log in or register to remove this ad

 

Unusual Food Thread

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I like a good savory pie. Most of the ones around my neck of the woods are chicken pot pies, shepherds pie, or steak & mushroom pies.

Far more varieties are available in the assorted hand pies around here- mostly empanadas and samosas.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Zardnaar

Legend
I like a good savory pie. Most of the ones around my neck of the woods are chicken pot pies, shepherds pie, or steak & mushroom pies.

Far more varieties are available in the assorted hand pies around here- mostly empanadas and samosas.

Steak and mushroom us a thing here.

Basically all the service stations have them and a good chunk of the cafes. State and cheese is kind of the default.

American expats tend to like them along with Turkish kebabs.

They're getting inventive with the fillings so you can get an English style pie with Indian/Thai/Malaysian fillings.

Butter chicken pie not a problem. Coconut and lime Thai curry sure.

I very rarely eat them for health reasons but yeah they taste pretty good.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
There’s a 50’s style diner near where I live that does a great, albeit non traditional chicken pot pie. Instead of using the traditional savory pie crust topping, thei is crowned by thick puff pastry style crust, with a dozen or so buttery layers. So freaking good!
 

Zardnaar

Legend
There’s a 50’s style diner near where I live that does a great, albeit non traditional chicken pot pie. Instead of using the traditional savory pie crust topping, thei is crowned by thick puff pastry style crust, with a dozen or so buttery layers. So freaking good!

Puff pastry you can buy at the supermarket here.

Home made bacon and egg pie yum. You can also buy that at a few bakerys.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Puff pastry you can buy at the supermarket here.

Same here. My Mom’s cousin used to make crawfish pie with store-bought puff pastries.

Which reminds me...my folks and I were once invited to a private party that was catered by a local chef. No, seriously, tall white hat, owned a restaurant, the whole deal.

The dish that stood out to me were his escargot tarts. Usually, escargot is served in the shell with a wonderful buttery, garlic sauce. Frequently, there’s more sauce than the mollusks morsel can deliver to your mouth, so it goes to waste...

This chef, however, eschewed the shell and made his dish into bite-sized tarts. The light crust contained the snail and the butter-garlic sauce that had been thickened to a soft paste- almost like peanut butter. So in something the size of a mini-Reese’s peanut butter cup, you got EVERYTHING! I confess, I made a pig of myself on those things, including repeatedly grabbing them from the platter in the front hall as we were chit-chatting before leaving.

I’ve never encountered anyone else doing escargot even remotely the same way.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Same here. My Mom’s cousin used to make crawfish pie with store-bought puff pastries.

Which reminds me...my folks and I were once invited to a private party that was catered by a local chef. No, seriously, tall white hat, owned a restaurant, the whole deal.

The dish that stood out to me were his escargot tarts. Usually, escargot is served in the shell with a wonderful buttery, garlic sauce. Frequently, there’s more sauce than the mollusks morsel can deliver to your mouth, so it goes to waste...

This chef, however, eschewed the shell and made his dish into bite-sized tarts. The light crust contained the snail and the butter-garlic sauce that had been thickened to a soft paste- almost like peanut butter. So in something the size of a mini-Reese’s peanut butter cup, you got EVERYTHING! I confess, I made a pig of myself on those things, including repeatedly grabbing them from the platter in the front hall as we were chit-chatting before leaving.

I’ve never encountered anyone else doing escargot even remotely the same way.

You can keep your snails and I'll raise you sweet and sour wontons on rice. Probably not that different to US wontons and faux Chinese.

IMG_20200912_190214.jpg
 


Zardnaar

Legend
Mid week can't be bothered cooking.

IMG_20200916_173755.jpg


Tikka Masala with pakoras. Cost around $25 USD for that, kadai chicken, pakoras and garlic naan bread. This is what's left over.

IMG_20200916_175121.jpg


Barely got through half of it so two meals for two people.

The Indian place is in my suburb so dodge the crowds and it's about a mile away.Getting washed down with a pilsner.

Not much in the way of Mexican here,plenty of curry places and this is our favorite.
 





Nobby-W

Far more clumsy and random than a blaster
Limes hard to find good ones. I think we have a lime and black pepper flavour.

Salt and Vinegar I like but I don't love.

