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What are you reading this year 2020?

Richards

Adventurer
I'm taking a break from Jeffery Deaver mysteries (although I have a few more of those in my hopper) to try out China Miéville's "The Scar." I've heard really good things about his novels but have never read anything by him; when I saw this book at the library book sale for fifty cents I decided to give it a whirl. I'm not very far in but it's already intriguing. I can tell the author's a world-builder along the lines of Scott Lynch and his "Locke Lamora" series - and while so far I've enjoyed Lynch's works much better, I admittedly have seen much more of his world-building than I have of Miéville's. So we'll see.

Johnathan
 

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KahlessNestor

Explorer
Finished Terry Pratchett's Thud! and am now on to his book Wintersmith.

Still reading Julie Baird's biography Victoria: The Queen.

Started reading Guilt by Accusation: The Challenge of Proving Innocence in the Age of #MeToo by Alan Dershowitz.
 


Nellisir

Adventurer
I started book 1 of The Expanse a couple days ago. it's good.
Gets better.

I read The Red Pavilion, a Judge Dee mystery, last night. I'm having trouble articulating exactly what I like about these books, but part of it is "RPG-ness" of them all. Each character is a distinct NPC, and nearly every book seems like it could be adapted into an RPG adventure with minimum effort. The clear winners in this book were the muscular Crab and his friend, the hunchbacked Shrimp, two simple members of the lower class who live quietly in their little shack and grow pumpkins. There's a hilarious passage where Judge's Dee's associate Ma Joong (a reformed bandit) find Crab & Shrimp have taken calmly possession of the cook stove in the kitchen of Dee's lodging house and Crab is teaching Shrimp proper technique for flipping an egg in the frying pan (it's the wrist.)
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I'm taking a break from Jeffery Deaver mysteries (although I have a few more of those in my hopper) to try out China Miéville's "The Scar." I've heard really good things about his novels but have never read anything by him; when I saw this book at the library book sale for fifty cents I decided to give it a whirl. I'm not very far in but it's already intriguing. I can tell the author's a world-builder along the lines of Scott Lynch and his "Locke Lamora" series - and while so far I've enjoyed Lynch's works much better, I admittedly have seen much more of his world-building than I have of Miéville's. So we'll see.

Johnathan
For what it's worth, I would start with Perdido Street Station. It's one of his best. Also the book before the Scar, although they stand alone and I don't think there are any overlapping characters. Or if they are, they are minor in one or the other.
 

univoxs

That's my dog, Walter
Supporter
More C.J. Cherryh always. I am in the middle of re-reading Cyteen. I am going to read a bunch of Dune this year in prep of the "Most Anticipated Game" I am being a bit ridiculous about re-reading dune. I don't have a copy of the first book and have a thing about buying a new copy of a book that was printed so many times. I will wait to get my hands on a used copy, regardless of condition. As my table is playing WFRP 4e like mad I have been trying to read the WF novels and so far, they have not been great. The first Genevive book was okay.
 

The Warhammer Fantasy novels that I've read have been a mixed bag, like most RPG fiction. Kim Newman's Genevieve is indeed just okay (His Anno Dracula, not Warhammer at all, is quite fun, however).

I enjoyed Gav Thorpe's The Doom of Dragonback a fair bit, and would recommend that for fans of dwarves and Warhammer Fantasy. Some of the Gotrek and Felix books are good, but some are pretty rote.

As my table is playing WFRP 4e like mad I have been trying to read the WF novels and so far, they have not been great. The first Genevive book was okay.
 

univoxs

That's my dog, Walter
Supporter
The Warhammer Fantasy novels that I've read have been a mixed bag, like most RPG fiction. Kim Newman's Genevieve is indeed just okay (His Anno Dracula, not Warhammer at all, is quite fun, however).

I enjoyed Gav Thorpe's The Doom of Dragonback a fair bit, and would recommend that for fans of dwarves and Warhammer Fantasy. Some of the Gotrek and Felix books are good, but some are pretty rote.
My reasons for wanting to read them were that I never played WFRP before, or the wargames, or the videos games. I only knew the lore from the WFRP Core book. Seeing as I was about to run the game, I wanted to have all the lore in my back pocket, know the world off the top of my head to properly invoke the themes. I have sort of boiled down "Grim and Perilous" for myself in the end. I randomly picked up The Dead and the Damned and its fun in the way you could easily use it as a sourcebook for a party of adventurer's to run through the same events. I don't expect a shared world with a game attached to produce amazing writing, I've read enough Dragonlance and Star Wars books to know that. But there is room for it; Thieves World is a great example. I would love to play that old game as well.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
More C.J. Cherryh always. I am in the middle of re-reading Cyteen.
Cherryh is the best.
I seriously considered buying up all the Invader series at the used book store yesterday. The Chanur books were my favorite.
Never read her fantasy though - Gate of Ivrel etc. Has anyone else?
 

univoxs

That's my dog, Walter
Supporter
Cherryh is the best.
I seriously considered buying up all the Invader series at the used book store yesterday. The Chanur books were my favorite.
Never read her fantasy though - Gate of Ivrel etc. Has anyone else?
Foreigner Book 20 just came out as well as a new Alliance Union book this year. Both are right on the money as always. I have read almost everything she has written and yes go read Morgan Saga that Gate of Ivrel is in. Its her first an awesome blend of SciFi Fantasy. Its one of those far future ideas where humanity is scattered and regressed to more ancient systems of culture and tech.

