsed by other perils. The sheer slaughter birthed a terrible lord of the undead.
The Gold King was a corrupt dwarf who, by some accounts, refused the command of the Dwarf King to leave Underhome. Some tales claim that the Gold King died of poison and rose again as an undead monster; other stories insist that the Gold King deliberately transformed himself into an undead horror to survive in the poisoned reaches. Some even say that the Gold King was actually the true Dwarf King, and that the King who ordered the dwarves to abandon Underhome was a facsimile conjured by the treacherous illusions of the dark elves.
Great Ghoul, Ghoul King: The Great Ghoul was presented in Lions & Tigers & Owlbears: 13th Age Bestiary 2 as a fallen icon. Perhaps one of the Great Ghoul’s secrets is that it was a god before it was an icon? When the other gods retreated, the Great Ghoul remained to decay as part of the mortal world.

Necroblast
Once per day, before you cast a spell, you may declare it to be a necroblast. The spell’s damage type becomes negative energy damage in addition to its usual type. If any non-undead nonmooks are destroyed by the spell, they become undead under your control.
In battle, these undead creatures crumble at the end of their next turn, or if they are hit by any other attack, but may make a move and a basic attack under your control. The creatures are considered weakened (–4 to attacks and defenses).
Alternatively, if you do not wish to force the creatures to fight for you, the undead creature will perform one brief service for you after the battle before crumbling, like answering a question, guiding you a short distance, carrying you across some obstacle, or a brief improvised entertainment.
If no creatures are destroyed by the necroblast, you gain no added benefit.
Adventurer Feat: If you don’t kill any non-mooks with the spell, your necroblast ability isn’t expended.
Champion Feat: Reanimated creatures aren’t weakened.
Epic Feat: The service you demand out of battle doesn’t have to be a brief one. Instead, they serve you at least until your next full heal-up, and possibly longer. Creatures who are forced to serve still won’t fight for you.

R: Skull Bowling +13 vs PD (1d3+1 nearby or far away enemies)—The giant removes its skull, creating a Snapping Skull and rolls it over an unpredictable set of foes. Any foes hit with this attack take 50 damage. The Snapping Skull ends up engaged with one of the foes targeted with skull bowling.
Natural 16+: The snapping skull may make a free skull snap attack on this enemy as it passes, or as it ends the attack engaged with the enemy.
Limited use: 1/battle.
Where’s my head: If a snapping skull is nearby (even if it originally belonged to a different giant!), the Primordial Giant Skeleton may pick it up instead of attacking, giving it another use of skull bowling.
Separate elements: The primordial giant skeleton doesn’t lose any hit points or abilities by detaching its skull from its body, but you’ll track damage dealt to the snapping skull as a separate creature throughout the battle, and if the snapping skull is destroyed while separated from the body, the primordial giant skeleton is weakened (–4 to all attacks and defenses) unless it’s temporarily wearing a different giant’s skull!

C: Raise minion +12 vs. PD (1d4 nearby enemies who are not engaged by a dervish puppet)—10 damage, and add a dervish puppet to the battlefield that’s engaged with that target. (The dervish puppets all act immediately after the bone dervish.)

R: Bone-curse +9 vs. MD (1d4 nearby or far-away enemies)—5 damage, and each foe is engaged with a ratbone twist, a swirling swarm of dead rats bones and filth. While engaged by a ratbone twist, the target is considered vulnerable to the attacks of ratfolk. The ratbone twist can be targeted as a nonmook undead enemy, and destroyed by any attack (assume it’s got an AC, PD and MD of 5 and 5 hit points). Ratbone twists are also destroyed if an enemy successfully pops free from them (they stay engaged on a failed attempt to disengage, and move with their foe.)
If the target is already engaged by a ratbone twist when targeted by this attack, then the target takes 2d6 damage for every existing ratbone twist engaging them.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
The Book of Demons
13th Age
Undead Celestial: The last of the hellhole’s flying realms was shattered by a test firing of Azgarrak’s death ray. Now, it’s a burning ring of smaller flying rocks, where the scorched undead remains of celestials battle with both their surviving former compatriots, and the demonic hordes from the Fortress of the Balor who press on towards the edge of the overworld.
Undead: Bar-en-Huil is long buried, so no-one knows if it’s a city or a town or some other structure. It’s a ruin, many Ages old, that covers the lower western slopes of Claw Peak. The bizarre landslides caused by the hellhole sometimes lift away the rubble that entombs the ruined city, making it possible to explore the ruins of Bar-en-Huil for brief periods until the rocks fall on it again. Undead—perhaps awoken by the proximity of the hellhole—drift through the streets, mourning their lost city.
Flesh-carver demons hang around with a variety of low-lives, including greater claw demons, despoiler mages who help trick creatures into signing consent forms, and undead like zombies that didn’t quite survive the surgical process.
Lich Lord: ?
Lich: Those previous Diabolists in their tombs in the Cairnwood? Ever hear of better candidates for retroactive lichdom?
Ghoul: ?
Vampire: ?
Zombie: Flesh-carver demons hang around with a variety of low-lives, including greater claw demons, despoiler mages who help trick creatures into signing consent forms, and undead like zombies that didn’t quite survive the surgical process.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Spellchrome Core Rulebook
Spellchrome
Undead: ?
Lumbering Dead: When barrier spirits cross over into Eldlandria, some are not strong enough to feed off or control a living creature. The barrier spirit is forced to inhabit and use a human corpse, creating what is commonly called the lumbering dead.
Stories persist of humans working in coordination with spirit forces to cobble together even more powerful lumbering dead from the components of several corpses.
In order for a victim to become a lumbering dead, they have to die first (even then, it’s rare).
Zombie: ?
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Monsters & Creatures: A Young Adventurer's Guide
5e
Vampire Lord: ?
Undead: The dead do not always rest peacefully.
Banshee: The corrupted spirit of a female elf. These cursed creatures misused their great beauty in life and are now condemned to suffer for their cruelty in death.
Skeleton: Animated by dark magic, skeletons are bony warriors summoned forth by spellcasters or who arise of their own accord from graves steeped in necromantic energy and ancient evils.
While most skeletons are humanoid, bones of all types can be brought back to life with powerful enough magic, and adventurers may find themselves facing down all manner of strange and deadly skeletal forms!
While standard races such as humans and elves are most common, powerful mages have managed to revive the bones of huge creatures, like dragons and giants—not to mention cobbling together unique creations from a mix of different bones!
Vampire: ?
Vampire Spawn: Vampire spawn are created when a vampire feeds on a living creature and allows its victim to expire without tasting the vampire’s blood in return.
Legendary Vampire, Count Strahd von Zarovich: ?
Ghost: ?
Ghoul: ?
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Mordenkainen's Tome of Foes
5e
Allip: When a mind uncovers a secret that a powerful being has protected with a mighty curse, the result is often the emergence of an allip. Secrets protected in this manner range in scope from a demon lord's true name to the hidden truths of the cosmic order. The allip acquires the secret, but the curse annihilates its body and leaves behind a spectral creature composed of fragments from the victim's psyche and overwhelming psychic agony.
A few sages and spellcasters have sought to learn the truth about Gith's fate using arcane magic, only to fall victim to a bizarre curse that transforms them into the formless creatures known as allips.
Boneclaw: A wizard who tries to become a lich but fails might become a boneclaw instead.
The most important part of the transformation ritual occurs when the soul of the aspiring lich migrates to a prepared phylactery. If the spellcaster is too physically or magically weak to compel the soul into its prison, the soul instead seeks out a new master-a humanoid within a few miles who has an unusually hate-filled heart. The soul bonds itself to the foul essence it finds in that person, and the boneclaw becomes forever enslaved to its new master's wishes and subconscious whims. It forms near its master, sometimes appearing before that individual to receive orders and other times simply setting about the fulfillment of its master's desires.
Deathlock: The forging of a pact between a warlock and a patron is no minor occasion-at least not for the warlock. The consequences of breaking that pact can b e dire and, in some cases, lethal. A warlock who fails to live up to a bargain with an evil patron runs the risk of rising from the dead as a deathlock, a foul undead driven to serve its otherworldly patron from beyond the grave.
An extraordinarily powerful necromancer might also discover the dark methods of creating a deathlock and then bind it to service, acting in this respect as the deathlock's patron.
Deathlock Mastermind: ?
Deathlock Wight: Bereft of much of its magic, a deathlock wight lingers between the warlock it was and the deathly existence of a wight- a special punishment meted out by certain patrons and necromancers.
Skeletal Arms: Orcus lair action.
Eidolon: The gods have many methods for protecting sites they deem holy. One servant they rely on often to do so is the eidolon, a ghostly spirit bound by a sacred oath to safeguard a place of import to the divine. Forged from the souls of those who had prove n their unwavering devotion, eidolons stalk temples and vaults, places where miracles have been witnessed and relics enshrined, to ensure that no enemy can gain a foothold against the gods' cause through defilement or violence within these sites.
Creating an eidolon requires a spirit of fanatical devotion-that of an individual who, in life, served with unwavering faithfulness. Upon death, a god might reward such a follower with everlasting service in the protection of a holy site.
Nightwalker: The Negative Plane is a place of darkness and death, anathema to all living things. Yet there are those who would tap into its fell power. to use its energy for sinister ends. Most often, when such individuals approach the midnight realm, they find they are unequal to the task. Those not destroyed outright are sometimes drawn inside the plane and replaced by nightwalkers, terrifying undead creatures that devour all life they encounter.
Stepping into the Negative Plane is tantamount to suicide, since the plane sucks the life and soul from such audacious creatures and annihilates them at once. Those few who survive the effort do so by sheer luck or by harnessing some rare form of magic that protects them against the hostile atmosphere. They soon discover, however, that they can't leave as easily as they arrived. For each creature that enters the plane, a nightwalker is released to take its place.
Skull Lord: A combined being born from three hateful individuals.
Infighting and treachery brought the skull lords into existence. The first of them appeared in the aftermath of Vecna's bid to conquer the world of Greyhawk, after the vampire Kas betrayed Vecna and took his eye and hand. In the confusion resulting from this turn of events, Vecna's warlords turned against each other, and the dark one's plans were dashed. In a rage, Vecna gathered up his generals and captains and bound them in groups of three, fusing them into undead abominations cursed to fight among themselves for all time. Since the first skull lords were exiled into shadow, others have joined them, typically after being created from other leaders who betrayed their masters.
Sword Wraith: When a glory-obsessed warrior dies in battle without earning the honor it desperately sought, its valor-hungry spirit might haunt the battlefield as a sword wraith.
Sword Wraith Commander: ?
Sword Wraith Warrior: ?
Vampiric Mist, Crimson Mist: In billowing clouds of fog lurk vampiric mists, the wretched remnants of vampires that were prevented from finding rest.
Vampiric mists, sometimes called crimson mists, are all that remain of vampires who couldn't return to their burial places after being defeated or suffering some mishap. Denied the restorative power of these places, the vampires' bodies dissolve into mist. The transformation strips the intelligence and personality from them until only an unholy, insatiable thirst for blood remains.

