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Undead Origins


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Voadam

Hero
Howls in the Night
2e
Lord Godefroy, Ghost: ?
Ann Campbell, Ghost: ?

Zombie: The zombies are the remnants of a hunting party. Trapped in the shack by the hounds, they eventually died of fear and horror. When their spirits left their bodies, the curse reanimated them and left them here for to attack any intruders.
 
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Voadam

Hero
Night of the Vampire (2e)
2e
Lord Andru Vandevic, Vampire: ?
Lady Natasha Troublicja, Vampire: ?
Lady Laina Vandevic, Minion Vampire: Andru attacks Laina again with the intention of turning her into a vampire bride, and is revealed as the vampire.
Unless the PCs are very lucky, Laina is transformed into a vampire.
Andru returns to Laina's room and transforms her into a minion vampire under his control.

Vampire: Any creature killed by a vampire's energy drain is doomed to rise as a vampire itself 1 day after burial. This can be prevented by burning or destroying the body.
 

Voadam

Hero
PHBR1 The Complete Fighter's Handbook
2e
Ghost Horse: A horse dies while attuned to a Saddle of the Spirit-Horse magic item.
Ghost Donkey: A horse dies while attuned to a variant Saddle of the Spirit-Horse magic item.
Ghost Camel: A horse dies while attuned to a variant Saddle of the Spirit-Horse magic item.
Ghost Ground Animal: A horse dies while attuned to a variant Saddle of the Spirit-Horse magic item.
Frozen Lich: ?

Undead: ?
Mummy: ?
Vampire: ?

Saddle of the Spirit-Horse: This is a very strange magical item which may only be used by warriors (either single-, multi-, or dual-class).
To all appearances, it is an ordinary, worn leather saddle of good quality. However, it is a magical item. If worn by a single horse, it attunes itself to that horse when worn for three days. (It doesn't have to be worn continuously for 72 hours—just worn as an ordinary saddle is.)
Once it is attuned to the horse, nothing remarkable happens . . . unless the horse dies while wearing the saddle. If it does, the spirit of the horse stays with the saddle for another 24 hours. Half an hour after the horse died, the spirit of the horse will "awaken," and climb to its unseen feet, and prepare to carry its master wherever he wants to go. The ghost-horse continues to wear the saddle and to carry it around . . . and the horse's master or other favorite riders may ride it during that time.
For the next 24 hours, the horse-ghost will tirelessly carry its rider wherever he wants to go, at the full running speed the horse could manage when it was alive. But it's a spooky sight: The saddle floats in the air, four or five feet up (at the height the living horse carried it); the rider must mount normally, treat the horse as he did normally, and pretend all is as it ever was.
Other than running, the horse-spirit has no unusual abilities. It cannot be seen or touched. It can whinny and neigh, and it can buck . . . though only the saddle is seen to buck in the air. It cannot truly fly; when it comes to a ravine, for instance, it must descend to the bottom and climb the other slope as it would have had to do if it were alive.
This frightens living horses. No normal horse will approach the animated saddle within a hundred feet. For this reason, it is best used when the character is alone and, has his horse killed out from under him.
If a character kills his horse to get this 24 hours of fast, tireless service, the ghost-horse will remember this and be offended by it . . . even if the character did it secretly, by poison or long-distance magic, the horse will know it. It will allow him to mount the floating saddle, and behave normally for a while, but at some catastrophic time it will try to kill the character. It may jump off a cliff, or ride him straight back at the enemy he's trying to elude, or buck him off into a pit of snakes.
These saddles may also be made for donkeys, camels, or any other ground animals. They don't work with pegasi, griffons, or other flying beasts.
 

Voadam

Hero
PHBR2 Complete Thief's Handbook
2e
Undead: ?
Shadow: Shadowcloak magic item.
Vampire: ?

Shadowcloak: This large, cowled cloak is made from pure black velvet. When worn by a thief it improves hide in shadows chances by 25% and makes a thief 50% likely to be invisible in near-darkness (even to infravision, ultravision, etc.). It can also be used to cast darkness, darkness 15' radius, and continual darkness once each per day (at 12th level of magic use). Finally, once per day the wearer can actually transform into a shadow (cf. Monstrous Compendium I) for up to 12 turns, becoming a shadow in all respects save for mental ones (thus, the wearer cannot be damaged by nonmagical weapons, undead take the wearer for a shadow and ignore him, etc.). Saves against light-based attacks (e.g., a light spell cast into the eyes) are always made at -2 by the wearer of a shadowcloak.
If a cleric successfully makes a turning attempt against the wearer in shadowform, the cloak wearer is permitted a saving throw (this is at -4 if the cleric is actually able to damn/destroy shadows). If the save fails, the wearer suffers 1d6 points of damage per level of the cleric and the shadowcloak is destroyed. If the save is made, the character takes half damage and must flee in fear from the cleric at maximum rate for one turn.
 


Voadam

Hero
PHBR4 The Complete Wizard's Handbook
2e
Undead: ?
Ghost: ?
Ghoul: ?
Mummy: ?
Shadow: If a human or demihuman victim is reduced to 0 hit points or 0 Strength by the caster in shadow form from the shadow form spell, the victim has lost all of his life force and is immediately drawn into the Negative Material Plane where he will forever after exist as a shadow.
Shadow Form spell.
Spectre: ?
Zombie: ?
Ju-ju Zombie: Zombie Double spell.

Shadow Form (Necromancy)
Eighth-Level Spell
Range: 0
Components: V, S, M
Duration: 1 round/level
Casting Time: 1 round
Area of Effect: The caster
Saving Throw: None
By means of this spell, the caster temporarily changes himself into a shadow. The caster gains the movement rate, Armor Class, hit dice, and all abilities of a shadow. His chilling touch (requiring a normal attack roll) inflicts 2-5 (1d4+1) hit points of damage on his victims as well as draining one point of Strength. Lost Strength returns in 2-8 (2d4) turns after being touched. If a human or demihuman victim is reduced to 0 hit points or 0 Strength by the caster in shadow form, the victim has lost all of his life force and is immediately drawn into the Negative Material Plane where he will forever after exist as a shadow.
All of the caster's weapons and equipment stay with him, but he is unable to use them while in shadow form. He is also unable to cast spells while in shadow form, but he is immune to sleep, charm, and hold spells, and is unaffected by cold-based attacks. He is 90 percent undetectable in all but the brightest of surroundings. Unlike normal shadows, a wizard in shadow form cannot be turned by priests. At the end of the spell's duration, there is a 5% chance that the caster will permanently remain as a shadow. Nothing short of a wish can return the caster to his normal form.
The material components for this spell are the shroud from a corpse at least 100 years old and a black glass marble.

Zombie Double (Necromancy)
Seventh-Level Spell
Range: 0
Components: V, S, M
Duration: 1 turn/level
Casting Time: 1 turn
Area of Effect: Special
Saving Throw: None
This spell creates a ju-ju zombie duplicate of the caster. The zombie double has the same memories, consciousness, and alignment as the caster; essentially, the caster now exists in two bodies simultaneously. In all other respects, the zombie double is the same as a normal ju-ju zombie (AC 6; MV 9; HD 3+12; #AT 1; Dmg 3-12; SA strike as a 6 HD monster; SD immune to all mind-affecting spells, including illusions; immune to sleep, charm, hold, death magic, magic missiles, electricity, poisons, and cold-based spells; edged and cleaving weapons inflict normal damage while blunt and piercing weapons inflict half- damage; magical and normal fire inflicts half-damage); THAC0 16.
The zombie double cannot cast spells, but it can use any weapons that the caster can use. It is also able to climb walls as a thief (92 percent). The zombie double can be turned as a spectre. If it strays more than 30 yards from the caster, the zombie double becomes inactive and collapses to the ground; it becomes active again the instant the caster moves within 30 yards.
The material components for this spell are a bit of wax from a black candle and a lock of hair from the caster.
 

