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D&D 5E What is the future of the forgotten realms?

ECMO3

Hero
Between 2014 and March 2019 there were I believe 12 5E adventures published by WOTC that were set in the forgotten realms, including LMOP and DOIP. They started to scale back in 2020 and 2021 with only one published each of those years (ROFM, CKM).

Now it seems there is no forgotten realms adventure that is going to be published in the next year.

Is WOTC planning to scale back or abandon the Forgotten Realms setting?
 

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Between 2014 and March 2019 there were I believe 12 5E adventures published by WOTC that were set in the forgotten realms, including LMOP and DOIP. They started to scale back in 2020 and 2021 with only one published each of those years (ROFM, CKM).

Now it seems there is no forgotten realms adventure that is going to be published in the next year.

Is WOTC planning to scale back or abandon the Forgotten Realms setting?
Do you have some inside info on the likely September adventure release?
 

ECMO3

Hero
Do you have some inside info on the likely September adventure release?
No. But that is 11 months away (I guess I was slightly off when I said 1 year) and even if that is forgotten realms, that will be by far the longest time (18 months) without a Forgotten Realms adventure since 5E started.
 


tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
Is WOTC planning to scale back or abandon the Forgotten Realms setting?
kill-it-with-fire-kill-it-with-fire.gif
 

Forgotten Realms is the most remembered D&D setting. It is the most famous thanks the videogames Baldur's Gate and Newerwinter Nights. My doubts are about the possible spin-off: Kara-Tur, al-Qadim and Maztica, because now the audence has got a different sensibility. Other question is the possible retcon of the crystal sphere, to can add new elements.
 


Mercurius

Legend
I think it is mostly a matter of perception, based on a couple factors. For one, the increase in yearly books from 3 (2015-17) to 4 (2018-20) to 5 (2021), and potentially 6 or more eventually. The only really "Realms-dominant" period was 2014-15, with the single adventure of '14 being a two-parter in the Realms, and then all three books in 2015 set in the Realms.

Since 2016, only one year had more than a single Realms book, that being the two Waterdeep books in 2018. But then the book count went up 4 and then 5 this year. So while there's still one Realms book this year, it accounts for 20% of product, compared to 25-50%, depending on the year. But again, not really fewer books than most years.

Anyhow, I've speculated that they're going to be spreading their wings a bit, especially once more of the classic settings come out. It might be really hard to do Planescape, Dark Sun and Dragonlance without some further support, unless the "new format" for these are some kind of mega box sets or slip-cases with multiple volumes.

But I don't think they're going to abandon the Realms anytime soon. In fact, I think it will continue to be "homebase," even as they diversify D&D into other worlds and types of stories. My guess is that we'll still see one Realms product each year, mostly an adventure, but maybe eventually a setting book (in 2024?).

And again, we're going to be getting at least 5 books a year going forward, possibly more. If there are six books, only one for the Realms, that's 16.7% of books set in the Realms--half the percentage of 2016-17, but the same amount of books.
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
I think it is mostly a matter of perception, based on a couple factors. For one, the increase in yearly books from 3 (2015-17) to 4 (2018-20) to 5 (2021), and potentially 6 or more eventually. The only really "Realms-dominant" period was 2014-15, with the single adventure of '14 being a two-parter in the Realms, and then all three books in 2015 set in the Realms.

Since 2016, only one year had more than a single Realms book, that being the two Waterdeep books in 2018. But then the book count went up 4 and then 5 this year. So while there's still one Realms book this year, it accounts for 20% of product, compared to 25-50%, depending on the year. But again, not really fewer books than most years.

Anyhow, I've speculated that they're going to be spreading their wings a bit, especially once more of the classic settings come out. It might be really hard to do Planescape, Dark Sun and Dragonlance without some further support, unless the "new format" for these are some kind of mega box sets or slip-cases with multiple volumes.