Undead: Dybbuk's Possess Corpse power.
Banshee: Some of her most fervent followers seek out the secret of attaining undeath for themselves. Kiaransalee favors them by bringing them back as undead, but unlike other gods of similar sort, Kiaransalee doesn't offer the undeath of lichdom but a lowly existence as a banshee, a revenant, or a wight.
Ghoul: In most cases, Orcus transforms his followers into undead creatures such as ghouls and wights.
Maurezhi are contagion incarnate. Their bite attacks can drain a victim's sense of self. If this affliction is allowed to go far enough, the victim is infected with an unholy hunger for flesh that overpowers their personality and transforms them into a ghoul.
Orcus rewards those who spread death in his name by granting them a small portion of his power. The least of these become ghouls and zombies who serve in his legions, while his favored servants are the cultists and necromancers who murder the living and then manipulate the dead, emulating their dread master.
Orcus causes up to six corpses within the lair to rise as skeletons, zombies, or ghouls. These undead obey his telepathic commands, which can reach anywhere in the lair.
Maurezhi Bite attack.
Nabassu Stoul Stealing Gaze attack.
Doresain: ?
Ghast: ?
Vlaakith, Lich-Queen, Githyanki: ?
Vecna, Arch-Lich: ?
Kas, Vampire Lord: ?
Lich: The most important part of the transformation ritual occurs when the soul of the aspiring lich migrates to a prepared phylactery. If the spellcaster is too physically or magically weak to compel the soul into its prison, the soul instead seeks out a new master-a humanoid within a few miles who has an unusually hate-filled heart.
Revenant: Some of her most fervent followers seek out the secret of attaining undeath for themselves. Kiaransalee favors them by bringing them back as undead, but unlike other gods of similar sort, Kiaransalee doesn't offer the undeath of lichdom but a lowly existence as a banshee, a revenant, or a wight.
Skeleton: Orcus causes up to six corpses within the lair to rise as skeletons, zombies, or ghouls. These undead obey his telepathic commands, which can reach anywhere in the lair.
The region containing Orcus's lair is warped by Orcus's magic, creating one or more of the following effects: • Dead beasts periodically animate as undead mockeries of their former selves. Skeletal and zombie versions of local wildlife are commonly seen in the area.
Specter: Corpses that accumulate on the construct's shell aren't just grisly battle trophies. A cadaver collector can summon the spirits of these cadavers to join battle with its enemies and to paralyze more creatures for eventual impalement. Although these specters are individually weak, a cadaver collector can call up an almost endless supply of them, if given time.
Summon Specters power.
Wight: In most cases, Orcus transforms his followers into undead creatures such as ghouls and wights.
Some of her most fervent followers seek out the secret of attaining undeath for themselves. Kiaransalee favors them by bringing them back as undead, but unlike other gods of similar sort, Kiaransalee doesn't offer the undeath of lichdom but a lowly existence as a banshee, a revenant, or a wight.
Zombie: The corpse flower animates one dead humanoid in its body, turning it into a zombie. The zombie appears in an unoccupied space within 5 feet of the corpse flower and acts immediately after it in the initiative order. The zombie acts as an ally of the corpse flower but isn't under its control, and the flower's s tench clings to it.
A humanoid slain by a deatlock wight's life drain attack rises 24 hours later as a zombie under the wight's control, unless the humanoid is restored to life or its body is destroyed.
Orcus rewards those who spread death in his name by granting them as mall portion of his power. The least of these become ghouls and zombies who serve in his legions, while his favored servants are the cultists and necromancers who murder the living and then manipulate the dead, emulating their dread master.
Orcus causes up to six corpses within the lair to rise as skeletons, zombies, or ghouls. These undead obey his telepathic commands, which can reach anywhere in the lair.
The region containing Orcus's lair is warped by Orcus's magic, creating one or more of the following effects: • Dead beasts periodically animate as undead mockeries of their former selves. Skeletal and zombie versions of local wildlife are commonly seen in the area.

Possess Corpse (Recharge 6). The dybbuk disappears into an intact corpse it can see within 5 feet of it. The corpse must be Large or smaller and be that of a beast or a humanoid. The dybbuk is now effectively the possessed creature. Its type becomes undead, though it now looks alive, and it gains a number of temporary hit points equal to the corpse's hit point maximum in life.
While possessing the corpse, the dybbuk retains its hit points, alignment, Intelligence, Wisdom, Charisma, telepathy, and immunity to poison damage, exhaustion, and being charmed and frightened. It otherwise uses the possessed target's game statistics, gaining access to its knowledge and proficiencies but not its class features, if any.
The possession lasts until the temporary hit points are lost (at which point the body becomes a corpse once more) or the dybbuk ends its possession using a bonus action. When the possession ends, the dybbuk reappears in an unoccupied space within 5 feet of the corpse.

Summon Specters (Recharges after a Short or Long Rest). As a bonus action, the cadaver collector calls up the enslaved spirits of those it has slain; ld6 specters (without Sunlight Sensitivity) arise in unoccupied spaces within 15 feet of the cadaver collector. The specters act right after the cadaver collector on the same initiative count and fight until they're destroyed. They disappear when the cadaver collector is destroyed.

Maurezhi Bite. Melee Weapon Attack: +6 to hit, reach 5 ft., one target. Hit: 14 (2dl0 + 3) piercing damage. If the target is a humanoid, its Charisma score is reduced by ld4. This reduction lasts until the target finishes a short or long rest. The target dies if this reduces its Charisma to 0. It rises 24 hours later as a ghoul, unless it has been revived or its corpse has been destroyed.

Soul-Stealing Gaze. The nabassu targets one creature it can see within 30 feet of it. If the target can see the nabassu and isn't a construct or an undead, it must succeed on a DC 16 Charisma saving throw or reduce its hit point maximum by 13 (2d12) and give the nabassu an equal number of temporary hit points. This reduction lasts until the target finishes a short or long rest. The target dies if its hit point maximum is reduced to 0, and if the target is a humanoid, it immediately rises as a ghoul under the nabassu's control.
 
