D&D General What did you think of the Stranger Things D&D game?


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The DM did the narrative scene setting very well. Better than I could. However, this could be put down to them being a professional actor in real life!
 

Conflict

First Post
Well, i did not watch last season but dnd is much more combat oriented. Different systems would be so much better for games like Stranger Things. Little Fears system could be nice even World of Darkness could be great (without any vampires, hunters, werewlves etc but just pure setting details)
 

bedir than

Full Moon Storyteller
Well, i did not watch last season but dnd is much more combat oriented. Different systems would be so much better for games like Stranger Things. Little Fears system could be nice even World of Darkness could be great (without any vampires, hunters, werewlves etc but just pure setting details)
The characters in the show play D&D, in the 80s
 

They probably had the same colloquial use of probabilities as the Russian gulag guard, (one in 50, one in 100) but it's jarirng because it's a dice and we can actually calculate them.
 

Steampunkette

Rules Tinkerer and Freelance Writer
Supporter
A half-elf thief is an AD&D character. They would need a 14 or higher to hit AC 0, and a 20 to hit a -6 or better.

(A half-elf thief somehow made with the OD&D supplements and so on would have about the same THACO).

Not that it really matters for this.
AD&D was released in 1978 and they're playing in 1986. It's almost certain they were doing AD&D 1e. Which in turn alleviates my concern because the attack matrixes I was remembering were from the AD&D DMG and referred to NPC Half Elves using the Elf Matrix, I'd simply forgotten which book had what and crossed my wires on which table goes where...

I really wish I could Defrag my Brain.

Or just delete useless information like THAC0 tables...
 

The inclusion of "D&D" in the show had absolutely nothing to do with promotion of D&D as a game, nor demonstrating the geek cred of anyone behind the scenes. The purpose of it being there was to provide support for why the KIDS were not only able to accept what was happening as being REAL, but able to reason out how this "unreality" actually worked, at least to a sufficient enough degree to address it where adults were failing. In that, I think it was a brilliant concept and well-executed. The actual "rules" they were using for D&D is very irrelevant.
 

renbot

Adventurer
The DM did the narrative scene setting very well. Better than I could. However, this could be put down to them being a professional actor in real life!
And having an army of writers, and multiple takes, and filming the same scene several times from different angles, and and and...

I'm just glad that my players don't expect that level of drama and polish when I'm sitting in a friend's living room bloated on pizza, Swedish fish, and Diet Coke (yes, I see the irony, but I try not to drink calories) with a dozen things battling it out in my overworked DM brain.

But yeah, I freakin' LOVED that scene. Loved it. Everything about it.
 

Laurefindel

Legend
The throwing of multiple different dice at once was jarring to me, but moreso because I was worried they were going to knock over the minifigures.
Which they did at one point toward the end. Didn't notice which mini got knock down, and whether it corresponded to that player's character.
 

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