Voadam

Hero
Return to the Tomb of Horrors
2e
Bone Weird: It is doubtful that bone weirds are called into existence by mere chance; a wizard or necromancer of powerful ability is most commonly the cause for their appearance.
A strange essence inhabits the cast-off bony dross of this mom, drawn here and shaped by Acererak's ever-busy hands. In his efforts to understand and fully grasp the true nature of the Negative Energy Plane, Acererak's paradigm shifted enough so that he was able to think of the plane as just another elemental plane, albeit an anomalous one. Following this line of reasoning, he was able to coerce the nihilistic essences of the plane into the dead bones within this chamber (with the help of his former servant Deverus). In effect, he brought into being bone weirds-the first of their kind to exist.
Moilian Heart: A moilian heart is an example of a previously undiscovered class of undead creatures created by the dissolution of the lost city of Moil.
The moilian heart is an entirely artificial monster, created by dark necromancy.
The artificial animation of moilian creatures involves a very rare spell researched and codified by the necromancer Drake of the Black Academy, who has discovered the unique undead creatures of Moil, the City That Waits. The moilian heart represents the necromancer’s first essay into this new avenue of the Dark Arts, but certainly not his last.
Drake is investigating many lines of research, but one of his most promising has produced the creature that he keeps safely locked away in this lead-lined vault. This line of research (among others) was actually illuminated to him when he encountered some of the denizens of The City That Waits (of all the necromancers in Skull City, only Drake has secretly penetrated thus far into Acererak's realm).
Animate Moilian spell.
Moilian Zombie: They lie as dead, although they are not marked by violence, as their deaths came to them in dark slumber. Neither is there any rot apparent, due to the supernatural cold which permeates the air in the city of their origin, Moil.
There was once a city called Moil that daily saw the light of the sun. The inhabitants of Moil were a foul people, as evidenced by their worship of the powerful tanar'ri lord called Orcus. With the passage of time the Moilians’ faith in their deity slipped. The tanar’ri lord sought vengeance, and placed a curse upon Moil; its inhabitants fell into an enchanted slumber which would lift only with the dawn. Orcus then removed the city from its natural site and transformed it into a nightmarish demiplane with ties to the Negative Energy Plane, assuring that the sun would never again shine upon Moil. Over time, the slumbering moilians all perished in their dark sleep. Because of their proximity to the Negative Energy Plane, the frozen forms of the inhabitants became undead moilian zombies.
Any character reduced to 0 hit points through a Moilian heart's draining dies and has a 13% chance of spontaneously animating as a Moilian zombie.
Predictably, Orcus was wroth. In horrible but unlooked-for vengeance, the entity cast what initially seemed a mild curse over Moil: its inhabitants fell into an enchanted sleep that could only be broken by the dawning of the sun. Orcus then physically removed the city from its natural site and transformed it into a nightmarish, lightless demiplane of its own, assuring that the sun would never shine upon its tall towers. Having completed this deed, Orcus dubbed the demiplane anew as The City That Waits.
Over time, the slumbering Moilians all perished in their dark sleep, leaving the place strewn with unquiet dead and dangerous dreams.
Animate Moilian spell.
Vestige, Undead Dream: The Vestige is a creature born from the nightmares of every citizen of the city of Moil as they died in cursed sleep.
With the advent of Orcus’s curse of sleep, the strengthened dream consciousness of the city’s citizenry survived beyond the death of their corporeal bodies; thus was born the Vestige.
Predictably, Orcus was wroth. In horrible but unlooked-for vengeance, the entity cast what initially seemed a mild curse over Moil: its inhabitants fell into an enchanted sleep that could only be broken by the dawning of the sun. Orcus then physically removed the city from its natural site and transformed it into a nightmarish, lightless demiplane of its own, assuring that the sun would never shine upon its tall towers. Having completed this deed, Orcus dubbed the demiplane anew as The City That Waits.
Over time, the slumbering Moilians all perished in their dark sleep, leaving the place strewn with unquiet dead and dangerous dreams.
Winter-Wight: Acererak created winter-wights in his quest for knowledge and power.
Acererak creates winter-wights from lower forms of undead in a special process. This process involves the immersion of the undead in a bath of amplified radiation from the Negative Energy Plane, in conjunction with powerful rites of binding and animation.
The blank canister in the chamber is part and parcel of Acererak's researches. Acererak calls the device a Dim Forge, and with it he is able to enervate immensely powerful undead beings such as his most recent invention, the winter-wight (although a specific spell exists to create winter-wights, one of the material components of the spell is a negative-energy focusing device, such as the Dim Forge). While the Dim Forge is a potent tool for undead creation, it is prone to spawn failed experiments. Hundreds of unfavored beings have left the black canister of the forge only to be relegated to the Theater of the Dead.
Although not apparent to the observer, the crystal dome located above the Forge represents the endpoint of an array of magically protected antennas that reach into the Negative Energy Material Plane. The antennas are over a mile long and branch many times. Through a series of complex enchantments, Acererak has created a means of collecting, concentrating, and amplifying negative energy down the length of the antennas so that the crystal blister in the room acts to focus negative energy into the canister.
If the characters inspect the canister, they find only a latch and a pair of heavy-duty hinges that allow the weighty lid to be thrown back. Within the canister, there is a chill space large enough to contain One human-sized creature. Activation of the Dim Forge is automatically accomplished merely by closing the lid, as the PCs may discover-possibly to their dismay-with a minimum of experimentation.
Upon activation of the Dim Forge, the large unseen antennas draw in the essence of the Void. A thrum of magic vibrates through its mile-long length. The characters hear a gonglike thrum. The noise has no more volume than normal conversation during the first round, but quickly builds, reaching a thunderous crescendo three rounds later. At the end of the third round, the blister on the ceiling releases a single bolt of negative energy, so black that it appears to be a rip in the fabric of reality itself. The energy discharges from the ceiling pod into the black canister below. All is silent after the discharge, and nothing moves save for a bit of residual blackfire (as the spell; stand back!) upon the surface of the canister. The flames dissipate in the space of a round.
If a body of any size that can fit (living, dead, or undead) is within the closed Forge at the time of
discharge, consult the table below to determine the result of the concentrated annihilating energy. Even fully empowered undead (such as a winter-wight) can be destroyed by a second exposure to the Forge's energies. If the canister contains an inanimate object or is empty, a negative energy elemental is always generated. If the spell create winter-wight is cast in conjunction with the activation of the Dim Forge, add +2 to the die roll.
If the canister is open when the energy discharge strikes, the bolt fragments and showers the room with sparks of negative energy. Objects in the chamber suffer no ill effects, but creatures must attempt saving throws vs. breath weapon. All who fail suffer the effect noted on the table.
Dim Forge Activation Results (1d8)
1. Not even dust remains within the canister.
2. The object is destroyed and small carbon fragments burn fitfully with blackfire for ld6+6 rounds.
3. Body is burnt almost past recognizability; the smell is truly ghastly.
4. Burnt body animates as a standard zombie; no remnant of personality remains.
5. Body internalizes energy and animates as a standard spectre; no personality remains.
6. Body completely internalizes energy and is destroyed; negative energy elemental is generated and personality is lost.
7. Body internalizes energy and animates as a half-strength winter-wight (8 Hit Dice); original personality is destroyed.
8. Body internalizes energy and animates as a winter-wight; original personality, if any, survives with a successful Wisdom check.
Create Winter-Wight spell.
Acererak Lich: The balor (a true tanar’ri) called Tarnhem is held imprisoned in this chamber through powerful dweomers and Acererak’s knowledge of its truename: Maasgheldur. Acererak discovered the name because it was a requirement of his particular ritual of transformation from cambion to lich-he needed to know his supernatural father. Tarnhem’s ravishment of a human female engendered the half-tanar’ri child whom his mother named Acererak (see Desatysso’s Journal for details).
Acererak Demilich: ?
Blaesing, Vampire: ?
Absalom, Vampire: ?
Harrow, Vampire: ?
Minor Death: ?
Mistress Ferranifer, Vampire Scion Necromancer 18: ?
Gustaeth: Of all the trophies mounted in the Tower of Test, three were infused with the energy of unlife by the Dark Intrusion.
Tyr's Undead Hand: Those who believe the hand to truly be that of Tyr are not disappointed to discover that the hand truly does possess power from beyond the grave-it is animated. Unfortunately, it is animated by the Dark Intrusion.
Faericles, Lord High Exultant, Moilian Zombie: Faericles was the last of the Lord High Exaltants, and his fate was the same as most of the rest of the populace of Moil: he perished in his sleep and became a Moilian zombie. However, Acererak found that he had use for such martial prowess and rejuvenated Faericles to the point where he now remains constantly animated. In the process, Faericles became empowered far beyond “normal” Moilian zombies.
He appears as a leathery-skinned human who is illuminated with an eerie violet glow; this is a side effect of the necromantic energization that allows him permanent animation.
Faericles spends at least 12 hours out of 24 on this mat in contemplation of the mysteries of his art. At the same time, the enchanted stones energize his body so that he can remain animate even without the nourishing presence of living beings. These stones (created by Acererak) emit a necromantic radiation capable of saturating living or once-living objects. This radiation has the effect of linking the saturated being with the Negative Energy Plane. For Faericles, an undead Moilian zombie, it means he can operate indefinitely as long as he gets his regular “fix.”
Acererak Demilich Form: ?
Acererak Skeleton Form: ?
Acererak Winter Wight Form: ?
Undead Statue: The statue in the corner was a human captured and brought to the Fortress of Conclusion by one of the resident tanar’ri. Isafel turned her stony gaze upon the poor fellow, turning him to stone, after which she subjected her new sculpture to the negative energies of the Dim Forge. In this one instant, Isafel knew success; in effect she had created an undead statue.
Winter-Wight Giant Toad: Acererak experimented with nonhumanold forms during his research into the creation of the winter-wight. After some limited success, the spirit of the demilich abandoned these efforts due to his inability to graft sufficient intelligence into the creations for his purposes. Acererak destroyed every one of his mentally dim formulations save for the One that lingers yet in this chamber. In the mood for a bit of novelty, Acererak invested the skeletal structure of a giant toad with a blackfire link to the Negative Energy Plane after the manner of a true winter-wight.