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Voadam

Adventurer
Volo's Guide to Monsters
5e
Bodak: A bodak is the undead remains of someone who revered Orcus.
A worshiper of Orcus can take ritual vows while carving the demon lord's symbol on its chest over the heart. Orcus's power flays body, mind, and soul, leaving behind a sentient husk that sucks in all life energy near it. Most bodaks come into being in this way, then unleashed to spread death in Orcus's name. Orcus created the first bodaks in the Abyss from seven devotees, called the Hierophants of Annihilation. These figures, as mighty as balors, have free will but serve the Prince of Undeath directly. Any one of these bodaks can turn a slain mortal into a bodak with its gaze.
Hierophants of Annihilation, Bodak: Orcus created the first bodaks in the Abyss from seven devotees, called the Hierophants of Annihilation. These figures, as mighty as balors, have free will but serve the Prince of Undeath directly.
Devourer: A lesser demon that proves itself to Orcus might be granted the privilege of becoming a devourer. The Prince of Undeath transforms such a demon into an 8-foot-tall, desiccated humanoid with a hollowed-out ribcage, then fills the new creature with a hunger for souls. Orcus grants each new devourer the essence of a less fortunate demon to power the devourer's first foray into the planes.
Gnoll Witherling: Sometimes gnolls turn against each other, perhaps to determine who rules a war band or because of extreme starvation. Even under ordinary circumstances, gnolls that are deprived of victims for too long can't control their hunger and violent urges. Eventually, they fight among themselves. The survivors devour the flesh of their slain comrades but preserve the bones. Then, by invoking rituals to Yeenoghu, they bring the remains back to a semblance of life in the form of a gnoll witherling.
When a war band grows desperate for food, its members turn on each other. Those who succumb to the violence are devoured, but their service to the war band doesn't end at that point. The survivors preserve the bones of their fallen comrades, so that a pack lord or a flind can perform a ritual to Yeenoghu to turn them into loyal, undead followers known as witherlings.
Mind Flayer Alhoon: Mind flayers that pursue arcane magic are exiled as deviants, and for them no eternal communion with an elder brain is possible. The road to lichdom offers a way to escape the permanency of death, but that path is long and solitary. Alhoons are mind flayers that use a shortcut.
Lichdom offers salvation and the prospect of being able to pursue knowledge indefinitely. Having feasted on the brains of people when alive, a mind flayer has no compunction about feeding souls to a phylactery. The only hindrance to a mind flayer becoming a lich is the means, which is a secret some mind flayer arcanists stop at nothing to discover. Yet lichdom requires an arcane spellcaster to be at the apex of power, something many mind flayers find is far from their grasps.
Confronting this awful reality, a group of nine mind flayer deviants used their arcane magic and psionics to weave a new truth. These nine called themselves the alhoon, and ever afterward, all those who follow in their footsteps have been referred to by the same name. Alhoons can cooperate in the creation of a periapt of mind trapping, a fist-sized container made of silver, emerald, and amethyst. The process requires at least three mind flayer arcanists and the sacrifice of an equal number of souls from living victims in a three-day-long ritual of spellcasting and psionic communion. Upon its completion, free-willed undeath is conferred on the mind flayers, turning them into alhoons.
Mind Flayer Lich, Illithilich: The path to true lichdom is something only the most powerful mind flayer mages can pursue, since it requires the ability to craft a phylactery and cast the imprisonment spell.
Spawn of Kyuss: Kyuss was a high priest of Orcus who plundered corpses from necropolises to create the first spawn of Kyuss.
From a distance or in poor light, a spawn of Kyuss looks like an ordinary zombie. As it comes into clearer view, one can see scores of little green worms crawling in and out of it. These worms jump onto nearby humanoids and burrow into their flesh. A worm that penetrates a humanoid body makes its way to the creature's brain. Once inside the brain, the worm kills its host and animates the corpse, transforming it into a spawn of Kyuss that breeds more worms. The dead humanoid's soul remains trapped inside the corpse, preventing the individual from being raised or resurrected until the undead body is destroyed. The horror of being a soul imprisoned in an undead body drives a spawn of Kyuss insane.
Spawn of Kyuss Burrowing Worm power.

Banshee: ?
Beholder Death Tyrant: When a beholder sleeps, its body goes briefly dormant but its mind never stops working. The creature is fully aware, even though to an outside observer it might appear oblivious of its surroundings. Sometimes a beholder's dreams are dominated by images of itself or of other beholders (which might or might not actually exist). On extremely rare occasions when a beholder dreams of another beholder, the act creates a warp in reality- from which a new, fully formed beholder springs forth unbidden, seemingly having appeared out of thin air in a nearby space. This "offspring" might be a duplicate of the beholder that dreamed it into existence, or it could take the form of a different variety of beholder, such as a death kiss or a gazer (see "Beholder-Kin"). It might also be a truly unique creature, such as could be spawned only from the twisted imagination of a beholder, with a set of magical abilities unlike that of its parent. In most cases, the process yields one of the three principal forms of the beholder: a solitary beholder, a hive, or a death tyrant.
Crawling Claw: ?
Flameskull: ?
Ghoul: Devourers hunt humanoids, with the intent of consuming them body and soul. After a devourer brings a target to the brink of death, it pulls the victim's body in and traps the creature within its own ribcage. As the victim tries to stave off death (usually without success), the devourer tortures its soul with telepathic noise. When the victim expires, it undergoes a horrible transformation, springing forth from the devourer's body to begin its new existence as an undead servitor of the monster that spawned it.
Devourer's Imprison Soul power.
Ghast: ?
Lich: The road to lichdom offers a way to escape the permanency of death, but that path is long and solitary.
Lichdom offers salvation and the prospect of being able to pursue knowledge indefinitely. Having feasted on the brains of people when alive, a mind flayer has no compunction about feeding souls to a phylactery. The only hindrance to a mind flayer becoming a lich is the means, which is a secret some mind flayer arcanists stop at nothing to discover. Yet lichdom requires an arcane spellcaster to be at the apex of power, something many mind flayers find is far from their grasps.
Mummy: The mummies are the undead remains of yuan-ti malisons or purebloods.
Shadow: ?
Skeleton: ?
Specter: ?
Vampire: ?
Wight: Devourers hunt humanoids, with the intent of consuming them body and soul. After a devourer brings a target to the brink of death, it pulls the victim's body in and traps the creature within its own ribcage. As the victim tries to stave off death (usually without success), the devourer tortures its soul with telepathic noise. When the victim expires, it undergoes a horrible transformation, springing forth from the devourer's body to begin its new existence as an undead servitor of the monster that spawned it.
Devourer's Imprison Soul power.
Zombie: Normally usable only by a death tyrant, negative energy prevents survivors of a battle from healing and animates any dead or dying creatures as zombies under the beholder's control.
Devourers hunt humanoids, with the intent of consuming them body and soul. After a devourer brings a target to the brink of death, it pulls the victim's body in and traps the creature within its own ribcage. As the victim tries to stave off death (usually without success), the devourer tortures its soul with telepathic noise. When the victim expires, it undergoes a horrible transformation, springing forth from the devourer's body to begin its new existence as an undead servitor of the monster that spawned it.
Devourer's Imprison Soul power.
Ogre Zombie: ?
Beholder Zombie: ?

Imprison Soul. The devourer chooses a living humanoid with 0 hit points that it can see within 30 feet of it. That creature is teleported inside the devourer's ribcage and imprisoned there. A creature imprisoned in this manner has disadvantage on death saving throws. If it dies while imprisoned, the devourer regains 25 hit points, immediately recharges Soul Rend, and gains an additional action on its next turn. Additionally, at the start of its next turn, the devourer regurgitates the slain creature as a bonus action, and the creature becomes an undead. If the victim had 2 or fewer Hit Dice, it becomes a zombie. If it had 3 to 5 Hit Dice, it becomes a ghoul. Otherwise, it becomes a wight. A devourer can imprison only one creature at a time.

Burrowing Worm. A worm launches from the spawn of Kyuss at one humanoid that the spawn can see within 10 feet of it. The worm latches onto the target's skin unless the target succeeds on a DC 11 Dexterity saving throw. The worm is a Tiny undead with AC 6, l hit point, a 2 (-4) in every ability score, and a speed of 1 foot. While on the target's skin, the worm can be killed by normal means or scraped off using an action (the spawn can use this action to launch a scraped-off worm at a humanoid it can see within 10 feet of the worm). Otherwise, the worm burrows under the target's skin at the end of the target's next turn, dealing 1 piercing damage to it. At the end of each of its turns thereafter, the target takes 7 (2d6) necrotic damage per worm infesting it (maximum of 10d6). A worm-infested target dies if it drops to O hit points, then rises 10 minutes later as a spawn of Kyuss. If a worm-infested creature is targeted by an effect that cures disease or removes a curse, all the worms infesting it wither away.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Acquisitions Incorporated
5e
Jelayne, Unusual Skeleton: Jelayne wasn't one to let death keep her down, however, and she continues to lead the group as an unusual skeleton.
If the adventurers defeat the crew and study Jelayne, a successful DC 10 Intelligence (Arcana or Religion) check confirms that she was raised as undead by a unique ritual that allowed her to keep her intellect and ability to speak.
Undead Cocatrice: ?
Talanatha, Vampire Spawn: As soon as Hoobur escapes, a glowing draconic skull with a sword piercing it appears on Talanatha's fore head as she struggles against her bonds. A character who succeeds on a DC 15 Intelligence (Arcana or Religion) check can tell she's turning into an undead creature. If the check succeeds by 5 or more, the character knows the group has 2 rounds to stop the transformation. A character within 5 feet of the table must succeed on a DC 15 Intelligence (Arcana or Religion) check to remove the draconic sigil and stop the transformation. If 1he characters kill Talanatha in the hope of s topping the ritual, the change occurs immediately.
Patsy McRoyne, Ghost: The ghost and the corpse are all that remain of a deceased member of the Order of the Stout Half-Pint, Patsy McRoyne. An examination of the body reveals no weapon wounds, but a successful DC 10 Intelligence (Arcana) or Wisdom (Medicine) check finds evidence of necrotic damage. A familiar sigil has been carved into the corpse's chest-a draconic skull pierced by a sword thrust upward through it.
Lottie, Lich: ?
Lottie's Palace Staff Skeleton: ?
Jeff Magic, Lich: ?