But I don't think they're going to abandon the Realms anytime soon. In fact, I think it will continue to be "homebase," even as they diversify D&D into other worlds and types of stories. My guess is that we'll still see one Realms product each year, mostly an adventure, but maybe eventually a setting book (in 2024?).

And again, we're going to be getting at least 5 books a year going forward, possibly more. If there are six books, only one for the Realms, that's 16.7% of books set in the Realms--half the percentage of 2016-17, but the same amount of books.
They night not abandon it & I suspect probably wont, but I doubt that they will even consider thinking about the mechanical changes to the core rules that would be required to make anything else more than fr with a paint job pretending its something else.
 

Mercurius

Legend
They night not abandon it & I suspect probably wont, but I doubt that they will even consider thinking about the mechanical changes to the core rules that would be required to make anything else more than fr with a paint job pretending its something else.
I'm not really sure what you're saying. They've already published a couple settings that are different enough to the Realms, and required minimal new rules, and they're publishing several classic settings--and probably another Magic plane and up to new settings--before the revised rules come out. The point being, I think the 5E rules as-is can accommodate a range of settings.

Or maybe I'm misunderstanding?
 


Mercurius

Legend
Elminster appeared in my kitchen last night and told me that he had personally advised WOTC to step back from the tired old Realms setting, and focus on Greyhawk and Dark Sun because they’re far more interesting and exciting.
Hopefully that also means that he's made an appearance at the WotC offices in an attempt to convince them to dial back the Realms to the gray box version, for the "revisited" product in 2024.
 

GuyBoy

Adventurer
Hopefully that also means that he's made an appearance at the WotC offices in an attempt to convince them to dial back the Realms to the gray box version, for the "revisited" product in 2024.
Well, he asked me to pack him a Brie and bacon ciabatta before he left, so he was clearly going somewhere....
 

tetrasodium

Legend
Supporter
I'm not really sure what you're saying. They've already published a couple settings that are different enough to the Realms, and required minimal new rules, and they're publishing several classic settings--and probably another Magic plane and up to new settings--before the revised rules come out. The point being, I think the 5E rules as-is can accommodate a range of settings.

Or maybe I'm misunderstanding?
Oh they published them... but they didn't change any rules to support the themes and tone of those settings. The closest they were willing to do was a couple more race/class/feat additions to a core system still tuned to epic heroic fantasy. At the core 5e is timed for a specific type of game using 5es baselines and it goes a step further by coding against attempts at small changes away from that.

Heck vrgtr didn't include spell changes or even rest mechanic changes & because they pegged classes to different rest schedules with an encounter budget leagues beyond all but the grindiest grondfests they really cant do that without changing a bunch of classes. Can you imagine darksun with Outlander goodberru create food & water etc and PCs who start at least one with gear that can only be described as pre-cleansing war legendary assortments far beyond what they should ever be able to find on most shops?... I can but not sure how it could be called dark sin or athas as opposed to some random desert in fr.
 


No, WotC are finding room in their schedules to support other settings, but there is loads of FR stuff in the pipeline. In addition to the movie, and inevitable tie-in merchandise, there is the high profile BG3, something going on with the Neverwinter Nights franchise, another Salvatore Drizzt book, and we have just had the Extra Life Minsc and Boo book.

I'm glad to see the appearance of non-FR set adventures, and look forward to seeing an Eberron adventure path, and perhaps a Planeswalker adventure connecting Theros and Ravnica.
 
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There is zero chance of WotC abandoning the Forgotten Realms in the run-up to a big-budget hollywood movie set there, and with Baldur's Gate III coming out soon.

Much as I personally would like a redone 400+ page FR campaign setting book to replace SCAG, I reckon after Witchlight we'll be back to the usual story of FR being a vaguely default setting that gets fleshed out in fits and starts, and the usual schedule of the hardback adventures being set there every second half of the year.
 



DEFCON 1

Legend
I suspect the designers at WotC put far less thought and concern about when and where they do material using Faerunian names than all of the rest of us who are watching from the outside. Sure seems like all of us get much more worried or bent out of shape about it than they ever do.
 

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