Wight: These wights were spontaneously animated by an outlying finger of the Dark Intrusion. They have been lying dead at the bottom of the river for a week and have only now gained the impetus to rise again.
They took the crew of Payvin’s Pearl with stealth and magic, drained their blood, then dropped the corpses into the concealing waters of the Thelly River. Payvin is alive only because they were just leaving as he came aboard, and it amused them to terrorize him. The bodies of the crew remained beneath the river for a week (a vampire's victims must be buried to become vampires themselves) before another surge of Negative Energy spontaneously animated them into evil wights.
Again, it is the Dim Triad who has been causing the deaths and disappearances in Pitchfield. The vampires do not return for many nights. However, on the second night after the PCs' arrival, a strange fog flows in from the river and the buried dead of the town's cemetery begin to animate in the night. Since the Dim Triad extracted blood for Mistress Ferranifer's necromantic experiments rather than merely drinking it themselves, their victims do not become vampires in turn but merely wights.
Vampire: A vampire's victims must be buried to become vampires themselves.
Ghast: ?
Skeleton: The skeletal remains here have been infused with unlife by seepage from the Negative Energy Plane that surrounds the Fortress of Conclusion.
Zombie: Any living creature of rat size or larger that is slain in the Tomb of Horrors has a 60% chance of spontaneously animating within 1d6 rounds as an undead zombie with the same Hit Dice as the original creature.
Any living creature of rat size or larger that is slain in The City That Waits has an 80% chance of spontaneously animating within 1d3 rounds as an undead zombie with the same Hit Dice as the original creature.
Any freshly slain living creature of rat size or larger that is slain in The Fortress of Conclusion has a 95% chance of spontaneously animating as a zombie of the same HD as the original creature. Naturally this applies to PCs who perish in combat or any of Acererak's fiendish traps. The animation takes 1 round.
The blank canister in the chamber is part and parcel of Acererak's researches. Acererak calls the device a Dim Forge, and with it he is able to enervate immensely powerful undead beings such as his most recent invention, the winter-wight (although a specific spell exists to create winter-wights, one of the material components of the spell is a negative-energy focusing device, such as the Dim Forge). While the Dim Forge is a potent tool for undead creation, it is prone to spawn failed experiments. Hundreds of unfavored beings have left the black canister of the forge only to be relegated to the Theater of the Dead.
Although not apparent to the observer, the crystal dome located above the Forge represents the endpoint of an array of magically protected antennas that reach into the Negative Energy Material Plane. The antennas are over a mile long and branch many times. Through a series of complex enchantments, Acererak has created a means of collecting, concentrating, and amplifying negative energy down the length of the antennas so that the crystal blister in the room acts to focus negative energy into the canister.
If the characters inspect the canister, they find only a latch and a pair of heavy-duty hinges that allow the weighty lid to be thrown back. Within the canister, there is a chill space large enough to contain One human-sized creature. Activation of the Dim Forge is automatically accomplished merely by closing the lid, as the PCs may discover-possibly to their dismay-with a minimum of experimentation.
Upon activation of the Dim Forge, the large unseen antennas draw in the essence of the Void. A thrum of magic vibrates through its mile-long length. The characters hear a gonglike thrum. The noise has no more volume than normal conversation during the first round, but quickly builds, reaching a thunderous crescendo three rounds later. At the end of the third round, the blister on the ceiling releases a single bolt of negative energy, so black that it appears to be a rip in the fabric of reality itself. The energy discharges from the ceiling pod into the black canister below. All is silent after the discharge, and nothing moves save for a bit of residual blackfire (as the spell; stand back!) upon the surface of the canister. The flames dissipate in the space of a round.
If a body of any size that can fit (living, dead, or undead) is within the closed Forge at the time of
discharge, consult the table below to determine the result of the concentrated annihilating energy. Even fully empowered undead (such as a winter-wight) can be destroyed by a second exposure to the Forge's energies. If the canister contains an inanimate object or is empty, a negative energy elemental is always generated. If the spell create winter-wight is cast in conjunction with the activation of the Dim Forge, add +2 to the die roll.
If the canister is open when the energy discharge strikes, the bolt fragments and showers the room with sparks of negative energy. Objects in the chamber suffer no ill effects, but creatures must attempt saving throws vs. breath weapon. All who fail suffer the effect noted on the table.
Dim Forge Activation Results (1d8)
1. Not even dust remains within the canister.
2. The object is destroyed and small carbon fragments burn fitfully with blackfire for ld6+6 rounds.
3. Body is burnt almost past recognizability; the smell is truly ghastly.
4. Burnt body animates as a standard zombie; no remnant of personality remains.
5. Body internalizes energy and animates as a standard spectre; no personality remains.
6. Body completely internalizes energy and is destroyed; negative energy elemental is generated and personality is lost.
7. Body internalizes energy and animates as a half-strength winter-wight (8 Hit Dice); original personality is destroyed.
8. Body internalizes energy and animates as a winter-wight; original personality, if any, survives with a successful Wisdom check.
Bone Naga: ?
Undead: “As part of the enchantment of their creation, undead 'siphon' a bit of the energy flowing toward the Negative Energy Plane. This 'stolen' energy serves as their energy of animation. More powerful types of undead have a stronger connection to the Negative Energy Plane and are therefore able to siphon even more energy for their own purposes before it is forever lost in the Final Void. This type of animation is known as "necromancy," but it could also be called Entropic Animancy. Other forms of enchantments exist that can link objects or corpses to the Positive Energy Plane; in this case the flow of energy is reversed. Undead linked to the Positive Energy Plane continually radiate energy and are able to siphon a bit of that energy for purposes of animation. Undead of this type often are associated with the control over living tissue, such as mummies. More powerful undead linked with the Positive Energy Plane are able to manipulate these energies with specific purposes and effects. This type of enchantment is sometimes known as Positive Animancy.”
Predictably, Orcus was wroth. In horrible but unlooked-for vengeance, the entity cast what initially seemed a mild curse over Moil: its inhabitants fell into an enchanted sleep that could only be broken by the dawning of the sun. Orcus then physically removed the city from its natural site and transformed it into a nightmarish, lightless demiplane of its own, assuring that the sun would never shine upon its tall towers. Having completed this deed, Orcus dubbed the demiplane anew as The City That Waits.
Over time, the slumbering Moilians all perished in their dark sleep, leaving the place strewn with unquiet dead and dangerous dreams.
These stones (created by Acererak) emit a necromantic radiation capable of saturating living or once-living objects. This radiation has the effect of linking the saturated being with the Negative Energy Plane. For Faericles, an undead Moilian zombie, it means he can operate indefinitely as long as he gets his regular “fix.”
For a living being the radiation from the stones causes a sharp pain after one round’ s exposure. An unaccountable feeling of dread also surfaces, along with a desire to move out of the glow of the stones.
An actual link to the Negative Energy Plane is forged at the end of the second round. At this point, the life force of the affected being is drawn forth in one continuous discharge, killing the being and transforming him or her into a free-willed undead in one turn. The newly formed undead retains the Hit Dice and hit points that he or she had upon “death,” as well as skills, proficiencies, spells, and class abilities (except for paladins, who lose all associated class abilities and become undead fighters).
Flameskull: ?
Wraith-Spider: Victims drained of all Constitution from a wraith-spider's venom die and have a 100% chance (here in the City) of coming back within 24 hours as wraith-spiders with humanoid heads.
Nightwalker: These creatures seem to embody the principle of destructive entropy inherent in the Negative Energy Plane.
Spectre: The blank canister in the chamber is part and parcel of Acererak's researches. Acererak calls the device a Dim Forge, and with it he is able to enervate immensely powerful undead beings such as his most recent invention, the winter-wight (although a specific spell exists to create winter-wights, one of the material components of the spell is a negative-energy focusing device, such as the Dim Forge). While the Dim Forge is a potent tool for undead creation, it is prone to spawn failed experiments. Hundreds of unfavored beings have left the black canister of the forge only to be relegated to the Theater of the Dead.
Although not apparent to the observer, the crystal dome located above the Forge represents the endpoint of an array of magically protected antennas that reach into the Negative Energy Material Plane. The antennas are over a mile long and branch many times. Through a series of complex enchantments, Acererak has created a means of collecting, concentrating, and amplifying negative energy down the length of the antennas so that the crystal blister in the room acts to focus negative energy into the canister.
If the characters inspect the canister, they find only a latch and a pair of heavy-duty hinges that allow the weighty lid to be thrown back. Within the canister, there is a chill space large enough to contain One human-sized creature. Activation of the Dim Forge is automatically accomplished merely by closing the lid, as the PCs may discover-possibly to their dismay-with a minimum of experimentation.
Upon activation of the Dim Forge, the large unseen antennas draw in the essence of the Void. A thrum of magic vibrates through its mile-long length. The characters hear a gonglike thrum. The noise has no more volume than normal conversation during the first round, but quickly builds, reaching a thunderous crescendo three rounds later. At the end of the third round, the blister on the ceiling releases a single bolt of negative energy, so black that it appears to be a rip in the fabric of reality itself. The energy discharges from the ceiling pod into the black canister below. All is silent after the discharge, and nothing moves save for a bit of residual blackfire (as the spell; stand back!) upon the surface of the canister. The flames dissipate in the space of a round.
If a body of any size that can fit (living, dead, or undead) is within the closed Forge at the time of
discharge, consult the table below to determine the result of the concentrated annihilating energy. Even fully empowered undead (such as a winter-wight) can be destroyed by a second exposure to the Forge's energies. If the canister contains an inanimate object or is empty, a negative energy elemental is always generated. If the spell create winter-wight is cast in conjunction with the activation of the Dim Forge, add +2 to the die roll.
If the canister is open when the energy discharge strikes, the bolt fragments and showers the room with sparks of negative energy. Objects in the chamber suffer no ill effects, but creatures must attempt saving throws vs. breath weapon. All who fail suffer the effect noted on the table.
Dim Forge Activation Results (1d8)
1. Not even dust remains within the canister.
2. The object is destroyed and small carbon fragments burn fitfully with blackfire for ld6+6 rounds.
3. Body is burnt almost past recognizability; the smell is truly ghastly.
4. Burnt body animates as a standard zombie; no remnant of personality remains.
5. Body internalizes energy and animates as a standard spectre; no personality remains.
6. Body completely internalizes energy and is destroyed; negative energy elemental is generated and personality is lost.
7. Body internalizes energy and animates as a half-strength winter-wight (8 Hit Dice); original personality is destroyed.
8. Body internalizes energy and animates as a winter-wight; original personality, if any, survives with a successful Wisdom check.

