Want To Playtest The Fallout RPG?

Modiphius has just opened up the sign-up process for the closed beta of the upcoming Fallout RPG.

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Details below:

Modiphius Entertainment is excited to announce that the closed beta sign ups for the Fallout 2d20 RPG are now live! The closed beta will allow you and your group to play test the upcoming official Fallout 2d20 RPG and have your feedback implemented within its design.

You can sign up below. Deadlines for sign ups finish on 13/01/2020 at midnight. Please note not everyone who signs up will receive a play-test spot and play-testing will be dependent on you signing an NDA.

Thanks and we look forward to having you on board as a play-tester!

 
Russ Morrissey

Comments

lyle.spade

Explorer
Signed up when I got the notice by email. I'm a fan of 2d20, having enjoyed it with Star Trek, Conan, and a home-brew. I'm interested in seeing what they do with this property, and Dune, too.

I hope I'm selected.
 

wicked cool

Explorer
whats the difference of the d20 vs 2d20? the miniature line has great models although they are super expensive

I love the idea of this franchise-Truly feel that a tv show (big buget hbo/Netflix etc) based on a vault and a bunch of dwellers and exploration outside would be epic
 

lyle.spade

Explorer
whats the difference of the d20 vs 2d20? the miniature line has great models although they are super expensive

I love the idea of this franchise-Truly feel that a tv show (big buget hbo/Netflix etc) based on a vault and a bunch of dwellers and exploration outside would be epic
They're completely different systems, mechanically. The core role in 2d20 is this: you roll two d20s and try to meet or beat (high is always best) your Target Number, which is the sum of a skill and a governing trait. For example, in Conan, you'd use use your Melee skill to club someone. That skill is under Agility. Skills are single-digit scores, and some stats are in the low double digits, so a decent character might have, say, a 12 in Melee. You roll two d20s and for each 12 or higher you get, you get a success. Difficulty is determined by the number of successes needed - 1 through 5 - and additional successes generate "Momentum," on a 1:1 basis. Momentum can be spent immediately to gain any of a variety of effects - extra damage, disarm, another attack, etc. - or banked in a party pool which is accessible by everyone.

In a nutshell, 2d20 provides a means by which surplus success can be used to enhance and shape results immediately, or banked and used later. It's a really good system, I think, and shares similarities with FFG's Star Wars (which makes sense since both systems share the same person as a lead designer), but in practice I think it flows a lot better at the table (having played both).
 
whats the difference of the d20 vs 2d20?
There are lots of specific mechanical differences, of course, but I think what you're asking is "what's the difference such that you don't want to play a 2d20 game?"

For my part, the answer isn't that (or isn't just that) the 2d20 system is itself worse than d20, but that I'm almost always dissatisfied when a generic system is ported to a specific setting.

For example, I really do enjoy playing D&D, but when the 5e system is ported to an established setting, one that comes packed with expectations....Star Wars, Middle Earth, Old West, Pirates, Lovecraftian horror, etc....I've never much liked the result.

I think (to dive down into this) the problem is that every system of game mechanics is only the very roughest approximation of a reality. It's highly "lossy", to use a data compression term. And the designers have to make a decision about what bits of reality are thrown away, and which are emphasized. And also which bits of unreality are emphasized. And when you map those decisions to another setting, the fit is usually poor.

I do suspect that I'm in a tiny minority with this stance. And I also recognize that designing and playtesting a new system is a LOT more work than just porting an existing one. Just stating my position.
 

aramis erak

Adventurer
whats the difference of the d20 vs 2d20? the miniature line has great models although they are super expensive

I love the idea of this franchise-Truly feel that a tv show (big buget hbo/Netflix etc) based on a vault and a bunch of dwellers and exploration outside would be epic
d20: 1d20 + Mods, roll high. If multiple 20's rolled, it's always keep 1.

2d20: 2d20 to 5d20, by how much you spend from expendables, each counted against 1 or 2 target numbers, to find total "successes," one of which is TNx (Stat A + Stat B), the other, TNxx is either stat B alone, or a third stat, stat C, limited to Stat B. Roll under TN X to get 1 success, and under TN XX to get a second.
In Star Trek, it's Attribute + Discipline for X, and 1 for XX, unless one has a focus that applies, in which case XX is equal to DIscipline.
John Carter, it'sTNX is Attribute A + Attribute B.
Mutant Chronicles and Conan 3e are TN X = Attribute+ Skill, TN XX = 1 or Focus (each skill has a separately learnable focus score, which cannot exceed skill)

My issues with it aren't how the dice are read (I don't mind roll-low), but in how the number of dice are determined, and how that tends to snowball.
 

