log in or register to remove this ad

 

What are you reading this year 2020?


log in or register to remove this ad

univoxs

That's my dog, Walter
Supporter
What's the Alliance Union book?
I just reread the Cyteen sequel last year; still have to go back and reread Cyteen itself.
I've read almost all* of her SF and love it. I have a harder time with the fantasy. Paladin I did really enjoy; and the Morgaine Cycle is awesome, but I just couldn't parse the first Fortress book and Rusalka didn't draw me in. I'm going to try the Fortress books again though.

*I read the first three or four Foreigner trilogies and then quit, so I'm not up on those.
Cyteen takes place in the Alliance Union universe, along with books like Hellburner, Down Below Station and Merchanter's Luck. The new Alliance Union book was called Alliance Rising and takes place a bit earlier in the timeline than Cyteen does, before the war mentioned in that book. I believe all her SF is connected, the last Forigner cycle connected itself to Alliance Union, something she intended all along but could not do originally for publishing reasons. Chanuar books are also a part of that universe as well, if only remotely. Faded Sun, Hestia, Hammerfall, and other books all connect remotley, some from distant time periods. Supposedly Morgaine, her first series, is the furthest out along the timeline.
Fortress is not my favorite either but I liked the last book in the series, Fortress of Ice? I have often jumped into her series right in the middle and gone back. First book I read of hers was the last Chanuar and it made me fall in love with her writing. Take a shot at Fortress of Ice maybe. She is good enough that it usually is not a problem.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
Cyteen takes place in the Alliance Union universe, along with books like Hellburner, Down Below Station and Merchanter's Luck. The new Alliance Union book was called Alliance Rising and takes place a bit earlier in the timeline than Cyteen does, before the war mentioned in that book. I believe all her SF is connected, the last Forigner cycle connected itself to Alliance Union, something she intended all along but could not do originally for publishing reasons. Chanuar books are also a part of that universe as well, if only remotely. Faded Sun, Hestia, Hammerfall, and other books all connect remotley, some from distant time periods. Supposedly Morgaine, her first series, is the furthest out along the timeline.
Fortress is not my favorite either but I liked the last book in the series, Fortress of Ice? I have often jumped into her series right in the middle and gone back. First book I read of hers was the last Chanuar and it made me fall in love with her writing. Take a shot at Fortress of Ice maybe. She is good enough that it usually is not a problem.
I'm aware of the Alliance-Union Universe and the connections, although I hadn't heard that the Foreigner series had been connected. Chanur definitely connects, and I don't think it's very far out in the timeline either. It's just heard to tell because of the viewpoint.
I've been reading her stuff for years. I forget what was first - might've been Hellburner. The Tree of Swords and Jewels I'd definitely read by college, so I was pretty up on a lot of her stuff by then. I pick up the older stuff as I find it; when I unpack books I'll do an accounting and see what's left.

Edit: I recently got most of the Fortress books (somewhere...), so yeah, it'd definitely on my list to tackle again.
 


I loved the Malazan Book of the Fallen series. Been thinking about doing a re-read soon, but that is no small commitment.

I'm not seeing all that much love for Malazan books. I only do them as audio. You think there would be a game out for it by now too, especially seeing as it was born orignally from the author learning to play AD&D.
 

I don't know about that. There's a lot of fiction that has elements that don't hold up over time, that people once lauded. It's okay to still enjoy problematic works (it's also okay to just be done with them, too), but it's important to address and think about those issues. To read these works uncritically doesn't do anyone any favors.

There's also a world of difference between Beowulf and Kothar. I don't think anyone's featuring Kothar in their syllabus, for starters.

Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed reading Kothar, but the rampant sexism bothered me (though I'm still not entirely sure whether Fox was mocking the genre or not). People change, and societal mores change, over time. And heck, even back when the Kothar tales were written, I guarantee women did not enjoy being treated the way they are depicted being treated in the books.