Animate Moilian
(Necromancy)
Level: 8
Range: 10 yds. Components V, S, M Duration: Pemranent Casting Time: 8 rounds
Area of Efffect 1 body or body part Saving Throw: None
This incantation allow the caster to animate bones, body fragments, or complete bodies of dead
humanoids of up to human size. Creature created in this way are referred to as Moilian (after Moil, the city because of their origin), rather than simply undead. This is because their energy of animation does not come from the Negative Energy Plane but rather from the life energies of living creatures nearby. Examples of creatures created by this spell include the Moilian heart and the Moilian zombie.
Moilians created by this spell obey simple verbal commands from the caster. Mobile Moilians can follow the caster, remain in an area to attack any intruders, and perform other uncomplicated tasks.
This spell only animates a single corpse or body part with each casting. Regardless of the caster’s level, the Moilian created has 3 Hit Dice if a body part or 6 Hit Dice if it is a full body. The magic cannot be dispelled, but creatures created can be turned at the appropriate Hit Dice.
The material components required are the body or body part, a drop of blood, a pinch of bone powder, and the perspiration of fear. Only evil beings would consider using this spell.

Create Winter-wight
(Necromancy) (Reversible)
Level 9 Range 10 yds. Components V, S, M
Duration: Permanent Casting Time: 1 round
Area of Effect: 1 body Saving Throw: None
This spell turns a properly prepared body into a winter-wight. Preparation of the body requires many days, though the spell itself can be cast on the prepared body in only a single round. Create
winter-wight can only be cast in conjunction with unique devices (such as the Dim Forge) capable of focusing and concentrating Negative Energy into a skeleton as part of the preparation step. Even with the use of this spell with the proper Negative Energy focusing devices, the spell is only effective 1% to 10% (1d10) of the time. Failures range between mere dust to warped, fragmented undead of little mobility and wit.
Once properly animated, the winter-wight obeys the commands of its creator. The personality of the
created creature may vary widely but is certain to combine calculating intelligence with cold cruelty, unless animal bones are used in the process (in which case little intelligence can be found in the final deadly undead construct).
Once animated, the winter-wight remains active until physically destroyed. Destruction is also possible if the undead creature is subject to the reverse of this spell, destroy winter-wight, that utterly annihilates any single winter-wight that fails its saving throw vs. death magic.

1e
Demi-Lich, Acererak: Eventually even the undead life force of Acererak began to wane, so for the next 8 decades, the lich's servants labored to create the Tomb of Horrors. Then Acererak destroyed all of his slaves and servitors, magically hid the entrance to his halls, and went to his final haunt, while his soul roamed strange planes unknown to even the wisest of sages.
Animated Skeleton of a Giant: ?
Magically-Prepared Zombie: Magically-prepared zombie with spells upon him.
Lich, Acererak: Ages past, a human magic-user/cleric of surpassing evil took the steps necessary to preserve his life force beyond the centuries he had already lived, and this creature became the lich, Acererak.

Mummy: Inside this sarcophagus are the parts of a mummy (not an undead, exactly, for at this time it is the mummified remains of a human) with wrappings partially undone and tattered, and a huge amethyst just barely visible between the wrappings covering the head. This 5,000 g.p. Gem has an evil magic placed upon it, and if it is removed from the eyesocket the remains become a true mummy.
Ghost: All that remains now of Acererak are the dust of his bones and his skull resting in the far recesses of the vault. This bit is enough! If the treasure in the crypt is touched the dust swirls into the air and forms a man-like shape. If this shape is ignored, it will dissipate in 3 rounds, for it can only advance and threaten, not harm. Any physical attack will give it 1 factor of energy, however, and spell attacks give it 1 energy factor for every level of the spell used, i.e., a 3rd level spell bestows 3 energy factors. Each factor is equal to a hit point, and if 50 energy factors are gained, the dust will form into a ghost controlled by Acererak.
 