Doc_Klueless

Doors and Corners
They're completely different systems, mechanically. The core role in 2d20 is this: you roll two d20s and try to meet or beat (high is always best) your Target Number, which is the sum of a skill and a governing trait.
Backwards. It's a roll LOW system. A one is considered a double success. A 20 is considered a complications. Aramis does a good job of describing it though I got lost in the TNx, TNXX, etc. Ha! But that's because it's early and I haven't finished my coffee. 😄

This website has a really good run down on the basics of 2d20 and how they differ from one 2d20 game to the next. Which 2d20?
 

lyle.spade

Explorer
Backwards. It's a roll LOW system. A one is considered a double success. A 20 is considered a complications. Aramis does a good job of describing it though I got lost in the TNx, TNXX, etc. Ha! But that's because it's early and I haven't finished my coffee. 😄

This website has a really good run down on the basics of 2d20 and how they differ from one 2d20 game to the next. Which 2d20?
He is correct - my mistake!
 

imagineGod

Explorer
d20: 1d20 + Mods, roll high. If multiple 20's rolled, it's always keep 1.

2d20: 2d20 to 5d20, by how much you spend from expendables, each counted against 1 or 2 target numbers, to find total "successes," one of which is TNx (Stat A + Stat B), the other, TNxx is either stat B alone, or a third stat, stat C, limited to Stat B. Roll under TN X to get 1 success, and under TN XX to get a second.
In Star Trek, it's Attribute + Discipline for X, and 1 for XX, unless one has a focus that applies, in which case XX is equal to DIscipline.
John Carter, it'sTNX is Attribute A + Attribute B.
Mutant Chronicles and Conan 3e are TN X = Attribute+ Skill, TN XX = 1 or Focus (each skill has a separately learnable focus score, which cannot exceed skill)

My issues with it aren't how the dice are read (I don't mind roll-low), but in how the number of dice are determined, and how that tends to snowball.
And the mathematics have confused me. Probably, several newbies have been scared away from 2d20 after reading the X and XX overview of the system.
 

Beleriphon

Totally Awesome Pirate Brain
I don't especially care so long as I can be SPECIAL.

In fact other than the original Fallout games be based on percentile target systems its still an Attribute + Skill setup. Fallout 4 obviously doesn't do that, but I also like the way Fallout 4 handles skills and what not in terms of a video game.
 

lyle.spade

Explorer
And the mathematics have confused me. Probably, several newbies have been scared away from 2d20 after reading the X and XX overview of the system.
The system is odd for olde tyme d20 players, and in fact I got the Star Trek play test materials and was confused by it - to the point that I didn't end up participating, which was frustrating because I'm a big ST fan. Anyway, a guy I know ran the Free RPG Day scenario for their Conan game, so I played it more for getting a feel for the system than for wrestling snakes. I ended up liking the system a lot, and our group went on to play Conan (no snakes yet wrestled, sadly) for several months and now Modiphius has a heap of my money in trade for a large stack of Conan books.

The system is great for players who want options, but within a rules framework that is consistent in terms of how it functions. We've had a great time shaping the story and the action both in combat and out of it, and so I've become a big fan of 2d20 and Momentum. In fact, I am testing a version of that subsystem in my 5e game right now - I want my players to have action options without burying them in add'l rules.

All that said, I'm looking forward to play testing Fallout. I have almost zero experience with that IP, and played Gamma World way back when, so this sounds like a fun world in which to play.
 
Just as a counter opinion, I wanted to say I really like 2d20. It's intuitive and has built in tools for giving players (both individually and as a group) real choice in how easy or tough things get. It's adaptable too: I was initially skeptical the same core system could do both Conan and Star Trek but the details of each individual game makes the difference. I have no doubt they'll be able to make Fallout feel like Fallout with it.

My only hesitation is in which flavor of Fallout they are going to be targeting: Black Isle/Obsidian or Bethesda.
 

lyle.spade

Explorer
Just as a counter opinion, I wanted to say I really like 2d20. It's intuitive and has built in tools for giving players (both individually and as a group) real choice in how easy or tough things get. It's adaptable too: I was initially skeptical the same core system could do both Conan and Star Trek but the details of each individual game makes the difference. I have no doubt they'll be able to make Fallout feel like Fallout with it.

My only hesitation is in which flavor of Fallout they are going to be targeting: Black Isle/Obsidian or Bethesda.
I agree with you on the system completely.

As for Fallout...no idea! I had a copy that I played, briefly, on a Win95, and I don't remember a thing about the IP, outside of it being post-apocalyptic and that it had some 50s kitsch in it.
 

Beleriphon

Totally Awesome Pirate Brain
I agree with you on the system completely.

As for Fallout...no idea! I had a copy that I played, briefly, on a Win95, and I don't remember a thing about the IP, outside of it being post-apocalyptic and that it had some 50s kitsch in it.
Dark humour is also part of it, the new games take that a bit run more into satire than dark humour. Also the term I think you're looking for is Retro-futurism (what the 2076 would like in a copy of 1950s Popular Mechanics). Oh and a heavy, heavy dose of Red Scare paranoia.
 

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