The way i see it there is no such thing as good stories becoming dated. If it was good I'll bet 20 years later when your kid reads it he'll be thinking huh...old but good just like you. Beowulf never gets old. Ive found the same is true of newer but still good stories that are none the less older than a lot of stories these days.
 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
I don't know Kothar, Beowulf is also a language study. Books can be all over the map, I don't think Gor is awesome, and it's not that long ago. Dumarest is sort of young men's adventure where he gets the space princess of the week, and people talk about those a lot. It still goes on, I am reading a friend's books, published by Baen, and there are parts like, oh man ...
 

I don't know about that. There's a lot of fiction that has elements that don't hold up over time, that people once lauded. It's okay to still enjoy problematic works (it's also okay to just be done with them, too), but it's important to address and think about those issues. To read these works uncritically doesn't do anyone any favors.

There's also a world of difference between Beowulf and Kothar. I don't think anyone's featuring Kothar in their syllabus, for starters.

Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed reading Kothar, but the rampant sexism bothered me (though I'm still not entirely sure whether Fox was mocking the genre or not). People change, and societal mores change, over time. And heck, even back when the Kothar tales were written, I guarantee women did not enjoy being treated the way they are depicted being treated in the books.
Gonna have to disagree with you. Oh well. Happens sometimes.
 

Finished Leiber's Swords in the Mist yesterday. Definitely a mixed bag. Lean Times in Lankhmar is hands-down one of the greatest Fafhrd and Grey Mouser tales. The Adept's Gambit, the novella that takes up the most space in it, that one just dragged and dragged.

Now I'm trying out The Palace Job, by Patrick Weekes.
 

carrot

Explorer
Just finished The True Bastards: Book 2 of the Lot Lands by Jonathan French. It's a mixed bag. It took ages for something interesting to happen, and then just went a bit nuts! I struggled to get through the first half, but it picked up enough that I'll get the next one if/when it comes out.

Now on to False Value the latest rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch. Only a couple of chapters in, but so far I'm enjoying it :)
 

Richards

Adventurer
I was on a business trip all week so I had lots of time to read on planes, in airports, and in my hotel room at night. As a result, I finished the following:

The Scar by China Miéville - A good read, with some great worldbuilding, so much so that I'm definitely going to track down Perdido Street Station by the same author, which is the book before this one. However, as much as I liked this second book, with its fascinating world and its multitude of awesome ideas, I kind of wish it had had a stronger ending than it did.

Verses for the Dead, by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child, the latest in the Agent Pendergast series to hit paperback. (My hotel room had a Barnes and Noble within walking distance - score!) The Agent Pendergast series is on my list of books I'm willing to pay full-price for, sight unseen (although I wait until they hit paperback, as all of the rest of the series I have in paperback and I don't like paying full price for hardcover books - I'll just wait the half a year until they come out in paperback). But this was an enjoyable read - Pendergast is kind of like a Fox Mulder in a world where the weirdness is constrained to the more technically plausible - so he investigates weird killings but you aren't going to encounter space aliens or Bigfoot or anything. This one dealt with a strange rash of murders of people who lived in Florida but were killed outside the state and made to look like suicides.

The Cutting Edge, by Jeffery Deaver, the last book (so far) in the Lincoln Rhyme series (now I have to wait for his new book every second year, like all the rest of his fans - drat!). This one dealt with a series of murders involving people in the diamond trade, from those who carve diamonds to those who simply bought a diamond engagement ring. It had the typical twists and turns in the plot that I haven't ever seen any other writer pull off better.

And now I'm reading Unsub, by Meg Gardiner. It's about a serial killer who went off the grid for 25 years and then all of a sudden picks back up where he left off, although the lead detective from the first string of murders has retired and now his policewoman daughter has been taken from her drug enforcement duties and assigned to the team trying to track down the killer (a psycho called the Prophet, who carves the symbol of Mercury into his victims). It's the first book I've read by this author and I'm less than a hundred pages in but I'm enjoying it - not so much that I'd necessarily go seek out her other works, but if I see her name on a book at the library book sale I'd probably pick it up.