Last edited:

Voadam

Hero
RR1 Darklords
2e
Anhktepot, Lord of Har'Akir, Greater Mummy: Pharaoh Anhktepot ruled centuries ago in the great desert land of Har'Akir. The pharaoh, like most of his culture, was obsessed with death. The religion of the people revolved around death, and the pharaoh was the link between men and the gods. Anhktepot himself was a priest of Ra, the sun god.
Anhktepot commanded his priests to find a way for him to live forever. Many slaves and prisoners died horribly as subjects in Anhktepot's gruesome experiments. Totally frustrated with the lack of success, the pharaoh had several temples burned and razed. He stalked into the Kharn temple, greatest of all in Har'Akir, and cursed the gods for not granting him his heart's desire. Ra, sun god and patron of the pharaohs, answered Anhktepot. He told the pharaoh that he would live even after death, though he might wish otherwise. Ra did not elaborate.
Anhktepot left the temple elated but confused. He still did not know how to cheat death. That night, everyone he touched died. His wife, several servants, and his eldest child—all were dead. According to custom, they were mummified and entombed in great buildings in the desert.
One day the priests rebelled against the pharaoh and murdered him in his sleep. The funeral lasted for a month. During it, Anhktepot was awake and helpless, trapped inside his own corpse. His mind screamed as they mummified his body. He was nearly insane when they entombed him.
As the sun set, and Ra's power waned, the borders of Ravenloft seeped into the desert kingdom to steal away the tomb of Anhktepot and the nearby small village of Mudar.
Strahd: ?
Nephyr, Greater Mummy: Pharaoh Anhktepot ruled centuries ago in the great desert land of Har'Akir. The pharaoh, like most of his culture, was obsessed with death. The religion of the people revolved around death, and the pharaoh was the link between men and the gods. Anhktepot himself was a priest of Ra, the sun god.
Anhktepot commanded his priests to find a way for him to live forever. Many slaves and prisoners died horribly as subjects in Anhktepot's gruesome experiments. Totally frustrated with the lack of success, the pharaoh had several temples burned and razed. He stalked into the Kharn temple, greatest of all in Har'Akir, and cursed the gods for not granting him his heart's desire. Ra, sun god and patron of the pharaohs, answered Anhktepot. He told the pharaoh that he would live even after death, though he might wish otherwise. Ra did not elaborate.
Anhktepot left the temple elated but confused. He still did not know how to cheat death. That night, everyone he touched died. His wife, several servants, and his eldest child—all were dead. According to custom, they were mummified and entombed in great buildings in the desert.
Soon the great pharaoh came to understand his curse. So long as Ra shone upon him, he was safe. But once he was no longer under the sun's watchful eye, whomever he touched died horribly.
Shortly after the final ceremony of his wife's funeral, Anhktepot was visited in the night. A mummy wrapped in funeral linens entered his chambers. By the vestments he knew it was Nephyr.
The Banshee, Tristessa, Lord of Keening: Nearly all banshees were evil elves in life, but Tristessa was not born of an ordinary clan. She was a drow—a dark elf who lived underground with the rest of her black-hearted kind.
Sages in Darkon say that a party of Arak's drow arose from the dark kingdom one night, dragging Tristessa and her child along with them. Arak's surface was then lush and green. That night, the sky was cold and clear, and the blades of grass shone like silver in the moon's light. Tristessa's captors staked her to the ground, and laid her child beside her. Then they abandoned the pair.
Morning broke. As the sun climbed high in the sky, screams echoed across the landscape—screams so shrill that even the drow below could hear them. Tristessa and her infant could not survive the harsh rays. Mother and child dissolved into the wind, which rose, howling fiercely, and destroyed all life upon Arak's soil. The storm moved west, enveloping a nearby town with its fury. Then the town and storm disappeared, and Keening was formed.
The Beggar Woman, Unique Wight: She is undead, held here only by the strange bonds of Ravenloft.
The Beekeeper, Zombie: ?
Keening Crawling Claw: ?
Skeletal Rat: ?
Rotting Rat: ?
Lady Kateri Shadowborn, Geist: ?
Headless Horseman: Nearly every domain haunted by the Headless Horseman knows a different tale of his origin. In Falkovnia, some say the spirit was a victim of Drakov's men, wrongfully beheaded. In Barovia, they say he sliced off his own head rather than fall prey to one of Strahd's minions, who later gave the head to Strahd.
In Borca, folk have the most specific tale, which they are sure is most true. Borcans say the Horseman was once a bard who had the misfortune of meeting Ivana Boritsi, the lord of Borca. Ivana invited him to her private baths (an offer he could not refuse). Unfortunately, she was in a fickle mood, and he was unable to entertain her. Inspired by the sickle shape of the moon, she had him beheaded, continuing her bath in his blood.
The headless body, as the story continues, was cast into the river near Levkarest. (As to what Ivana did with the head, no one is sure.) The corpse floated downstream until it neared the road to Sturben, where it became lodged beneath a bridge. On the night of the next sickle moon, the body arose.
Heads: They are what became of the horseman's victims.
Medusa Head: ?
Maedar Head: ?
House of Lament: Perhaps Mara's spirit became one with the house, evolving from the tormented to the tormenter, until every timber and stone in the structure was the embodiment of evil. Or perhaps Mara still exists in the walls, alone and full of sorrow, and the house, wanting to comfort her, encourages the living to join her.
For in many lands it is understood that only the warm blood and flesh of the living can ease the cold misery of the dead.
The House of Lament is an entity of evil, of which the spirit that was Mara is only a part. How this came to be is not fully understood, yet some sages would say that the site was always a gathering point of malignancy and evil, even when Dranzorg first built his castle there. Then the malignancy only served to influence the mood of those within it. Mara's absorption was the catalyst that enabled it to grow.
Mara: When dawn's first light was on the horizon, Dranzorg released Mara from her prison. His men brought her to his chambers. "Did you know," he asked, "that an offering must be made to the gods to fortify a keep?" It was a custom in those lands to entomb a cat or a stag in the walls of a castle as it was built, in order to strengthen it and bring good fortune. Mara knew well of this custom. She did not answer, suspecting what Lord Dranzorg had in mind.
As Dranzorg watched, his henchmen dragged Mara to the base of the tower, where the wall had been thickened on the inside. A small alcove with a bench lay open, cut back into the old wall, the opening flush with the new.
Bravely, Mara cursed Dranzorg and his men, and proclaimed that her father would see her death avenged. Dranzorg was amused. He ordered that her finger be pricked with a sedative, so that she would not disturb the work to come. When she collapsed, his men placed her limp body on the bench in the alcove, and proceeded to seal the wall. Mara was entombed alive.
By nightfall, her screams sounded throughout the castle. They continued through the night, and on through the days and nights to come. Each day, the men of the castle complained to Dranzorg, saying they could not
bear the unholy noise, for surely the woman should have died in less than a day. Finally Dranzorg agreed. He personally opened the tomb. The screams subsided. No one lay within.
Baron Urik Von Kharkov, Nosferatu Vampire: Ulrik burned with hatred over the humiliation of being turned into an animal by Morphayus. It was in this frame of mind that he entered Darkon. There, an impoverished bard told Ulrik tales of the Kargat vampires. Lured by thoughts of immortality and dark power, Ulrik traveled to the city of Karg and sought out a vampire. Ulrik's dream of untold power and eternal life soon turned to ashes in his mouth. True, he became a vampire, but as an undead slave to his vampire master. Ulrik won immortality at the expense of his precious humanity.
Merilee Markuza: As the brigands were about to depart, one of them spotted the young girl. In terror, she turned and fled. Her tiny feet had not carried her a dozen yards before a pair of crossbow bolts brought her down. Certain that she was dead, the criminals collected the last of their spoils and rode off.
Some time later, as the last of the child's vital energies were draining away, a dark figure came upon the wounded girl. The mysterious shadow seemed to move quickly over the scene of the murders, taking care to note something here or there. Merilee was too weak to call out for help, but managed a moan of pain. The stranger flashed to the side of the girl with supernatural speed.
Over the course of the next few days, Merilee was to learn much about her "rescuer." The mysterious figure was a tall, slender woman named Keesla. Many years before, Keesla had become a vampire. When she found Merilee, the woman knew that there was no earthly way to save the girl's life. Seeing in the innocent child a striking resemblance to her own daughter who had died decades earlier, she decided that Merilee would not die. Bending over the wounded girl, Keesla began the process that would eventually transform Merilee into a vampire.
Keesla, Vampire: ?
Tiyet, Mummy, Lord of Sebua: People of the Black Land believed that death was only a journey to another existence. In the afterlife, all would remain essentially as it had been before, provided one had been good and kind, provided one's heart had been true.
This is the story of a woman for whom that cycle held no comfort. Because her heart had been fouled with misdeeds, she knew that only horrors would await her. Terrified of judgment, she sacrificed life and spirit to avoid it. In the end, she only condemned herself to a fate that was far worse. She became one of the living dead, a mummy whose beauty is everlasting, but whose heart and hope are lost forever.
Tiyet returned to the temple and sought out Zordenahkt. She begged him to kill her, and perform the ceremony that would save her from terror in the Hall of Judgment. When Zordenahkt refused, she drew a dagger from her gown. Begging for the mercy of the god Apophis, she plunged the dagger into her chest.
Deep within the temple, Zordenahkt performed the ceremony that she had desired. He bathed Tiyet's body in the precious oils of a nobleman's embalmer, reciting a common spell to preserve her beauty. Then he made an incision in her chest, and removed her heart.
The idol of Apophis looked on, as it had looked on each day Tiyet and Zordenahkt met in his temple. It was a great, black serpent, made from cedarwood. Inlaid jewels and black glass served as its scales. Two rubies set in onyx were its eyes.
Zordenahkt placed Tiyet's heart in a stone jar filled with oils. He placed the jar before his serpent god. The words he spoke offered Tiyet's heart in return for her safety from torment in the Underworld. Then he wrapped Tiyet's body in linen, and carried it to his own family tomb. There he poisoned himself with the venom of an asp, and laid down beside her to die.
Tiyet rose the next night. She pulled the strips from her eyes, and saw the body of Zordenahkt beside her. Still wrapped in the linen swaddling of the dead, she crossed the desert and went to the estate of Khamose. Each heart within the house was audible to her, beating with a maddening pace. Loudest was the heart of Khamose, sounding like a drum, compelling her to seek it out.
Tiyet stole into his room, silent as a shadow. She placed her hand upon his chest, and found that the heartbeat slowed. Khamose stirred, and his eyes opened wide. His mouth gaped, but before he could scream, Tiyet paralyzed him with her gaze. Then, even as he lived, she reached through his chest and drew out his heart. Tiyet placed the bloody mass to her red lips and swallowed it. The audible beating of the other hearts in the household stopped; satiated, she could hear them no longer.
Tiyet returned to the tomb and lay down beside the still body of Zordenahkt. When she awoke, she was alone. She had become the lord of Sebua, a domain in Ravenloft.