Undead: As a necromancer, you've always had an easy time making friends. Hah! That's hilarious because your friends are undead.
Savvy players might note that the undead minions Hoobur creates to harry the party don't follow the standard rules by which a spellcaster character might create undead.
Ghost: ?
Ghoul: Hiding in the wardrobes and chests are four ghouls made from gnome and halfling corpses of members of the Order of the Stout Half-Pint.
Ghast: Courtesy of the magic of Hoobur Gran'Shoop, the rotting dragonborn reanimates as a ghast moments after anyone opens the north cell.
Lich: ?
Shadow: Hoobur Gran"Shoop's necromantic rituals have caused the humanoids slain here to come back as three shadows.
Warhorse Skeleton: The gnome archmage Hoobur Gran'Shoop animated these dead horses in the aftermath of the attack on Tresendar Manor, commanding them to lie still and attack any humanoid creatures that approach them.
If the characters poke around the rotting flesh that fell off the horses during the battle, they see that each horse bore scars on its sides that form the image of a draconic skull with a sword driven up through it from the bottom. A character who succeeds on a DC 10 Intelligence (Arcana) check recognizes the sigil as part of a unique necromantic ritual that can turn any creature into an undead creature when it dies.
Vampire: ?
Will-o'-Wisp: ?
Zombie: ?
Ogre Zombie: ?
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Baldur's Gate Descent Into Avernus
5e
Swarm of Skeletal Rats: ?
Undead Priest, Gideon Lightward: Gideon Lightward was a priest of Lathander who served Elturel and his deity proudly. Zariel saw that his fervor could be an asset to her, so she sent devils to corrupt him in the months leading up to the fall of Elturel. The devils posed as angels, offering Gideon increased power if he would dedicate himself to fighting the ever-present threat of demons.
Gideon slowly gave up his sanity and free will to the devils, leaving him corrupted by Zariel and fully serving her in the months leading up to Elturel's fall. He died during the destruction wrought as the city was drawn to Avernus, but the priest rose as an undead creature.
Dryad Spirit: In a bygone age, the night hag Red Ruth corrupted a community of dryads by fouling the roots of their trees with mind-bending poison. As the dryads fell to evil, their forest was wrenched from the Feywild into Avernus. Those dryads who resisted the poison died trying to merge back into their trees. The rest crumbled to ash and became restless, tortured spirits akin to banshees.
Undead Tree: ?
Olanthius, Death Knight: Harurnan followed his master into damnation willingly and was transformed into a narzugon devil, while Olanthius, who took his own life rather than bow before Asmodeus, was brought back to serve as a death knight under Zariel's burning gaze.
One of Zariel's generals, Olanthius, killed himself rather than embrace tyranny. Zariel raised him as a death knight to ensure his loyalty.
Olanthius took his life rather than face damnation, but he was transformed into an undead monster by Zariel to serve her forevermore.
Barnabas, Flameskull: Barnabas, once a powerful wizard, had his crypt defiled by an evil nemesis who stole his skull and turned it into a flameskull.
General Yael, Ghost: I gave up my magic and memories, and Yael gave her life to construct this place to protect the sword.
Elf Spirit: ?
Ghost, Zariel's Knight: The knights' souls are cursed to remain here. They yearn for the afterlife, but the oath they swore to Zariel binds them to her service.
Ghost, Szarr: Long ago, the graveyard was an empty estate owned by the mercantile Szarr family, with only a few family crypts near the cliffs. When a business rival murdered the entire family in their beds, no one was eager to move into their former manor, and the city decided to turn the estate into a single massive graveyard that acts as the primary repository for the city's dead.
The graveyard itself is a maze of crypts and monuments, its organization nearly impossible for outsiders to discern as the multi-chamber ossuaries of rich merchants and pirate lords loom over the simple plaques and rotting wooden holy symbols of the poor. Natural cavern systems have been expanded and shored up to create extensive crypts, yet over generations maps have been lost or poorly updated, and it's not uncommon for a gravedigger to find themselves striking the wood of a coffin where no coffin should be, or tumbling through into a forgotten stretch of tunnel. Rampant grave robbery by brigands and necromancy-obsessed followers of Myrkul only increases the chaos, as bodies get exhumed and reburied wherever it's convenient. Most significantly, a major landslide decades ago dropped a large portion of the cemetery's cliff into the river below, causing the remaining bone-houses and markers to shift and lean, while also exposing numerous crypts and tomb-tunnels to the air, prompting a fresh rush of grave robbing. Though Baldurians rarely bury their dead with valuables anymore. and many of the easier pickings have been taken, it's common wisdom that some of the greatest treasures of past centuries still lie entombed with their heroes, their headstones wiped anonymously clean by wind and rain.
Watching over all of this is the powerful Gravemakers crew. Far more than simply caretakers and laborers, the Gravemakers guard the dead-and Tumbledown-from threats. With so much death concentrated in one spot, undead are a constant problem. Skeletons and revenants regularly claw spontaneously out of their graves, while ghouls and ghasts burrow into crypts and catacombs, drawn by the scent of decaying flesh. Wights hide in their tombs by day, while ghosts and wraiths terrorize unsuspecting mortals. Putting down such threats before they can prey on citizens is the Gravemakers' primary job, and though rightfully proud of their prowess, their leader Leone Wen, a lawful good female human knight and servant of Torm, is always looking for fresh recruits or contractors to join them in their crusade. The crew operates out of the half-burned old Szarr Mansion in the cemetery's center, its moldering halls reputedly still infested by the ghosts of the murdered Szarrs-though stories remain split as to whether the ghosts prey on the Gravemakers or aid them in their duty.
Jander Sunstar, Vampire: This elf warrior, cursed to an eternity of undeath, tried to redeem his corrupted soul by swearing to hunt down his own kind.

Undead: Chronically understaffed, especially in those wards catering to poor Outer City residents, the hospital has constant security problems, from angry patients to spontaneously arising undead, unethical or experimental treatments by priests of non-good faiths, or excessive withdrawals from the stores of painkilling narcotics.
Crawling Claw: ?
Ghoul: These former citizens of the city died when Elturel was drawn into Avernus. Their souls were corrupted by the terrible power of the plane, leaving them in these undead forms.
Undead Pit.
Ghast: Undead Pit.
Mummy: Zariel's warlocks helped build the Crypt of the Hell-riders to gain infernal power in their mortal world. When they died, their cursed bodies were dragged into Avernus to guard the tomb for eternity.
Revenant: Long ago, the graveyard was an empty estate owned by the mercantile Szarr family, with only a few family crypts near the cliffs. When a business rival murdered the entire family in their beds, no one was eager to move into their former manor, and the city decided to turn the estate into a single massive graveyard that acts as the primary repository for the city's dead.
The graveyard itself is a maze of crypts and monuments, its organization nearly impossible for outsiders to discern as the multi-chamber ossuaries of rich merchants and pirate lords loom over the simple plaques and rotting wooden holy symbols of the poor. Natural cavern systems have been expanded and shored up to create extensive crypts, yet over generations maps have been lost or poorly updated, and it's not uncommon for a gravedigger to find themselves striking the wood of a coffin where no coffin should be, or tumbling through into a forgotten stretch of tunnel. Rampant grave robbery by brigands and necromancy-obsessed followers of Myrkul only increases the chaos, as bodies get exhumed and reburied wherever it's convenient. Most significantly, a major landslide decades ago dropped a large portion of the cemetery's cliff into the river below, causing the remaining bone-houses and markers to shift and lean, while also exposing numerous crypts and tomb-tunnels to the air, prompting a fresh rush of grave robbing. Though Baldurians rarely bury their dead with valuables anymore. and many of the easier pickings have been taken, it's common wisdom that some of the greatest treasures of past centuries still lie entombed with their heroes, their headstones wiped anonymously clean by wind and rain.
Watching over all of this is the powerful Gravemakers crew. Far more than simply caretakers and laborers, the Gravemakers guard the dead-and Tumbledown-from threats. With so much death concentrated in one spot, undead are a constant problem. Skeletons and revenants regularly claw spontaneously out of their graves, while ghouls and ghasts burrow into crypts and catacombs, drawn by the scent of decaying flesh.
Shadow: Undead Pit.
Skeleton: If one or more of the black candles on the altar are lit, they shed a green light that reveals black writing on the walls. The writing, which is not visible otherwise, says in Common, "RISE AND BE COUNTED!" If these words are spoken aloud within 5 feet of the altar, the words vanish as bones hidden under the debris at the north end of the room rise up and knit together, forming three animated human skeletons. The skeletons are evil undead, but they obey the commands of whoever spoke the words that raised them, serving that individual until they're destroyed or their master is killed.
A squad of Baphomet's minotaurs attempted to overrun the chapel, but Gideon and his servants slew them. Gideon then turned them into four minotaur skeletons that attack as soon as any character enters this area.
Long ago, the graveyard was an empty estate owned by the mercantile Szarr family, with only a few family crypts near the cliffs. When a business rival murdered the entire family in their beds, no one was eager to move into their former manor, and the city decided to turn the estate into a single massive graveyard that acts as the primary repository for the city's dead.
The graveyard itself is a maze of crypts and monuments, its organization nearly impossible for outsiders to discern as the multi-chamber ossuaries of rich merchants and pirate lords loom over the simple plaques and rotting wooden holy symbols of the poor. Natural cavern systems have been expanded and shored up to create extensive crypts, yet over generations maps have been lost or poorly updated, and it's not uncommon for a gravedigger to find themselves striking the wood of a coffin where no coffin should be, or tumbling through into a forgotten stretch of tunnel. Rampant grave robbery by brigands and necromancy-obsessed followers of Myrkul only increases the chaos, as bodies get exhumed and reburied wherever it's convenient. Most significantly, a major landslide decades ago dropped a large portion of the cemetery's cliff into the river below, causing the remaining bone-houses and markers to shift and lean, while also exposing numerous crypts and tomb-tunnels to the air, prompting a fresh rush of grave robbing. Though Baldurians rarely bury their dead with valuables anymore. and many of the easier pickings have been taken, it's common wisdom that some of the greatest treasures of past centuries still lie entombed with their heroes, their headstones wiped anonymously clean by wind and rain.
Watching over all of this is the powerful Gravemakers crew. Far more than simply caretakers and laborers, the Gravemakers guard the dead-and Tumbledown-from threats. With so much death concentrated in one spot, undead are a constant problem. Skeletons and revenants regularly claw spontaneously out of their graves, while ghouls and ghasts burrow into crypts and catacombs, drawn by the scent of decaying flesh.
Undead Pit.
Minotaur Skeleton: Slain servants of Baphomet stripped of flesh and animated by Gideon using the power of the Companion.
Specter: As Olanthius moves through the catacombs, he compels any ghosts he encounters to fight at his side. Any ghosts that the characters summoned from the urns in the funerary chambers transform into specters under Olanthius's command and join him on his hunt.
Undead Pit.
Vampire Lord: ?
Wight: Undead Pit.
Will-o'-Wisp: ?
Wraith: Being entombed in Avernus has corrupted the spirits of these knights.
Undead Pit.
Zombie: Flennis is preparing to make a zombie out of the corpse on the table, but the animate dead spell takes 1 minute to cast, which means she must deal with the characters first.
The shambling corpses are six zombies created by Flennis from the remains of the Dead Three cultists' murder victims.
Undead Pit.