Johnathan
 

My feeling on Perdido Street Station is pretty much the same. The worldbuilding was phenomenal, but the ending left me feeling profoundly unsatisfied.

The Scar by China Miéville - A good read, with some great worldbuilding, so much so that I'm definitely going to track down Perdido Street Station by the same author, which is the book before this one. However, as much as I liked this second book, with its fascinating world and its multitude of awesome ideas, I kind of wish it had had a stronger ending than it did.
 

KahlessNestor

Explorer
Finished reading Guilt by Accusation: The Challenge of Proving Innocence in the Age of #MeToo by Alan Dershowitz.

Started reading Cowardly Christians by Matt Walsh.

Still reading Victoria: The Queen by Julia Baird.

Almost finished with Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett.
 

Finished:

The Palace Job by Weekes. Fun, but not great. After a point, Loch's "always one step ahead" got a bit contrived, but enjoyable none the less.

A Martian Odyssey by Stanley Weinbaum. Charming, but I was questioning its inclusion in Appendix N...then the reference to Iron Rations showed up, and a creature that assuredly inspired the Xorn.

The Magician Nephew by C.S. Lewis. Re-reading this yet again, I think it's good, but not as great as the greatest in the series. Some things don't need to be explained.

Now I am onto reading Rachel Aaron's Minimum Wage Magic.
 

Celebrim

Legend
My feeling on Perdido Street Station is pretty much the same. The worldbuilding was phenomenal, but the ending left me feeling profoundly unsatisfied.
I feel all the adulation heaped on China has really hurt his writing. Most authors get better over time. China I feel peaked with King Rat.
 

Yeah, that can certainly happen. One wonders if A Song of Ice and Fire would be done (or at least, closer to the end!) if it had never become the massive phenomenon that it did.

Perdido Street Station was my introduction to Mieville, and remained the only book of his I've read. I wanted to like it very much, but yeah, it felt like it was too many things crammed into one sack, and it all just ended up ripping at the end.

I feel all the adulation heaped on China has really hurt his writing. Most authors get better over time. China I feel peaked with King Rat.
 

Richards

Adventurer
I finished Unsub and while it was okay, it was ultimately unsatisfying - not only were there some unbelievable aspects to it (it's one thing for a housewife to have the presence of mind to blink a message in Morse code while being filmed by the killer, but to be able to do so while engaging in a letter-shifting cipher? - not likely), but the ending revealed a big, fat, open-ended question that was apparently just plopped there so the author could crank out a sequel. No thank you.

So now I'm back to Jeffery Deaver, this time his novel The Sleeping Doll featuring Kathryn Dance, a California Bureau of Intelligence kinesics specialist (the study of body language) up against an escaped killer in the same mold as Charles Manson. The title refers to the one surviving member of a family he killed, a young daughter overlooked in a pile of stuffed animals and dolls she had in bed with her at the time of the killings. It's been great so far, and as this is written by one of my most trusted thriller authors I don't expect the rest of it to go otherwise.

Johnathan
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Reading Charles Stross’ Accelerando and appreciating it. Not much character devlopment, but the near future ideas from 2005 (just before the first iphone) are still astonishing. 33% through. We’ll see how the back 2/3 goes.
 

KahlessNestor

Explorer
Still reading Victoria: The Queen by Julie Baird.

Still reading Cowardly Christians by Matt Walsh.

Finished Wintersmith by Terry Pratchett and picked up his next book, Making Money.
 

Finished:

Aaron's Minimum Wage Magic - enjoyable, but held back by feeling like Shadowrun with the serial numbers filed off. If you told me this was based on someone's Shadowrun campaign, I would 100% believe it.

Harrison's The Arm of the Law - short, at just 26 pages. It's a cynical and humorous take on what happens when a robot cop arrives at a quiet, semi-corrupt police station on Mars.

I am now re-reading The Fellowship of the Ring. It's been almost four years since I last read it, so it's about time.
 

Most Liked Threads

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top