Banshee: Nearly all banshees were evil elves in life.
Ghost: Ghosts of others the banshee has met on the mountain haunt the places of their demise.
Undead: ?
Greater Mummy: Pharaoh Anhktepot ruled centuries ago in the great desert land of Har'Akir. The pharaoh, like most of his culture, was obsessed with death. The religion of the people revolved around death, and the pharaoh was the link between men and the gods. Anhktepot himself was a priest of Ra, the sun god.
Anhktepot commanded his priests to find a way for him to live forever. Many slaves and prisoners died horribly as subjects in Anhktepot's gruesome experiments. Totally frustrated with the lack of success, the pharaoh had several temples burned and razed. He stalked into the Kharn temple, greatest of all in Har'Akir, and cursed the gods for not granting him his heart's desire. Ra, sun god and patron of the pharaohs, answered Anhktepot. He told the pharaoh that he would live even after death, though he might wish otherwise. Ra did not elaborate.
Anhktepot left the temple elated but confused. He still did not know how to cheat death. That night, everyone he touched died. His wife, several servants, and his eldest child—all were dead. According to custom, they were mummified and entombed in great buildings in the desert.
Soon the great pharaoh came to understand his curse. So long as Ra shone upon him, he was safe. But once he was no longer under the sun's watchful eye, whomever he touched died horribly.
Shortly after the final ceremony of his wife's funeral, Anhktepot was visited in the night. A mummy wrapped in funeral linens entered his chambers. By the vestments he knew it was Nephyr. He fled from her down the long halls of the palace. Finally she cornered him. Unable to talk, the mummy Nephyr tried to embrace Anhktepot. Horrified, he screamed for her to leave him forever. She turned and left. Nephyr walked into the desert and was never seen again. Her tomb remained open and empty.
Anhktepot was also visited by the mummified bodies of the others whom he had killed. He came to understand that he controlled them utterly. They did his every bidding. He used their strength and his own touch of death to tighten the reigns of his evil power over Har'Akir.
He killed many of the kingdom's priests, making them his undead slaves.
Any character who is mummified alive while infected by Anhktepot's rotting disease becomes a greater mummy under the control of Anhktepot.
Mummy: Any character who is mummified alive while infected by Anhktepot's rotting disease becomes a greater mummy under the control of Anhktepot. If you don't have the RAVENLOFT Monstrous Compendium appendix, just make his minions regular mummies.
Tiyet sometimes creates new mummies, using the bodies of her victims. Death alone does not create them; she must mummify them in the common manner. At her disposal are the vats and supplies in an embalmer's house, which lies on the outskirts of Anhalla.
Zombie: The phantom can also animate the dead, who will claw their way out of the earth to grasp the ankles of passersby, and then slowly rise up to attack, like common zombies.
Wight: ?
Spectre: ?
Nosferatu Vampire: Anyone who dies from being drained by Baron von Kharkov becomes a nosferatu vampire.
 

Voadam

Hero
RR2 Book of Crypts
Vampire Nosferatu Fighter 6, Dante Lysin: During one midnight battle, a nosferatu drained Dante dry and he died. Shortly after, Dante’s slayer was killed, but not before Dante fell under the vampiric curse.
Dara, Ghost: One year ago, Baggs decided to grow alfalfa on several acres of unused land to compete with the farm at Location 8. The girl was hired to tend the alfalfa and chase away birds in the fields. As harvest time approached, she was killed when the Malar worshiper set the field on fire. Her charred body lies in the prairie grasses, and her ghost now haunts the field.
“I am Dara, and I was killed,” the ghost wails in hauntingly beautiful tones that waft over the barren field. “I was killed by an evil man who sought to ruin this field. Alfalfa and a dark god filled his life, and for that I was killed. I now search for my murderer so that I can rest.”
Nightblood, Kael Norbin of Thay, Lich 20: When the local villagers began to hunt him down, Kael decided to become a lich and join his love in death.
The night that he carried out this plan, the mists rolled in.

Zombie Common: ?
 

Voadam

Hero
RR4 Islands of Terror
2e
Torrence Bleysmith: Count Rupert Bleysmith declared war on the neighboring duchy of Avergne, a land of infidels and heathens. He called upon his children and his retainers to gather together the army. He traveled the country searching for support among the other nobles. He left Sir August in charge of affairs while he was away.
Torrence, enraged at this perceived slight to himself, cast about wrathfully for some means of exacting revenge on his father and his elder brother. At last, he settled on a plan that would allow him to soothe his wounded pride. He began to sell the secrets of Staunton Bluffs to Commander Pierre Willis of the Avergnites in the hope that they would slay August during a raid.
August, however, was as adept at evading the traps as Torrence was, and it soon became clear to Torrence that he would have to personally oversee the murder of August. Even when he passed along the castle plans for the Avergnite assassins, they blundered and failed miserably.
Meanwhile, Torrence hid his feelings about August's superiority remarkably well and acted as August's chief advisor. August came to trust his brother in all things, seeing that Torrence had matured far more fully than he believed possible.
Eventually, Torrence arranged for the Avergnites to raid along the Staunton border, knowing that August had no choice but to personally repel the marauders. He suggested the best battle plans to his older brother, who agreed to follow them faithfully. That night, Torrence sent a dispatch to Willis telling him of his brother's location and how the Avergnites could best remove him from this position.
That next morning, August and some of Staunton's finest men rode straight into the Avergnite ambush. They hardly had a chance to draw their swords before they went down under a hail of arrows. Their blood spilled into the earth, turning it into a pasty, red mud. The Avergnites were heady with their victory over the hated Sir August Bleysmith. They rode even farther into Staunton, burning and pillaging everything in sight, contrary to the agreement with Torrence.
Torrence, aghast at their duplicity, attempted to turn back the tide of invaders, but it was too late. The Avergnites overran all the Stauntonian positions, slaughtering all the citizens they came upon. Willis and his men eventually arrived at the Bleysmith Estate and laid siege to Castle Stonecrest. Since Torrence had stupidly provided the maps of the castle, it fell easily to the invaders. So did the Bleysmith family, nearly alone in their estate, abandoned by most of their retainers.
Only Torrence escaped, hiding in the privy until the besiegers had gone. When he emerged, smeared with filth, he discovered the looted house in ruins around him. The defiled bodies of his family lay strewn about the estate like broken dolls. At the sight of his ancestral home violated like some commoner's house, Torrence broke down in a fit of grief, rage, and guilt. Had August survived the attack, the Avergnites would never have been able to advance this far. Torrence knew he would have to live with the knowledge that he had caused the downfall of Staunton Bluffs and the death of his family.
He retreated to the forests of Staunton to plot his revenge and vent his grief. He hoped to atone for his mistake by avenging the destruction of his family. Since he had studied some magic when he was younger, he was familiar with certain blasphemous rituals that would enable him to channel his anger. In his pride and wrath, he did not pause to consider the implications of his intended course.
At midnight of the fall equinox, the last Bleysmith began his sacrilege. With great workings of magic and dark promises, Torrence laid a massive spell on the surviving inhabitants of Staunton.
When the citizens arose the next misty morning, they felt compelled to take up whatever weapons they had available. En masse, they marched on the army of Avergne. Bleysmith, full of vanity, watched his makeshift army surprise the force of Avergnites. Torrence had been sure that his people could crush the army, since there were so many more of them and they had the advantage of surprise.
However, the Avergnites recovered from their initial shock much more quickly than anyone could have suspected. They slaughtered the subservient Stauntonians. The earth ran with the blood of guiltless citizens, the cries of the innocents echoing weirdly through the fog.
By now, half-crazed with shame and remorse, Sir Torrence Bleysmith hanged himself in the burnt shell of Castle Stonecrest. His dying thoughts were of revenge, hatred, and guilt. As his life faded from existence, so did the surrounding area.
The restfulness of natural death did not claim Torrence Bleysmith, however, for Ravenloft had other plans for him. His past, tainted as it was with pride, treachery, and disregard for human life, earned him a place in the demiplane.
Weeks after he hanged himself, flashes of reality and memory interrupted the utter blackness of oblivion in which Torrence dwelt. These glimmers grew longer and longer until at last they melded completely into a gray-washed, horrifying reality. His worst nightmares became his reality.
Sir Torrence Bleysmith had become a ghost, doomed to wander the halls of his castle and the woodlands of his domain. His rage and treachery combined with other darker forces to bring him back to a terrible unlife. He would see all that he once held sacred torn away and destroyed.