Undead Pit
The path around the chapel has been sundered by a deep hole in the ground, filled with a putrid purple mist. The haze filling the hole blocks any sense of how deep it might be, or of what might lie within.
Gideon creates his undead servants in this 30-foot-deep pit, which was formed when a piece of the meteor that struck the High Hall splintered off.
Necromantic Mist. The mist is formed by necromantic energy emitted from the corrupted Companion. A successful DC 10 Intelligence (Investigation) check made to study the mist reveals that it pulsates in sync with the crackling energy of the corrupted Companion. Any creature that enters the mist for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there takes 5 (1d10) necrotic damage. Climbing the sides of the pit without equipment requires a successful DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check. Whenever Gideon directs his minions to toss a dead body into the pit, an undead creature crawls forth one hour later. Newly created undead patiently wander the cemetery grounds until Gideon gives them orders. One undead creature appears during the time the characters investigate the pit, and more can appear if they leave this area, then return again while Gideon is still at large. Use the Undead Creation table to determine what kind of undead creature is created.
UNDEAD CREATION
d20 Undead
1-4 Skeleton
5-7 Zombie
8-10 Shadow
11-12 Specter
13-15 Ghoul
16-17 Ghast
18-19 Wight
20 Wraith
 
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Voadam

Adventurer
Curse of Strahd
5e
Phantom Warrior: A phantom warrior is the spectral remnant of a willful soldier or knight who perished on the battlefield or died performing its sworn duty.
Although one is often mistaken for a ghost, a phantom warrior isn't bound by a yearning to complete some unresolved goal. It can choose to end its undead existence at any time. Its spirit lingers willingly, either out of loyalty to its former master or because it believes it must perform a task to satisfy its honor or sense of duty. For example, a guard who dies defending a wall might return as a phantom warrior and continue guarding the wall, then disappear forever once a new guard assumes its post or the wall is destroyed. The period between the time it died and the time it rises as a phantom warrior is usually 24 hours.
Strahd Zombie: Created from the long-dead guards of Castle Ravenloft, they were called into being through dark magic by Strahd himself.
These undead soldiers once served as guards in Castle Ravenloft. They fled the castle after Strahd became a vampire but couldn't avoid their master's wrath.
Vladimir Horngaard, Revenant: Vladimir Horngaard joined the Order of the Silver Dragon at a young age and quickly earned the friendship of its founder, the silver dragon Argynvost. When he became a knight of the order, he traveled to distant lands to wage war against the forces of evil. The dragon stayed home and, in the guise of a human noble named Lord Argynvost, brought new initiates into the order.
Enemies of Strahd. Vladimir found himself fighting Strahd's armies time and again as they swept across the land. When it became clear that Strahd couldn't be stopped, the knights of the order led hundreds of refugees to Argynvost's valley, but Strahd tracked them to their sanctuary and overwhelmed them with a vast force. Vladimir, whom Argynvost had made a field commander, couldn't hold back the evil tide and was killed, only after the heartbreak of witnessing Strahd himself slay Vladimir's beloved, his fellow knight Sir Godfrey Gwilym. With the battle won, Strahd surrounded Argynvostholt. Rather than cower in his lair, Argynvost emerged and battled Strahd's armies to the bitter end.
Deadly Vengeance. Unwilling to accept his failure, Vladimir returned as a revenant. So great was his hatred of Strahd and his thirst for vengeance that those feelings fueled the spirits of many of his fellow knights—including Godfrey—to come back as revenants as well.
The death of Argynvost enraged the spirit of Vladimir Horngaard, the greatest of the dragon's knights. Horngaard returned as a revenant and swore to avenge the destruction of the order.
"If you have come to destroy me, know this: I perished defending this land from evil over four centuries ago, and because of my failure, I am forever doomed.”
Sir Godfrey Gwilym, Revenant: Unwilling to accept his failure, Vladimir returned as a revenant. So great was his hatred of Strahd and his thirst for vengeance that those feelings fueled the spirits of many of his fellow knights—including Godfrey—to come back as revenants as well.
Lord Ruthven, Vampire: ?
Spirit, Phantom, Ghostly Adventurer: Spirits drift along the Old Svalich Road toward Castle Ravenloft in the dead of night. These phantoms are all that remain of Strahd's enemies, and this damnable fate awaits anyone who opposes him.
Every night at midnight, one hundred spirits rise from the cemetery and march up the Old Svalich Road to Castle Ravenloft.
These aren't the spirits of the people buried here, but of previous adventurers who died trying to destroy Strahd. Every night, the ghostly adventurers attempt to complete their quest, and each night they fail.
Skeletal Rider, Skeleton: The human skeleton and warhorse skeleton are all that remain of a rider and mount, both of whom perished trying to escape through the fog that surrounds Barovia. They are doomed to ride through the valley in search of another way out, without hope of salvation.
Skeletal Rider, Warhorse Skeleton: The human skeleton and warhorse skeleton are all that remain of a rider and mount, both of whom perished trying to escape through the fog that surrounds Barovia. They are doomed to ride through the valley in search of another way out, without hope of salvation.
Doru, Vampire Spawn: ?
Crawling Strahd Zombie: The groans are coming from a Strahd zombie that is missing both of its legs, so that only its head, torso, and arms remain.
Helga Ruvak, Vampire Spawn: ?
Pidlwick, Ghost: If asked how he died, he replies humorlessly, "I fell down the stairs." If Pidlwick II is with the party, the ghost points at the clockwork effigy and says, "He pushed me down the stairs."
Tormented Spirit, Varushka: The spirit of Varushka, a maid, haunts this chamber. She took her own life when Strahd began feeding on her, denying him the chance to turn her into a vampire spawn.
Escher, Vampire Spawn: ?
Prince Ariel du Plumette, Ariel the Heavy, Ghost: Prince Ariel was a terrible man who longed to fly. He
attached artificial wings to a harness and empowered the device with magic, but the apparatus still couldn't bear his weight, and he plunged from the Pillarstone of Ravenloft to his death.
Khazan, Lich: Khazan was a powerful archmage who unlocked the secrets of lichdom, then later tried to become a demilich and failed.
Sasha Ivliskova, Vampire Spawn: ?
Patrina Velikovna, Banshee: In life, Patrina Velikovna was a dusk elf who, having learned a great deal about the black arts, was nearly a match for Strahd's powers. She felt a great bond with him and asked to solemnize that bond in a dark marriage. Drawn to her knowledge and power, Strahd consented, but before he could drain all life from Patrina, her own people stoned her to death in an act of mercy to thwart Strahd's plans. Strahd demanded, and got, Patrina's body. She then became the banshee trapped here.
Sir Klutz Tripalotsky, Phantom Warrior: If the sword is pulled from the armor, Sir Klutz appears as a phantom warrior, thanks whoever pulled his weapon free, and agrees to fight alongside that character for the next seven days. Sir Klutz perished years before Strahd became a vampire, so the phantom warrior knows nothing of Strahd's downfall or the curse afflicting Barovia.
Kroval "Mad Dog" Grislek, Master of the Hunt, Wraith: ?
Ludmilla Vilisevic, Vampire Spawn: ?
Anastrasya Karelova, Vampire Spawn: ?
Valenta Popofsky, Vampire Spawn: ?
Assassin's Ghost: The entity in the mirror is the spirit of a nameless assassin who once belonged to a secret society called the Ba'al Verzi.
Father Lucian, Vampire Spawn: During the chaos, Strahd enters the church in bat form, then reverts to vampire form and attacks Father Lucian. Unless the characters intervene, Strahd kills the priest before returning to Castle Ravenloft.
If Father Lucian dies, locals bury his body in the church cemetery, whereupon it rises the following night as a vampire spawn under Strahd's control.
Snow Maiden: ?
Lazlo Ulrich, Ghost: Strahd refuses to let Burgomaster Ulrich's spirit find rest because of what he did to poor Marina.
Exethanter, Lich: The wizards were dead and gone by the time an evil archmage named Exethanter arrived at the temple. He breached the temple's wards, spoke to a vestige trapped in amber, and discovered the secret to becoming a lich.
Rosavalda Durst, Rose, Ghost: The Durst children, Rose and Thorn, were neglected by their parents and locked in this room until they starved to death.
If asked how they died, Rose and Thorn explain that their parents locked them in the attic to protect them from "the monster in the basement," and that they died from hunger.
Thornboldt Durst, Thorn, Ghost: The Durst children, Rose and Thorn, were neglected by their parents and locked in this room until they starved to death.
If asked how they died, Rose and Thorn explain that their parents locked them in the attic to protect them from "the monster in the basement," and that they died from hunger.
Baron Metus, Vampire: ?
Erasmus Van Richten, Vampire: ?