When I was a kid you could get fries with vinegar in them. It's an English thing I guess.
Still very much a thing here on Pom Rock, but the local fish and chips are way too fatty for me by and large.
 

Nobby-W

Far more clumsy and random than a blaster
Rendang - my better half is from Indonesia. This is just a stock photo, but it's fabulous. Trouble is that you have to boil it down at a very low heat, so it takes about 6 or 8 hours to make.




Bonus Rendang recipe

Per kilo of beef:
  • 2" of galangal grated (this can be optional)
  • 1-2" of ginger, grated
  • 1/2" of turmeric root, grated
  • 2 kemiri (candle nuts)
  • About 10 red chillies (add another 10 birds eye chillies for extra heat)
  • Half a red onion or 10 red shallots
  • 6 cloves of garlic
  • 1 or two stalks lemongrass
  • Half a dozen kefir lime leaves
  • 1/2 nutmeg, grated
  • Two tins of coconut milk
  • Half a lump of brown coconut sugar (about one tablespoon)
Steps:
  1. Remove any connective tissue or gristle from the beef and cut into pieces about 2" x 2" x 1" (they need to be big as cooking will shrink them down).
  2. Peel the garlic, shallots, galangal, ginger and turmeric. Bruise the lemongrass.
  3. Put the chillies, ginger, garlic, turmeric, kemiri, chillies, shallots, garlic, sugar and nutmeg into a blender and blend until smooth.
  4. Fry the mixture until aromatic.
  5. Put the mixture with the coconut milk, lime leaves and lemongrass into a pot/wok and bring to the boil.
  6. In the meantime, brown the beef (this is a recommendation from the MIL, who is an actual Indonesian chef).
  7. (Optionally) boil down the coconut milk/spice mix a bit. The process involves slow cooking the meat, and if you are using softer beef like rump, boiling it for too long can make it start to disintegrate. If you're using tougher skirt or stewing steak you can put the beef in right away.
  8. Add the beef. Simmer until it starts to go dark brown. Stir every 5-10 minutes. You can boil vigourously at first, but as the mixture gets thicker you will need to turn it to a low heat. This process can take 6-8 hours.
  9. Once the fat starts coming off it, you need to turn it right down and stir every 5-10 minutes until the bumbu is solid enough. It should not be too liquid to stick to the beef. At this point it's done.
It will look like you're putting an ungodly amount of chilli into the mix, but the cooking takes the edge off the heat, leaving a nice slow burn effect. Serve with rice and something green. Cassava is traditional but cucumber or cabbage works well.

Rendang is quite happy to be frozen and reheated as many times as you want. In fact, it gets better with re-heating. If it's properly done it can last a month with no refrigeration (it was originally invented as trail rations), but don't try this at home.
 


Zardnaar

Legend
Rendang - my better half is from Indonesia. This is just a stock photo, but it's fabulous. Trouble is that you have to boil it down at a very low heat, so it takes about 6 or 8 hours to make.




Bonus Rendang recipe

Per kilo of beef:
  • 2" of galangal grated (this can be optional)
  • 1-2" of ginger, grated
  • 1/2" of turmeric root, grated
  • 2 kemiri (candle nuts)
  • About 10 red chillies (add another 10 birds eye chillies for extra heat)
  • Half a red onion or 10 red shallots
  • 6 cloves of garlic
  • 1 or two stalks lemongrass
  • Half a dozen kefir lime leaves
  • 1/2 nutmeg, grated
  • Two tins of coconut milk
  • Half a lump of brown coconut sugar (about one tablespoon)
Steps:
  1. Remove any connective tissue or gristle from the beef and cut into pieces about 2" x 2" x 1" (they need to be big as cooking will shrink them down).
  2. Peel the garlic, shallots, galangal, ginger and turmeric. Bruise the lemongrass.
  3. Put the chillies, ginger, garlic, turmeric, kemiri, chillies, shallots, garlic, sugar and nutmeg into a blender and blend until smooth.
  4. Fry the mixture until aromatic.
  5. Put the mixture with the coconut milk, lime leaves and lemongrass into a pot/wok and bring to the boil.
  6. In the meantime, brown the beef (this is a recommendation from the MIL, who is an actual Indonesian chef).
  7. (Optionally) boil down the coconut milk/spice mix a bit. The process involves slow cooking the meat, and if you are using softer beef like rump, boiling it for too long can make it start to disintegrate. If you're using tougher skirt or stewing steak you can put the beef in right away.
  8. Add the beef. Simmer until it starts to go dark brown. Stir every 5-10 minutes. You can boil vigourously at first, but as the mixture gets thicker you will need to turn it to a low heat. This process can take 6-8 hours.
  9. Once the fat starts coming off it, you need to turn it right down and stir every 5-10 minutes until the bumbu is solid enough. It should not be too liquid to stick to the beef. At this point it's done.
It will look like you're putting an ungodly amount of chilli into the mix, but the cooking takes the edge off the heat, leaving a nice slow burn effect. Serve with rice and something green. Cassava is traditional but cucumber or cabbage works well.