Skeleton: This was the main forge for the county of Staunton, the finest for miles. It contains those things common to a smithy including two anvils, hammers, trenches, and a good supply of iron. There are some finely crafted blades lying in the soot, held firm in the death grasp of the smith and his apprentices. If anyone tries to take the swords, the smith and his helpers return from the peace of the grave to defend their best work.
Ghast: The guards are the incorporeal forms of the few soldiers who remained loyal to him after his treacherous betrayal of his own countrymen.
Ghoul: ?
Zombie: The most dangerous prisoners were housed in these cells where the jailers could catch their mischief more quickly. Each of these cells contains a zombie wandering about constantly.
Spectre: The spirits of the Bleysmith family float through this room in a stately, eternal dance.
Skeleton Horse: ?
Zombie Sea: Sea zombies, also known as drowned ones, are the animated corpses of humans who died at sea. Although similar to land-dwelling zombies, they are free-willed and are rumored to be animated by the very forces that hold Ravenloft together.
 

Voadam

Hero
Ruined Kingdoms
2e
Raja al-Sadiq Abdul-Tisan, The Audacious Thunderer, Breaker of the Forbidden Seal, The First to be Summoned, Lich 15th Level Human Wizard Sha'ir: Months later, her task complete, Tisan was glad she had expended the effort to experiment with Raja. Of course, Tisan had made some minor mistakes and the sha'ir had to be slain a few more times than strictly necessary, but in the end Tisan still considered her research a complete success.
Adil, Revenant: The unfortunate bearer of the seal is seemingly cursed. He cannot lose the seal or give it away, for it magically returns to his person the moment he ceases to concentrate upon it. Furthermore, if at any time Adil is slain, the seal resurrects him as many times as he has points of Constitution. Thereafter, Adil becomes a revenant or any other form of undead the DM finds appropriate.
Adil, Undead: The unfortunate bearer of the seal is seemingly cursed. He cannot lose the seal or give it away, for it magically returns to his person the moment he ceases to concentrate upon it. Furthermore, if at any time Adil is slain, the seal resurrects him as many times as he has points of Constitution. Thereafter, Adil becomes a revenant or any other form of undead the DM finds appropriate.

Zombie: Not to be left shorthanded, after the battle was over and the flesh of vanquished enemies devoured, Anaiz animated the human forms of the slain segarrans, turning them into guardians of the main entrance and outer temple ward.
 


Voadam

Hero
Servants of Darkness
2e
Goblin Vampire: This ring of regeneration once belonged to the hags, but it was lost when an unusually brave goblin sneaked into their cottage and stole it. In order to punish the thief, the hags put a curse on their treasure.
Goblin vampires are created only by the unique curse placed on items stolen from the Three Sisters of Tepest. Anyone who carries the item gradually becomes a goblin vampire. The transformation takes twenty hours to complete. If the item is discarded before the change is concluded, the character stops changing. He does not, however, revert to normal.
Aroun, Geist: He suffered a fatal stab wound to the heart, but the trauma of his death has tied him to the world of the living.
Umbra: The umbra are undead shadow elves that dwell in the domain of Keening. Their devotion to Tristessa was so great in life that they continue to serve her long after death.
Wraith-Spider: ?
Dark Lord of Keening, Tristessa, Banshee: Tristessa was a powerful shadow elf priestess of Lloth in the now-lost domain of Arak. She was staked out above the surface with her newborn baby by Prince Loht for leading this outlawed religion. Exposure to the sun killed both mother and child, but Tristessa’s spirit was absorbed into the Mists, and the dark powers granted her the small, domain of Keening.
 

Voadam

Hero
Spelljammer: Adventures in Space
2e
Ephemeral: Ephemerals are noncorporeal undead believed to be the spirits of individuals who have died in the phlogiston.
The touch of the ephemeral inflicts 1-4 points of damage and reduces the victim 's Intelligence by 1-2 points. Should the damage inflicted by an ephemeral kill a sentient humanoid, the latter will become an ephemeral in 2-8 days.
The origin of the ephemerals is a mystery. They might be the remains of a race of beings who managed to crack their crystal shell, letting the phlogiston into their sphere. Whatever their origin, they have propagated by preying on intelligent creatures that pass through the Flow.
Ghast Double Normal Hit Dice: ?
Mind Flayer Wight: ?

Undead: ?
Skeleton: ?
Zombie: ?
Mummy: These creatures are rare in space, as they are usually the result of intricate burial procedures. These procedures are followed by some subcults of Ptah, so there are mummies in all the Known Spheres.
Wraith: ?
Juju Zombie: Those humanoids affected by the wizardly energy drain spell.
Monster Zombie: ?
Ghoul: ?
Ghast: ?
Wight: ?
Shadow: ?
Ghost: ?
Spectre: ?
Vampire: Mind flayers and other monstrous creatures are not immune to a vampire's energy drain, but do not turn into vampires upon being slain.
Lich: ?
Vecna, Lich: ?
 