Strahd von Zarovich, Vampire: Unwilling to go the way of his father, Strahd studied magic and forged a pact with the Dark Powers of the Shadowfell in return for the promise of immortality.
Strahd's attention soon turned to Tatyana, a young Barovian woman of fine lineage and remarkable beauty. Strahd believed her to be a worthy bride, and he lavished Tatyana with gifts and attention. Despite Strahd's efforts, she instead fell in love with the younger, warmer Sergei. Strahd's pride prevented him from standing in the way of the young couple's love until the day of Sergei and Tatyana's wedding, when Strahd gazed into a mirror and realized he had been a fool. Strahd murdered Sergei and drank his blood, sealing the evil pact between Strahd and the Dark Powers. He then chased Sergei's bride-to-be through the gardens, determined to make her accept and love him. Tatyana hurled herself off a castle balcony to escape Strahd's pursuit, plunging to her death. Treacherous castle guards, seizing the opportunity to rid the world of Strahd forever, shot their master with arrows.
But Strahd did not die. The Dark Powers honored the pact they had made. The sky went black as Strahd turned on the guards, his eyes blazing red. He had become a vampire.
When Strahd came to the temple seeking immortality, Exethanter sensed that he was a man of destiny. The evil powers in the temple felt something much stronger: a darkness that eclipsed their own. Strahd communed with these evil vestiges and forged a pact with them. When Strahd later murdered his brother Sergei, that pact was sealed with blood. Strahd transformed into a vampire, and the Dark Powers turned his land into a prison.
“I made a pact with death, a pact of blood. On the day of the wedding, I killed Sergei, my brother. My pact was sealed with his blood.”
“Arrows from the castle guards pierced me to my soul, but I did not die. Nor did I live. I became undead, forever.
Ghost: This particular ghost is all that remains of a person drained of life by Strahd.
Vampire Spawn: Strahd has been the master of Ravenloft for centuries now. Since becoming a vampire, he has taken several consorts-none as beloved as Tatyana, but each a person of beauty. All of them he turned into vampire spawn.
Revenant: The revenant was a knight of the Order of the Silver Dragon, which was annihilated defending the valley against Strahd's armies more than four centuries ago. The revenant no longer remembers its name and wanders the land in search of Strahd's wolves and other minions, slaying them on sight.
The death of Argynvost enraged the spirit of Vladimir Horngaard, the greatest of the dragon's knights. Horngaard returned as a revenant and swore to avenge the destruction of the order. His zeal was so great that it also brought back the spirits of several other knights, who rose as revenants under Vladimir's command.
Zombie: These unfortunate Barovians fell prey to the evils of the land and now shamble from place to place as a ravenous mob.
Cyrus explains that he just isn't the cook he used to be, and his meals tend to get out of hand these days.
Will-o'-Wisp: ?
Ghoul: ?
Crawling Claw: ?
Shadow: They are the remnants of dark souls that perished here long ago.
Wight: These undead soldiers once served as guard captains in Castle Ravenloft.
Specter: The bedroom once belonged to the family's nursemaid. The master of the house and the nursemaid had an affair, which led to the birth of a stillborn baby named Walter. The cult slew the nursemaid shortly thereafter. The nursemaid's spirit haunts the bedroom as a specter.
Near an iron stove, underneath one of the sheets, is an unlocked wooden trunk containing the skeletal remains of the family's nursemaid, wrapped in a tattered bedsheet stained with dry blood. A character inspecting the remains and succeeding on a DC 14 Wisdom (Medicine) check can verify that the woman was stabbed to death by multiple knife wounds.
Skeleton: Whenever a wight is killed in this vault, some of the bones knit together, forming 2d6 animated human skeletons.
Buried under the earthen floor are eight human skeletons-the animated remains of dead Vallakians that were stolen from the church cemetery and animated by Lady Wachter. They rise up and attack intruders who cross the floor.
Flameskull: After his transformation, the lich Exethanter took over the temple and turned the skulls of it previous defenders into flameskulls under his command.
Flameskulls-constructs made from the remains of dead wizards-guard the temple.
Demilich: ?
Poltergeist: An amber golem once stood guard here, but it escaped after thieves broke into the treasury and looted it. The golem has since made its way upstairs.
Not all of the thieves escaped, and the pulverized remains of those who died here lie strewn upon the floor. Their restless spirits survive here as four poltergeists
Vampire: West Sarcophagus. The vestige within this sarcophagus offers "the dark gift of the Vampyr" to any humanoid creature of evil alignment that touches it. The Vampyr's gift is the immortality of undeath. If the dark gift is accepted, its effect doesn't occur until the following conditions are met, in the order given below. The creature becomes aware of the conditions only after accepting the dark gift.
The beneficiary slays another humanoid that loves or reveres him or her, then drinks the dead humanoid's blood within 1 hour of slaying it.
The beneficiary dies a violent death at the hands of one or more creatures that hate it.
When the conditions are met, the beneficiary instantly becomes a vampire under the Dungeon Master's control (use the stat block in the Monster Manual).
After receiving the dark gift, the beneficiary gains the following flaw: "I am surrounded by hidden enemies that seek to destroy me. I can't trust anyone."
Lich: South Sarcophagus. The vestige within this sarcophagus offers "the dark gift of Tenebrous" to any humanoid creature of evil alignment that can cast 9th-level wizard spells. Tenebrous's gift is the secret of lichdom. This dark gift grants its beneficiary the knowledge needed to perform the following tasks:
Craft a phylactery and imbue it with the power to contain the beneficiary's soul
Concoct a potion of transformation that turns the beneficiary into a lich Construction of the phylactery takes 10 days. Concocting the potion takes 3 days. The two items can't be crafted concurrently. When the beneficiary drinks the potion, he or she instantly transforms into a Lich under the Dungeon Master's control (use the stat block in the Monster Manual, altering the Lich's prepared spells as desired).
The beneficiary of this dark gift gains the following flaw: "All I care about is acquiring new magic and arcane knowledge."
Shadow: ?
Ghast: ?
 
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Voadam

Adventurer
DM Basic Rules V0.5
5e
Undead: Undead are once-living creatures brought to a horrifying state of undeath through the practice of necromantic magic or some unholy curse.
Banshee: The woeful banshee is a spiteful creature formed from the spirit of a female elf.
Flameskull: ?
Ghost: A ghost is the soul of a once-living creature, bound to haunt a location, creature, or object from its life.
Ghoul: ?
Mummy: Raised by dark funerary rituals and still wrapped in the shrouds of death, mummies shamble out from lost temples and tombs to slay any who disturb their rest.
Skeleton: ?
Wight: ?
Zombie: A humanoid slain by a wight's life drain attack rises 24 hours later as a zombie under the wight’s control, unless the humanoid is restored to life or its body is destroyed.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Dragon+: Six Faces of Death (5e)
5e
Vargo, Skull Lord: Created from the bodies of three evil adventurers, the skull lord Vargo has spent hundreds of years in Acheron.
Vargo was once three evil adventurers who teamed up to defeat the devil Earl Andromalius. When they were defeated, Andromalius subjected them to a horrific curse, combining the three of them into a single undead being.
Pixelated Skeleton: Every body in the room is an undead creature, culled from the endless supply of bodies at area 6.39 and raised by the skull lord using necromantic rituals.
Pixelated Zombie: Every body in the room is an undead creature, culled from the endless supply of bodies at area 6.39 and raised by the skull lord using necromantic rituals.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set Stranger Things
5e
Undead: Once-living creatures brought to a horrifying state of undeath through the practice of necromantic magic or some unholy curse.
Flameskull: Spellcasters fashion flameskulls from the remains of dead wizards. When the ritual is complete, green flames erupt from the skull to complete its ghastly transformation.
Ghoul: ?
Skeleton: Assemblages of bones animated by dark magic, skeletons heed the summons of those who create them or rise of their own accord in places saturated with deathly magic.
Zombie: Zombies are corpses imbued with a semblance of life.
The mightiest wizards learn to conjure elementals from other planes of existence, glimpse the future, or turn slain foes into zombies.
Vampire: ?
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Dungeon Master's Guide
5e
Avatar of Death: ?
Elfshadow: ?
Kas the Bloody Handed: ?
Kaius, Vampire: ?
Ctenmiir, Vampire: ?

Undead: Perhaps a wizard unlocks the secret to immortality (or undeath) and spends eons exploring the farthest reaches of the multiverse.
The Death domain is concerned with the forces that cause death, as well as the negative energy that gives rise to undead creatures.
Banshee: ?
Beholder Death Tyrant: ?
Crawling Claw: ?
Death Knight: The Book of Vile Darkness could hold a ritual that allows a character to become a lich or death knight.
Demilich: ?
Acererak Archlich: ?
Adult Blue Dracolich: ?
Flameskull: ?
Ghost: The rakshasa master of a nearby monastery performs rituals to raise troubled ghosts from their rest.
Ghoul: ?
Ghast: ?
Lich: A wizard might steal the items needed to create a phylactery and become a lich.
The Book of Vile Darkness could hold a ritual that allows a character to become a lich or death knight.
Mummy: ?
Mummy Lord: ?
Lich-God Vecna, The Whispered One, The Master of the Spider Throne, The Undying King, The Lord of the Rotted Tower: Orcus, the demon prince of undeath, taught Vecna a ritual that would allow him to live on as a lich.
Revenant: ?
Shadow: ?
Skeleton: ?
Minotaur Skeleton: ?
Warhorse Skeleton: ?
Specter: ?
Specter Poltergeist: ?
Vampire: ?
Vampire Spawn: ?
Count Strahd Von Zarovich: ?
Vampire Warrior: ?
Vampire Spellcaster: ?
Wight: Artifact Major Detrimental Property 81-85.
Will-o'-Wisp: ?
Wraith: ?
Zombie: Any creature besides Orcus that tries to attune to the Wand of Orcus must make a DC 17 Constitution saving throw. On a successful save, the creature takes 10d6 necrotic damage. On a failed save, the creature dies and rises as a zombie.
Ogre Zombie: ?
Beholder Zombie: ?