The thing she does so well is have you fallow a character that can allow you to explore the world she has created. A master world builder.

Her fantasy series Rusalka is unique and unlike any other fantasy out there. The Fortress series hues a little closer to typical sword and sorcerery. Paladin is another unique book and I would almost call it alternate asian history over fantasy. The Ealdwood books are more folklore and fairy in tradition but quick reads as the books are short.
 

Just finished Harrison's Deathworld. It was surprisingly gripping and sharply written. Not groundbreaking sci-fi, but it certainly held up 60 years later.

Now I'm off to re-read Leiber's Swords in the Mist. Finally got that back from my brother.
 

Richards

Adventurer
For what it's worth, I would start with Perdido Street Station. It's one of his best. Also the book before the Scar, although they stand alone and I don't think there are any overlapping characters. Or if they are, they are minor in one or the other.
Well, it's too late for that - I'm 400+ pages into "The Scar." Had I found "Perdido Street Station" first I'd probably have picked it up, as I purchased it on name recognition and having recalled reading (here, actually) several people enthusing how good an author he was. But never fear: I'm enjoying this book enough that I'll probably hunt up "Perdido Street Station" at some point in the near future.

Johnathan
 


I finished Kothar and the Wizard Slayer, and with it the whole of the Kothar series. For being dated and either a Conan rip-off or satire, it was a lot of fun.

Now I'm trying out some old school sci-fi with Harry Harrison's Deathworld.
The way i see it there is no such thing as good stories becoming dated. If it was good I'll bet 20 years later when your kid reads it he'll be thinking huh...old but good just like you. Beowulf never gets old. Ive found the same is true of newer but still good stories that are none the less older than a lot of stories these days.
 
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Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
The way i see it there is no such thing as good stories becoming dated.
I don't actually agree. Many stories from the early to mid 20th century are quite racist and/or sexist. There's so much good stuff coming out now, I don't find any reason to go back and read those older books and force myself to ignore those aspects.
 

I don't actually agree. Many stories from the early to mid 20th century are quite racist and/or sexist. There's so much good stuff coming out now, I don't find any reason to go back and read those older books and force myself to ignore those aspects.
With most of those situations its a bit like tom sawyer. There is racism. But the author included it because it was authentic to the time. Not because he hated black people. For me its a plus. Not because i support racism, but because it can be a part of making a story believeable which is often times part of making it good. The world is dark.

But thats my preference. We all have our preferences. I am sure you have good reasons for yours.

Ps - also of course some people are just being racist. That happens too. Cant be helped.
 

univoxs

That's my dog, Walter
Supporter
I'm not seeing all that much love for Malazan books. I only do them as audio. You think there would be a game out for it by now too, especially seeing as it was born orignally from the author learning to play AD&D.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
With most of those situations its a bit like tom sawyer. There is racism. But the author included it because it was authentic to the time. Not because he hated black people. For me its a plus. Not because i support racism, but because it can be a part of making a story believeable which is often times part of making it good. The world is dark.

But thats my preference. We all have our preferences. I am sure you have good reasons for yours.

Ps - also of course some people are just being racist. That happens too. Cant be helped.
The sexism bothers me more than the racism; I find it both more overt and more common.
 

Nellisir

Adventurer
Foreigner Book 20 just came out as well as a new Alliance Union book this year. Both are right on the money as always. I have read almost everything she has written and yes go read Morgan Saga that Gate of Ivrel is in. Its her first an awesome blend of SciFi Fantasy. Its one of those far future ideas where humanity is scattered and regressed to more ancient systems of culture and tech.

The thing she does so well is have you fallow a character that can allow you to explore the world she has created. A master world builder.

Her fantasy series Rusalka is unique and unlike any other fantasy out there. The Fortress series hues a little closer to typical sword and sorcerery. Paladin is another unique book and I would almost call it alternate asian history over fantasy. The Ealdwood books are more folklore and fairy in tradition but quick reads as the books are short.
What's the Alliance Union book?
I just reread the Cyteen sequel last year; still have to go back and reread Cyteen itself.
I've read almost all* of her SF and love it. I have a harder time with the fantasy. Paladin I did really enjoy; and the Morgaine Cycle is awesome, but I just couldn't parse the first Fortress book and Rusalka didn't draw me in. I'm going to try the Fortress books again though.

*I read the first three or four Foreigner trilogies and then quit, so I'm not up on those.
 

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