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Unusual Food Thread

Zardnaar

Legend
A spin off from unusual sandwiches thread.

As the title says.

Post anything unusual or perhaps specific to your country/region. Generic food with a twist is also fine.
 

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Zardnaar

Legend
My first entry. New Zealand chocolate bus quite good and blows Hershey/Cadbury out of the water.

Whittaker's often come up with unusual flavours using Australian and Kiwi brands.

IMG_20200823_140235.jpg


Ginger beer and caramel flavoured chocolate.

Tastes like ginger beer and caramel. Not as sweet as normal caramel chocolate.

I like it but probably not enough to buy it again over more normal flavours.
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I currently live in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area of Texas. Big cities, lots of suburbs, and plenty of diversity in ethnic cuisine. So it’s kinda hard for me to gauge what’s unusual.

However...

Because of the long, storied history with neighboring Mexico and the realities of the labor market around here, Mexican cuisine has become kind of the “universal solvent” for fusion cuisine and fusion restaurants around the state. Mexican cooks are in kitchens EVERYWHERE, and a lot of them are putting their spin on things.

Besides the ubiquitous Tex-Mex restaurants, I’ve been in a couple of Tex-Chinese and Tex-Indian places. And I’ve seen more than a few dishes that combine Mexican elements on restaurant menus, like flautas, tamales and tacos* on some Chinese buffets.

There was a restaurant I used to frequent** where the Chinese owner and her Mexican cook created barbacoa wontons.





* right next to pepperoni pizza!

** they closed in February for non-pandemic family reasons.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I currently live in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area of Texas. Big cities, lots of suburbs, and plenty of diversity in ethnic cuisine. So it’s kinda hard for me to gauge what’s unusual.

However...

Because of the long, storied history with neighboring Mexico and the realities of the labor market around here, Mexican cuisine has become kind of the “universal solvent” for fusion cuisine and fusion restaurants around the state. Mexican cooks are in kitchens EVERYWHERE, and a lot of them are putting their spin on things.

Besides the ubiquitous Tex-Mex restaurants, I’ve been in a couple of Tex-Chinese and Tex-Indian places. And I’ve seen more than a few dishes that combine Mexican elements on restaurant menus, like flautas, tamales and tacos* on some Chinese buffets.

There was a restaurant I used to frequent** where the Chinese owner and her Mexican cook created barbacoa wontons.





* right next to pepperoni pizza!

** they closed in February for non-pandemic family reasons.
I've been blending Mexican and middle eastern foods.
I had plans on home made Indian and used the ingredients in home made Mexican.

Locally we've got a little bit of everything but the popular ones are fish and chips (usually Chinese as well), Turkish and Indian seem to be popular. There's 6 or 7 Turkish places in a 1 kilometers stretch. Few Japanese and Korean places as well.

By that I mean you can find one in almost every block in town.

Small city but one block both sides is mostly restaurants.

Variety of food trucks as well with Spanish, Argentina, Jordanian options along with the usual suspects (Chinese, burgers).

Latest experiment was trying a new Syrian place.

Our town square is actually an Octogon, called the Octogon. It's full of various bars and restaurants a couple of which we rate highly.

One if the kebab places is Kurdish. His kebabs are delicious but his shish while nice is beaten by my favorite Turkish place so depending on what we want we go wherever. Usually the Kurdish option since it's over the road from D&D.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I love the potential of fusion cuisine. Mom tried something a few years back by combining some leftover biriyani rice from a very good Indian place with my own leftover creole greens because we were out of white rice.

It was killer.
 

Ulfgeir

Adventurer
One type of candy that is very popular here in Sweden.

"Djungelvrål" which would translate as "djungle howl". It is licorice with a layer of extremely salty content. Once you get past that it is sweet.
1598171822385.png
 

Ulfgeir

Adventurer
As for proper food:

Matjessill - Pickled filets of herring, served traditionally with boiled fresh potatoes (with butter on it), sourcream and chives. Very popular during the summer. Especially Midsummer. Often also accompanied with hardboiled eggs cut in half, with a bit of mayo on top and then red or black fish roe. At typical midsummer parties you usually get lots of different tupes of pickled herring, and copious amounts of alcohol in the form of Snaps Tradition has that you sing a short song before taking the snaps.. We also often version of pickled herring during Christmas and Easter...

Smörgåstårta - Basically layered pieces of white bread with various fillings inside, then covererd with various types of cold cut meats or shrimp, and fish. Betetr read the Wiki-article on it. It can be very good, but personally I do not want any liver paté in it.