Artifact Major Detrimental Property
Property 81-85 Each time you become attuned to the artifact, you age 3d10 years. You must succeed on a DC 10 Constitution saving throw or die from the shock. If you die, you are instantly transformed into a wight under the DM's control that is sworn to protect the artifact.
 
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Voadam

Adventurer
Dungeons & Dragons vs Rick and Morty
5e
Undead: Once-living creatures brought to a horrifying state of undeath through the practice of necromantic magic or some unholy curse.
Flameskull: Spellcasters fashion flameskulls from the remains of dead wizards. When the ritual is complete, green flames erupt from the skull to complete its ghastly transformation.
Ghoul: ?
Skeleton: Assemblages of bones animated by dark magic, skeletons heed the summons of those who create them.
Zombie: The mightiest wizards learn to conjure elementals from other planes of existence, glimpse the future, or turn slain foes into zombies.
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Eberron: Rising from the Last War
5e
Karrnathi Undead Soldier: Over decades, a high priest named Malevanor worked with the necromancers of the Blood of Vol to develop the Odakyr Rites, which grant Karrnathi undead the ability to make tactical decisions and operate without direct guidance. The Odakyr Rites work only when performed on the remains of a soldier slain in battle, and only in manifest zones tied to the plane of Mabar. The most significant such zones in Karrnath exist in the cities of Atur and Odakyr (now called Fort Bones). The number of Karrnathi undead soldiers steadily increased over the course of the war, with the losses of Karrnath's living troops offset by the recovery and raising of their remains. Malevanor claimed that Karrnathi undead are animated and granted intelligence by the patriotic spirit of Karrnath. However, many Karrns fear that the undead are vessels for a darker power-and that Lady Illmarrow or someone else will turn the undead against the living.
While we'd like to take the abactor at his word, our research shows that Malevanor was personally involved in the program that produced the infamous Karrnathi undead soldiers.
Erandis Vol, Erandis d'Vol, Lady Illmarrow, Queen of Death, Lich: Even as dragons and elves fought to destroy the line of Vol, a child was born to the house: Erandis. A scion of elf and dragon, Erandis bore a Mark of Death unlike any other. In time, it might have been her gateway to immortality and unrivaled power, but she was hunted down and killed long before she could master the mark's magic. Her mother, Minara Vol, escaped with her daughter's body to the icy reaches of Farlnen, far from the conflict. There, Minara unleashed all her necromantic power to raise Erandis as a lich.
Undying, Deathless: The undying are undead creatures sustained by positive energy or the devotion of mortal beings. Where strong negative emotions can trap a spirit as a ghost or wraith, the undying are spirits who linger because they are cherished and who in turn seek to protect and guide the people of their community. Though it's possible for undying to appear anywhere, it is rare for them to manifest naturally. The only place where they are found in significant numbers is the island of Aerenal, a land whose close ties to the plane of Irian suffuse it with positive energy. The elves of Aerenal spent thousands of years working to develop rituals that tap into this energy, allowing them to preserve their greatest citizens as undying.
The light of Irian sustains the spirit, but it doesn't preserve the physical body. The undying appear as desiccated corpses, their flesh withering away over centuries. At the same time, the spirit of the undying surrounds the body-an aura of light forming a spectral shadow of the soul. The light shed by an undying doesn't generate heat, but it provides a sense of warmth and comfort.
Necromancy is a pillar of Aereni society, distinct from the sinister power most adventurers encounter. Positive energy sustains the deathless undead of Aerenal-both the light of Irian and the devotion freely given by their descendants.
Ascendant Councilor: The most powerful of the undying can separate their spirits from their physical forms, existing as beings of pure light. This state is the ultimate goal of the elves of Aerenal, and such beings are known as ascendant councilors.
Undying Councilor: ?
Undying Soldier: ?
Old Dalaen, Ghost: ?
Mist Apparition: ?
Pfinston Nezzelech, Ghost: The ghost of a gnome inquisitive who died when the old city collapsed during the War of the Mark.
Lich-Priest Gath: ?
Abactor Hask Malevanor, Mummy: ?
King Kaius ir'Wynarn III, Kaius I, Vampire: ?

Undead: The Mourning had no effect on existing undead, and a large number of new undead came into being when the cataclysm occurred. Various spirits (such as ghosts and specters) linger near the places where they died, and the corpses that litter an abandoned battlefield might rise up to continue fighting whenever a living creature comes near. Some of these entities are similar to undead that might be encountered outside the Mournland, but others have alterations that are tied to the unusual manner of their deaths.
Most colossi are tombs, filled with the bodies of the crews that perished in the cataclysm. But the Mourning affected everything in bizarre ways, so a venture inside a colossus is often terrifying. A horrific monster might have made its lair in a colossus's interior in the years since the Mourning. The master docent in another one might speak through the brass horns that the crews used to communicate, growing increasingly incoherent and/or sinister. The crew of a colossus might be undead-zombies lumbering through the colossus's interior, or spirits doomed to haunt it until they can find blessed release.
The Emerald Claw violates graves near a small village, animating the corpses into undead laborers to help build an eldritch machine.
A victim who was killed by a House Tarkanan assassin returns as an undead that tries to kill anyone who bears an aberrant mark.
In the sewers below Sham, a mad necromancer puts the final touches on a device that will turn the city's residents into undead.
Six years ago, shortly after Kaius's accession, a figure known as Lady Illmarrow emerged as the leader of the Order of the Emerald Claw. Few of her followers know anything about her, other than her great skill as a necromancer; many members of the Order refer to her as Queen of the Dead. Some members of the order believe she will ultimately raise Karrnath above all other nations. Others simply trust that she will grant them personal power. They believe that she is poised to become a god of death, and that when she ascends to divinity, they will be granted immortality or at least the eternal life of undeath.
Incorporeal Undead: Dolurrh Manifest Zone feature.
Banshee: Dolurrh Manifest Zone feature.
Dracolich: ?
Ghost: As a barbarian, you could have been a simple peasant caught in the Mourning. Everyone else in your community was killed, but their spirits were bound to you. Your barbarian rage represents you channeling these vengeful ghosts.
The Talentan reverence for spirits derives from the fact that a variety of spirits haunt the Plains. The region contains an unusual number of manifest zones tied to Dolurrh and Thelanis. Ghosts are more likely to linger in such places, and minor fey are scattered across the Plains.
Shadukar is a grim reminder of the cost of the war. Once known as the Jewel of the Sound, this coastal city was destroyed in a bitter siege against Karrnathi forces. The city has yet to be reclaimed, and it's said to be haunted both by Thrane ghosts and by undead forces left behind by the Karrns.
The Panaceum has an altar that can be used to perform raise dead, but this service isn't without its risks. Sometimes the wrong spirit returns to a body, or malevolent ghosts or wraiths might escape from the netherworld along with the person being raised.
No one knows exactly; what lurks in Old Sharn. The ruins could contain ghosts or other undead, the vengeful spirits of the aberrant-marked people who took refuge in the fallen city.
Today, the district known as Fallen is strewn with the rubble of the fallen tower, mingled with shattered buildings and broken statues. Those who venture into Fallen must deal with the Ravers, feral savages that lurk in the shadows. There's no question that the Ravers exist, but their true nature remains a subject of debate. A common hypothesis is that they're the descendants of the original inhabitants of the district, who were possessed and driven mad by the ghosts of those who died when the tower fell.
The Mourning had no effect on existing undead, and a large number of new undead came into being when the cataclysm occurred. Various spirits (such as ghosts and specters) linger near the places where they died, and the corpses that litter an abandoned battlefield might rise up to continue fighting whenever a living creature comes near. Some of these entities are similar to undead that might be encountered outside the Mournland, but others have alterations that are tied to the unusual manner of their deaths.
Ghosts might linger in a manifest zone associated with Dolurrh.
Strong negative emotions can trap a spirit as a ghost or wraith.
Dolurrh Manifest Zone feature.
Ghoul: ?
Lich: ?
Mummy: ?
Revenant: Murdered by House Cannith assassins after she learned too much about the house's secret research.
Shadow: Dolurrh Manifest Zone feature.
Skeleton: Early in the Last War, Karrnath turned to the necromancers of the Blood of Vol to bolster the nation's army with undead forces. The skeletons and zombies created by the necromancers were mindless creatures that required guidance.
Specter: The Mourning had no effect on existing undead, and a large number of new undead came into being when the cataclysm occurred. Various spirits (such as ghosts and specters) linger near the places where they died, and the corpses that litter an abandoned battlefield might rise up to continue fighting whenever a living creature comes near. Some of these entities are similar to undead that might be encountered outside the Mournland, but others have alterations that are tied to the unusual manner of their deaths.
Dolurrh Manifest Zone feature.
Poltergeist: ?
Vampire: ?
Wraith: The Panaceum has an altar that can be used to perform raise dead, but this service isn't without its risks. Sometimes the wrong spirit returns to a body, or malevolent ghosts or wraiths might escape from the netherworld along with the person being raised.
Strong negative emotions can trap a spirit as a ghost or wraith.
Dolurrh Manifest Zone feature.
Zombie: You lost a lot of friends in battle, but what made it worse was watching that cackling wizard raise them as zombies and turn them against you.
Most colossi are tombs, filled with the bodies of the crews that perished in the cataclysm. But the Mourning affected everything in bizarre ways, so a venture inside a colossus is often terrifying. A horrific monster might have made its lair in a colossus's interior in the years since the Mourning. The master docent in another one might speak through the brass horns that the crews used to communicate, growing increasingly incoherent and/or sinister. The crew of a colossus might be undead-zombies lumbering through the colossus's interior, or spirits doomed to haunt it until they can find blessed release.
Investigating disappearances among an elf community reveals that the Order of the Emerald Claw has been attempting to inscribe something like a dragonmark in their skin, then reanimating the failed experiments as zombies.
A humanoid reduced to 0 hit points by damage damage from Lady Illmarrow's poison breath dies and rises at the start of Illmarrow's next turn as a zombie.
Early in the Last War, Karrnath turned to the necromancers of the Blood of Vol to bolster the nation's army with undead forces. The skeletons and zombies created by the necromancers were mindless creatures that required guidance.
Mabaran Resonator eldritch machine.
Mournland Environmental Effect.