Voadam

Hero
The Awakening (2e)
2e
Crypt Cat: Crypt cats begin life as pampered pets or as sacred animals of a cat-worshiping cult. Their bodies are placed in tombs beside those of their owners or beside a priest or priestess of the cult, so that their spirits might accompany that person into the afterlife. They will fight until destroyed to defend this former master. They will also rise from their sarcophagi to defend their tomb against desecration or robbery.
The composition of the clay that animates a crypt cat is unknown, although it is assumed that high-level necromancy spells are involved.
Crypt Cat Large: Sometimes the bodies of larger felines are made into crypt cats.
Sachmet, Mummy: As the tomb neared completion, the families of those who had died appealed to the followers of Set for aid, and that secret society quietly and efficiently arranged Sachmet's death. The next time Sachmet chose a man to "play with" in her private chambers, she unwittingly picked Kematef, a priest of Set who had been instructed to call attention to himself by harming one of the sacred cats. Kematef, whose teeth had been hollowed out, pretended to seduce Sachmet and then bit her neck, injecting her with a deadly poison. Because Set was a more powerful deity than Bast, Sachmet could not be cured—she died before nightfall.
Sachmet was carefully embalmed and laid to rest in the unfinished tomb, but the servants of Set were not finished with her. To prevent Sachmet from rising from her tomb, they placed a minor artifact—the staff of Set—at the entrance of the tomb, effectively forcing Sachmet into an eternal slumber and sealing her inside. As Set's minions crept away, a mist began to rise around the giant statue. All through the night it deepened. The next morning, when the mist cleared, Sachmet's tomb had vanished without trace.
As a high priestess of Bast, Sachmet was granted nine lives by the cat goddess. The first was her mortal life. To prepare Sachmet for her next eight incarnations, the priestesses of Bast embalmed her body with clays mixed with special oils and potions, using spells to make their effects permanent. This process sealed her ba (the portion of the soul that contains a person's physical vitality) inside her body. They then stored her ka (the portion of the soul that contains a person's mental vitality) inside magical canopic thought jars.
But the worshippers of Set had one final trick to play. Secretly, they slipped dust of dryness into one of the embalming oils. As a result, Sachmet's flesh shrivelled on her bones as the water leeched from her body. Hence, Sachmet is an emaciated corpse. Her flesh is shriveled like dried fruit and her bones are visible through parchment-yellow skin. Her hair clings in dark clumps to her scalp and her eyes are dried to husks. When she moves, her bones make a faint grinding noise. Her neck bears two puncture marks, a legacy of the attack by the priest of Set. Sachmet will rise from her tomb a total of eight times before she can be laid to rest permanently.
Sachmet, Mummy First Awakening: ?
Sachmet, Mummy Second Awakening: Each time Sachmet is reduced to 0 hit points, her body crumbles to dust and her ba flies back to her tomb, where a new body forms inside her sarcophagus for it to enter. This body is identical in appearance to each of her previous undead bodies. It requires 1d4 turns to form.
Sachmet, Mummy Third Awakening: Each time Sachmet is reduced to 0 hit points, her body crumbles to dust and her ba flies back to her tomb, where a new body forms inside her sarcophagus for it to enter. This body is identical in appearance to each of her previous undead bodies. It requires 1d4 turns to form.
Sachmet, Mummy Fourth Awakening: Each time Sachmet is reduced to 0 hit points, her body crumbles to dust and her ba flies back to her tomb, where a new body forms inside her sarcophagus for it to enter. This body is identical in appearance to each of her previous undead bodies. It requires 1d4 turns to form.
Sachmet, Mummy Fifth Awakening: Each time Sachmet is reduced to 0 hit points, her body crumbles to dust and her ba flies back to her tomb, where a new body forms inside her sarcophagus for it to enter. This body is identical in appearance to each of her previous undead bodies. It requires 1d4 turns to form.
Sachmet, Mummy Sixth Awakening: Each time Sachmet is reduced to 0 hit points, her body crumbles to dust and her ba flies back to her tomb, where a new body forms inside her sarcophagus for it to enter. This body is identical in appearance to each of her previous undead bodies. It requires 1d4 turns to form.
Sachmet, Mummy Seventh Awakening: Each time Sachmet is reduced to 0 hit points, her body crumbles to dust and her ba flies back to her tomb, where a new body forms inside her sarcophagus for it to enter. This body is identical in appearance to each of her previous undead bodies. It requires 1d4 turns to form.
Sachmet, Mummy Eighth Awakening: Each time Sachmet is reduced to 0 hit points, her body crumbles to dust and her ba flies back to her tomb, where a new body forms inside her sarcophagus for it to enter. This body is identical in appearance to each of her previous undead bodies. It requires 1d4 turns to form.
Skeletal Mummy: When the tomb was nearing completion, those who had crafted its traps and constructed its tunnels were drowned here. The bones of nearly 50 stone masons, carpenters, and artists now molder under the brackish water.
The skeletons—actually skeletal mummies— rise up from their watery tomb to seek vengeance against those who murdered them. Unfortunately, the skeletons are no longer able to distinguish one human from the next.
Zombie Monster Tiger: ?
Zombie Monster Cat: ?
Kematef, Odem: ?

Zombie: ?
Ghoul: ?
Shadow: ?
Wight: ?
Wraith: ?
Mummy: ?
Spectre: ?
Vampire: ?
 

Voadam

Hero
The Evil Eye
2e
Ghost: ?
Apparition: ?
Leyla, 2nd-Magnitude Ghost: When she was alive, Leyla was a nurturing wife, but death robbed her of a chance to be a mother. The karmic resonance of her dying, augmented by Raul's violin of passion, brought some part of her back as a ghost. The ghost is more a twisted embodiment of Raul's grief, memory, and passion than an accurate representation of Leyla when she was alive. She is a pale echo of her former self.
Corpse Candle: ?
Geist: ?
Odem: ?
Lord Soth: ?
Count Strahd von Zarovich: ?
Vampire: ?
 

Voadam

Hero
The Forgotten Terror
2e
Marble, Banshee, Fifth Magnitude Ghost: On the horrible night years ago when Marble’s life blood spewed onto Kartak’s reconstructed corpse, she willed herself to avenge her murder So strong was her hatred of the lich Kartak and her brother Chardath, so powerful was her will, that she actually recreated herself into a unique ghost of tremendous power.
Kartak Spellseer, “The All-Seeing”, Lich: ?
 

Voadam

Hero
The Gothic Earth Gazetteer
2e
Sitting Bull, Ghost: What if the ghosts of Sitting Bull and his followers returned to exact vengeance on the men who slaughtered them?
The most common belief is simply that the ghosts of Sitting Bull and his people remain near the area where they were killed. Without a doubt, numerous reports of spectral beings, mysterious sounds, and unexplained deaths can be confirmed near Wounded Knee. Sitting Bull was certainly dedicated to his cause, and if ever there were a man with the passion to sustain himself after death, it was the great Sitting Bull.
It is impossible to say at this time whether the forces haunting Wounded Knee are aspects of Sitting Bull and his followers—spirits called into existence by the power of their ghost dances—or an unrelated phenomenon whose manifestation at this time and place is utterly unrelated to the massacre of the Sioux people.
Ghost: What if the ghosts of Sitting Bull and his followers returned to exact vengeance on the men who slaughtered them?
The most common belief is simply that the ghosts of Sitting Bull and his people remain near the area where they were killed. Without a doubt, numerous reports of spectral beings, mysterious sounds, and unexplained deaths can be confirmed near Wounded Knee. Sitting Bull was certainly dedicated to his cause, and if ever there were a man with the passion to sustain himself after death, it was the great Sitting Bull.
It is impossible to say at this time whether the forces haunting Wounded Knee are aspects of Sitting Bull and his followers—spirits called into existence by the power of their ghost dances—or an unrelated phenomenon whose manifestation at this time and place is utterly unrelated to the massacre of the Sioux people.
During the days of the race to build the transcontinental railroad, many lives were lost to accidents and mishaps. Not all of these souls rest easily in their graves.
Count Dracula: ?

Banshee: ?
Crawling Claw: ?
Crypt Thing: ?
Ghost: ?
Ghoul: ?
Haunt: ?
Heucuva: ?
Lich: ?
Living Wall: ?
Mummy: ?
Mummy Greater: ?
Poltergeist: ?
Revenant: ?
Shadow: ?
Skeleton: ?
Skeleton Giant: ?
Skeleton Warrior: ?
Spectre: ?
Vampire: ?
Wight: ?
Zombie: ?
Baneguard: ?
Blazing Bones: ?
Crypt Servant: ?
Dread: ?
Flameskull: ?
Lich Psionic: ?
Naga Bone: ?
Spectral Wizard: ?
Tuyewera: ?
Undead Lake Monster: ?
Agarat: ?
Dark Hood: ?
Gray Philosopher: ?
Vampire Velya: ?
Zombie Lightning: ?
Dhaot: ?
Kaisharga: ?
Krag: ?
Kragling: ?
Meorty: ?
Raaig: ?
Racked Spirit: ?
Undead: ?
Wraith Athasian: ?
Zombie Thinking: ?
 

Voadam

Hero
The Nightmare Lands
2e
Lost Soul: Lost souls are the animated mortal remains of wanderers who die in the Nightmare Lands.
When a wanderer dies in the Terrain Between, there is a chance (40%) that the innate power of the land will cause the remains to rise as a zombie-like being called a lost soul. Once a lost soul is created, it immediately searches for others of its undead kind. When it finds them, it merges with them to become a single entity made up of the tangled, rotting bodies of many dead wanderers.
A wanderer who dies in a dreamscape has a chance (60%) to become a somewhat different type of lost soul. A lost soul animated in a dreamscape is more insubstantial, more ghostlike. Like the zombie lost soul, the dream lost soul seeks out others of its kind and merges to form a mass of writhing, moaning spirits.
The Ghost Dancer: As her name implies, she is an incorporeal creature who now searches the nightmares of the living in an effort to understand her own death.

Shadow: Shadow asps are 1-foot-long coils of shadow. Their bite can turn victims into shadows.
Shadow Asp shadow poison (Save vs. poison or become shadow in 5 rounds).
Sea Zombie: ?
Zombie: ?
Ghoul: ?
 

Halloween Horror For 5E

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