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What GOOD things are industry icons doing?

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
Seems like over the past year, many icons in the industry are doing really awful things (Ernie Jr, TSR3, Adam Koebel) or being caught in scandal (Luke Gygax, Luke Crane--what's up people named Luke?, Larry Elmore, Jeff Ward).

Naturally based on human nature we tend to focus on those. But what are some of the good things industry icons are doing? I want to focus more on that. Like Peter Atkinson making GenCon more welcoming.
 

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Retreater

Legend
Maybe it's a case of "no news is good news?"
Like if they are running a business successfully, creating product we enjoy, paying their employees, and staying out of controversy, maybe that's a good thing?
We can see trends of more diverse voices in the RPG industry: Paizo's "Mwangi Expanse," Legendary Games' "Boricubos," Chaosium's "Harlem Unbound," the successful Kickstarter of "Thirsty Sword Lesbians." I'm sure there are many more examples.
Then you have human interest stories. So many companies from Paizo to Frog God Games to Monte Cook regularly have sales to raise money for charity or members of the community who need fundraising.
 

Seems like over the past year, many icons in the industry are doing really awful things (Ernie Jr, TSR3, Adam Koebel) or being caught in scandal (Luke Gygax, Luke Crane--what's up people named Luke?, Larry Elmore, Jeff Ward).

Naturally based on human nature we tend to focus on those. But what are some of the good things industry icons are doing? I want to focus more on that. Like Peter Atkinson making GenCon more welcoming.

Larry Elmore ???
 

MGibster

Legend
We're kind of stretching the definition of icon, aren't we? Gary Gygax has the distinction of being the face of D&D appearing on such nationally broadcast programs like 60 Minutes. I think it's safe to say Gary was an icon but I'm not quite convinced the same is true of Luke, Ernie, or TSR 3. I'm not even sure most gamers heard of Luke or Ernie before this past summer's series of unfortunate blunders.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
Larry Elmore ???
Larry's a good guy, but he got caught up in the Dinehart/Giantlands/Wunderfiled (sic) fiasco, and continues to do work for them while people like Jeff Dee, when this all came out, pulled out in a hurry and wanted nothing to do with them.
 

Tun Kai Poh

Adventurer
Never mind about icons, but the small ttrpg creators on itch.io have banded together repeatedly to contribute to massive charity bundles, like the Bundle for Racial Justice and Equality, and the more recent fundraising bundle for aid to Palestine.

Look not to the heights, but to the trenches, where the little guys are.
 

Hex08

Explorer
Who are the modern industry icons? I don't keep up on this much in recent years but back in my D&D 3.0/3.5 days Monte Cook was probably an icon of the industry and I loved what he did with a lot of his Malhavok Press stuff and his current Monte Cook Games seems to be doing well.
 

billd91

Hobbit on Quest (he/him)
Celebrity-elevating culture sucks - even when that person is celebrated within a relatively small, niche field like RPGs. Put them up on a pedestal too much and you're tremendously disappointed when they, inevitably, slip up somewhere or you find they aren't a saint, just a person who did something really well and maybe has a few warts along with their achievements.

That said, there are some things you really do have to shake your head at. All you can do is just hope that it doesn't reflect the totality of their character and that they learn something from their failures.
 

Maybe it's a case of "no news is good news?"
Like if they are running a business successfully, creating product we enjoy, paying their employees, and staying out of controversy, maybe that's a good thing?
We can see trends of more diverse voices in the RPG industry: Paizo's "Mwangi Expanse," Legendary Games' "Boricubos," Chaosium's "Harlem Unbound," the successful Kickstarter of "Thirsty Sword Lesbians." I'm sure there are many more examples.
Then you have human interest stories. So many companies from Paizo to Frog God Games to Monte Cook regularly have sales to raise money for charity or members of the community who need fundraising.
content-wise Paizo seems to be doing some good stuff, but I'm not sure they are a model of industry ethics right now, at least in terms of how they are run as a business...
 

Argyle King

Legend
Steve Jackson (of SJ Games) continues to support The Electronic Frontier Foundation.

He's also typically good-natured to interact with and genuinely seems to still enjoy gaming.
 





Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Seems like over the past year, many icons in the industry are doing really awful things (Ernie Jr, TSR3, Adam Koebel) or being caught in scandal (Luke Gygax, Luke Crane--what's up people named Luke?, Larry Elmore, Jeff Ward).

Naturally based on human nature we tend to focus on those. But what are some of the good things industry icons are doing? I want to focus more on that. Like Peter Atkinson making GenCon more welcoming.

There's people I'd like to list, but I almost feel like I'd be jinxing them at this point. How many times recently has there been a celebrity who was known as a "good guy" in the news for being a ... not-so-good guy.

Just leave me Tom Hanks. Please!
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
There's people I'd like to list, but I almost feel like I'd be jinxing them at this point. How many times recently has there been a celebrity who was known as a "good guy" in the news for being a ... not-so-good guy.

Just leave me Tom Hanks. Please!
Tom Hanks has been in reverse it seems. With Bosom Buddies (with arguably anti-trans themes) and Mazes and Monsters, his career has continuing been improving on the scale of "good guy" from where it started with problematic roles (which I do not blame him for at all; struggling young actors gonna take roles, especially in the 70s and 80s when those things were largely viewed as acceptable for the time)
 

Retreater

Legend
There's people I'd like to list, but I almost feel like I'd be jinxing them at this point. How many times recently has there been a celebrity who was known as a "good guy" in the news for being a ... not-so-good guy.

Just leave me Tom Hanks. Please!
The problem is that most of us are human, and we have failings. No one can maintain the curated image forever and at all times.
"'So-and-so' is a funny guy." But then you find out he suffers from depression.
"'So-and-so' maintains a wholesome image in a TV show." But then you find out that she has a sexual identity apart from the TV show.
We're all jerks sometimes. We all fail to live up to the standards we'd like to display all the time.
If we actually had realistic standards for celebrities, I think we wouldn't be disappointed in them as often.
 

There's people I'd like to list, but I almost feel like I'd be jinxing them at this point. How many times recently has there been a celebrity who was known as a "good guy" in the news for being a ... not-so-good guy.

Just leave me Tom Hanks. Please!
You either die a hero or live long enough to become the villain...
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
"'So-and-so' is a funny guy." But then you find out he suffers from depression.
"'So-and-so' maintains a wholesome image in a TV show." But then you find out that she has a sexual identity apart from the TV show.
We're all jerks sometimes.

So, your examples are... not good. I mean, having depression or an unexpected sexual/gender identity does not make you a jerk.
 

Retreater

Legend
So, your examples are... not good. I mean, having depression or an unexpected sexual/gender identity does not make you a jerk.
You clipped the second sentence, which is what applied to my examples.
So yes, we're all jerks sometimes. That's blanketed to everyone.
The examples I gave illustrate the "fail to live up to the standards" of a curated image.
 

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