MABARAN RESONATOR This dread device draws on the power of Mabar, infusing the dead with the malign energy of the Endless Night. While it is active, any humanoid that dies within 2 miles of the resonator reanimates 1 minute later as a zombie (see the Monster Manual for its stat block) under the control of the creature controlling the device.

DOLURRH MANIFEST ZONE FEATURES
d4 Feature
1 Bodies buried here reanimate in 1d4 days, possessed by restless spirits. These spirits might be malevolent or benign.
2 Any necromancy spell of 1st level or higher cast within the zone is treated as if it were cast at a level one higher than the spell slot that was expended.
3 Spells and abilities that raise the dead have a 50 percent chance to bring back 1d4 angry spirits as well. These might be banshees, ghosts, shadows, specters, wraiths, or other incorporeal undead.
4 In order to cast a spell of 1st level or higher in the zone, the caster must succeed on a Constitution check with a DC equal to 10 +the level of the spell. On a failed check, the spell is not cast and its spell slot is not expended, but the action is lost.

MOURNLAND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS
d8 Effect
1 Healing spells are impeded here. Any spell that restores hit points does so as if it were cast at a level one lower than the spell slot expended. A spell cast using a 1st-level slot restores no hit points.
2 A character who casts a spell must make a Constitution saving throw against the character's own spell save DC. On a failed save, the character takes psychic damage equal to the spell's level and gains one level of exhaustion.
3 Any Medium humanoid that dies in the area reanimates as a zombie at the start of its next turn. The zombie is under the DM's control.
4 The area is affected by a silence spell.
5 Each creature that enters the area is affected by an enlarge/reduce spell, with an equal chance for each effect. The effect lasts until the creature leaves the area.
6 The pull of gravity is lessened. Creatures can jump twice the normal distance in any direction, and everything effectively weighs half its actual weight.
7 All creatures are linked to every other creature in the area as if by the telepathy spell.
8 A creature that casts a spell of 1st level or higher in the area rolls on the Wild Magic Surge table in chapter 3 of the Player's Handbook.
 
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Voadam

Adventurer
Essentials Kit
5e
Lady Alagondar's Skeletal Horse, Undead Riding Horse: ?
Vyldara, Banshee: The site was abandoned and sealed up long years ago after being haunted by a banshee-the restless spirit of a moon elf ambassador named Vyldara who tried and failed to foment civil unrest among the dwarves. The dwarves imprisoned the elf and sent messages to her people, asking that they come to collect her. Before envoys could be sent, Vyldara killed two guards trying to escape, only to be cut down by dwarven axes before she could succeed.
Miraal, Banshee: Miraal was a sea elf killed by Moesko, who took her spellcasting focus-an opalescent conch as a trophy.
Axeholm's Dwarf Castellan, Ghoul: ?

Undead: Once-living creatures brought to a horrifying state of undeath through the practice of necromantic magic or some unholy curse.
Banshee: A banshee is the hateful spirit of a once-beautiful female elf.
Ghoul: When the elf's evil spirit started filling Axeholm's halls with deathly wails, the dwarves abandoned their stronghold, but not before several dwarves slain by the banshee arose as ghouls to feed on their kin.
Will-o'-Wisp: ?
Strahd von Zarovich: ?
 

Voadam

Adventurer
Ghosts of Saltmarsh
5e
Bodak: These soulless terrors, each one risen from the remains of someone who revered Orcus, Lord of the Undead. exist only to spread further suffering and death.
Drowned Ascetic: ?
Drowned Assassin: ?
Drowned Blade: ?
Drowned Master: ?
Skeletal Alchemist: ?
Skeletal Juggernaut: ?
Skeletal Swarm: This swarm of bones found rising out of the sand in Isle of the Abbey is made from the remains of several animated skeletons.
Drowned One, Walker: The pirates, now fully under Orcus's thrall, emerged from the wreckage and marched across the seabed to Firewatch Island. They overran the garrison and carried the remains back to their wrecked ship. There, with Orcus's instruction, they began the laborious process of opening the Pit of Hatred, a rift to the Abyss that can transform corpses into drowned ones.
Feeding off the captain's rage and hate as he died, the energy of the rift animated Tammeraut's crew and turned them into drowned ones.
Xolec, Vampire: ?
Zombified Starfish: ?
Zombified Anemone: ?
Zombified Harmless Aquatic Beast: ?
Captain Ineca Sufocan, Elf Vampire: ?
Syrgaul Tammeraut, Drowned Master: The sinking of Tammeraut did not spell the end for Syrgaul and his band of pirates. As his ship plunged into the sea. he called out to his fiendish patron. Orcus heeded his call and imbued Syrgaul and his crew with undeath, the twisted form of immortality he offers his followers.
Calimara, Ghost: Calimara and Alina are the ghosts of missionaries that died in the brig along with the high priest when the ship sank.
Alina, Ghost: Calimara and Alina are the ghosts of missionaries that died in the brig along with the high priest when the ship sank.

Undead: The sinking of Tammeraut did not spell the end for Syrgaul and his band of pirates. As his ship plunged into the sea. he called out to his fiendish patron. Orcus heeded his call and imbued Syrgaul and his crew with undeath, the twisted form of immortality he offers his followers.
Off the coast, near heavily trafficked sea lanes, cultists of Orcus create a gateway on the seabed that links to the Abyss. The water above swirls and plunges downward, creating a whirlpool that devours ships and sea life.
Living creatures pulled to the bottom of the whirlpool are slain, warped with Abyssal energy, and unleashed into the sea as undead creatures. Unless someone finds the gate, slips through it into the Abyss, and destroys the unhallowed site found on the other side, the whirlpool will unleash a horde of undead sailors and sea creatures that can transform the region around it into a dead zone.
Ghost ships are incorporeal vessels that carry undead crews. The crews often died in a grisly manner and have unfinished business that keeps them tethered to the Material Plane.
Skeleton: If a skeletal juggernaut is reduced to 0 hit points, twelve skeletons rise from its remains.
Ghost ships are incorporeal vessels that carry undead crews. The crews often died in a grisly manner and have unfinished business that keeps them tethered to the Material Plane.
Vampire: ?
Ghoul: Ghosts howl and whirl in a magical necromancy storm's wind, while the remains of long-dead mariners stir in their watery graves. During the storm, ld4 specters, 2d4 ghouls, and 4d6 zombies emerge from the waves to attack the ship.
Zombie: Ghosts howl and whirl in a magical necromancy storm's wind, while the remains of long-dead mariners stir in their watery graves. During the storm, ld4 specters, 2d4 ghouls, and 4d6 zombies emerge from the waves to attack the ship.
Ghost ships are incorporeal vessels that carry undead crews. The crews often died in a grisly manner and have unfinished business that keeps them tethered to the Material Plane.
Shadow: ?
Specter: If a humanoid creature dies in ghost fog, its spirit rises as a specter that is hostile toward all creatures that aren't undead.
Ghosts howl and whirl in a magical necromancy storm's wind, while the remains of long-dead mariners stir in their watery graves. During the storm, ld4 specters, 2d4 ghouls, and 4d6 zombies emerge from the waves to attack the ship.
Ghost ships are incorporeal vessels that carry undead crews. The crews often died in a grisly manner and have unfinished business that keeps them tethered to the Material Plane.
Using a cursed ceremonial dagger the cultists twisted the souls of five missionaries, turning them into one wraith and four specters that haunt the lower deck of the Marshal.
Banshee: ?
Wight: ?
Vampire Spawn: ?
Mummy: ?
Death Knight: ?
Ghast: This deck is a prison for four ghasts-formerly a group of thieves who stowed away in the hold before the Emperor last left port. When the ship was waylaid by the storm, they could not escape from the hold and eventually starved to death.
Minotaur Skeleton: ?
Ogre Zombie: ?
Ghost: Ghost ships are incorporeal vessels that carry undead crews. The crews often died in a grisly manner and have unfinished business that keeps them tethered to the Material Plane.
Wraith: Ghost ships are incorporeal vessels that carry undead crews. The crews often died in a grisly manner and have unfinished business that keeps them tethered to the Material Plane.
Using a cursed ceremonial dagger the cultists twisted the souls of five missionaries, turning them into one wraith and four specters that haunt the lower deck of the Marshal.
Flameskull: ?
Demilich: ?
Lich: ?
 

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