Rendang is quite happy to be frozen and reheated as many times as you want. In fact, it gets better with re-heating. If it's properly done it can last a month with no refrigeration (it was originally invented as trail rations), but don't try this at home.

I would give that a shot. I've discovered I like SEA food more than the Chinese/Japanese people are more used to.

Except maybe Thai not a massive fan. Cambodian, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia and Phillipines have a few winning dishes.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I love most asian cuisine. with Vietnamese, Japanese, and Chinese usually jockeying for 1st. Indian is in the top 5 conversation.

I like Thai a lot, and have found a couple really good places near me, but usually gave to fine alone. And I’m still trying to figure Korean out. I keep missing out on opportunities to try Nepalese.

But damn if I haven’t fallen for Burmese! The best description I csn give is what the owner/chef at Inlay told me the first day I walked into her place: it’s a little like Chinese, a little like Indian, a little like Thai...and different from al, of them.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I love most asian cuisine. with Vietnamese, Japanese, and Chinese usually jockeying for 1st. Indian is in the top 5 conversation.

I like Thai a lot, and have found a couple really good places near me, but usually gave to fine alone. And I’m still trying to figure Korean out. I keep missing out on opportunities to try Nepalese.

But damn if I haven’t fallen for Burmese! The best description I csn give is what the owner/chef at Inlay told me the first day I walked into her place: it’s a little like Chinese, a little like Indian, a little like Thai...and different from al, of them.

A lot of Thai cooking uses coconut cream. Not a fan of it.

Korean seems a bit more grilled, Chinese usually not that authentic or that good. Lots of regional variety if you can find the semi authentic stuff

Haven't tried burmese. We have Cambodian. It costs the same as a Big Mac combo. Satay is the big Cambodian thing but my local does this ginger beef dish I really like.

Took mum there when she was getting cancer treatment. Out of some of the nicer places (read expensive) she liked her simple $7 whatever on rice Cambodian meals over Turkish and Korean although she liked Korean as well.

Japanese places here seem to be owned by Koreans. Waitress said she was from Beijing so go figure.

Local fish and chip shop dies some Malaysian dishes, apparently they're good.

Satay burgers are also a thing here at Cambodian places and rarely a fish and chip shop.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
There was a short-lived asian restaurant @30min from where I live now. It’s been replaced by a damn good Thai place that makes a pho-like duck soup that I’m totally addicted to. I order it nearly every time.

The place that used to be there also had a destination dish: it was a small whole chicken roasted in a covered clay pot with rice, mushrooms and garlic. The whole pot was brought to the table. Fall off the bone tender.

And I've never seen it anywhere else.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
There was a short-lived asian restaurant @30min from where I live now. It’s been replaced by a damn good Thai place that makes a pho-like duck soup that I’m totally addicted to. I order it nearly every time.

The place that used to be there also had a destination dish: it was a small whole chicken roasted in a covered clay pot with rice, mushrooms and garlic. The whole pot was brought to the table. Fall off the bone tender.

And I've never seen it anywhere else.
Some things I had from places that closed.

Saffron chicken dish from an Iranian place. Never seen it before or since. They said not many people ordered it since they sold $7 wraps but it cost $17 fifteen years ago.

They made this amazing chicken burger as well.

Phillipines place also operated that was great but only went there once. Decor was this amazing 19th century wood paneling and the roof was designed to evoke a ships keep. Some sort of lemon chicken dish.

Also have 7 or 8 Turkish places more or less on top of one another almost one every block. One street has 3 of them on a 100 meter stretch.
 

Halloween Horror For 5E

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top