Surströmming - Fermented herring. It smells awful. A former colleague of mine phrased it like "I can understand that you can really fail when maing food, but doing it again, and thinking it is good?"
 

Zardnaar

Legend
As for proper food:

Matjessill - Pickled filets of herring, served traditionally with boiled fresh potatoes (with butter on it), sourcream and chives. Very popular during the summer. Especially Midsummer. Often also accompanied with hardboiled eggs cut in half, with a bit of mayo on top and then red or black fish roe. At typical midsummer parties you usually get lots of different tupes of pickled herring, and copious amounts of alcohol in the form of Snaps Tradition has that you sing a short song before taking the snaps.. We also often version of pickled herring during Christmas and Easter...

Smörgåstårta - Basically layered pieces of white bread with various fillings inside, then covererd with various types of cold cut meats or shrimp, and fish. Betetr read the Wiki-article on it. It can be very good, but personally I do not want any liver paté in it.

Surströmming - Fermented herring. It smells awful. A former colleague of mine phrased it like "I can understand that you can really fail when maing food, but doing it again, and thinking it is good?"
Generally avoid seafood. A bit of deep fried blue cod, sole, or hoki once or twice a year is about my limit.

Seafood pizza, not good.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I love the potential of fusion cuisine. Mom tried something a few years back by combining some leftover biriyani rice from a very good Indian place with my own leftover creole greens because we were out of white rice.

It was killer.
Yeah Indian I quite like. Overdid it last year and had to have reduced salt diet.

Thinking of doing a potato or pasta bake but replacing the sauce with butter chicken or Tikka masala sauce and throw some paneer cheese in it.


IMG_20200823_190604.jpg

Passion fruit and mango yoghurt with crushed weetbix. Breakfast experiment.

Weetbix. Intergenerational breakfast cereal very low in fat,suger, taste etc

IMG_20200823_210903.jpg


It's the wheat version of unsweetened cornflakes pressed into biscuits.

Used to have them with butter and marmite.
 
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Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Weetbix. Intergenerational breakfast cereal very low in fat,suger, taste etc
Yeah, we have it here, too.

1598193115817.png




It's the wheat version of unsweetened cornflakes pressed into biscuits.
Except, you know, bad. Like eating compressed sawdust. Have used it as a representation of dwarven waybread, to give players the idea that dwarves will put up with a lot if it serves a purpose.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Yeah, we have it here, too.

View attachment 124987





Except, you know, bad. Like eating compressed sawdust. Have used it as a representation of dwarven waybread, to give players the idea that dwarves will put up with a lot if it serves a purpose.
It was for the benefit of the Americans and others. Outside UK/NZ/Oz a few foods don't exist as such.

You can get the UK version here. Try marmite or Vegemite on them.

As I said low in suger, salt, fat and taste.

Cereal has a shocking amount of suger in it. More than soda in a lot of cases.

We were raised on the stuff like most NZers. Hot water, milk suger enjoy tough luck if you don't like it.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Bacon
IMG_20200826_173521.jpg


Big deal right? Manuka smoked bacon however. Manuka is a wood indigenous to NZ. Has a nice smokey flavour moreso than most bacon. IDK if it's exported.

Very little fat as far as bacon goes either.

Added to home bad cheeseburgers with aioli and sweet chilli sauce, cooked an egg for wife's burger as well, not for me as I don't like chicken+egg that often.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I’ve never heard of manuka, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the guys who write those serious BBQ books knew about it in depth. Sounds pretty nice.
 



Zardnaar

Legend
Kumara (Polynesian sweet potato) fries in a pot.

IMG_20200829_182952.jpg


Beer battered (pilsner) blue cod.

IMG_20200829_182939.jpg


Not really unusual I suppose idk how it's done overseas.
IMG_20200829_201223.jpg


Peach roll ups, whipped cream carrot cake.
 
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Ryujin

Adventurer
Dulse. Just stick a wad of it in your mouth and chew it like chewing tobacco. Salty and full of essential vitamins, and minerals. It's a thing from my youth in the Canadian Maritime Provinces and, unfortunately, the only places that I can seem to find it these days are vegan shops, at insanely marked-up prices.

 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I got some dried dulse a few years ago at a Nature’s Grocery near me. That’s a store 1 part grocery, 1?part vitamin store, 1 part new age shop.

It wasn’t bad, but I was the only one who really enjoyed it at all.
 

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