D&D General Which D&D Words and Things are Post 1608?

Mad_Jack

Hero
Telegraphs begin in 1816, and Eberron has no telephone equivalent.

On a slight tangent, I've always found this to be somewhat hysterical...

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It's fascinating to look back at some of this stuff and realize that a lot of things are either much older or much newer than we think...
(My ACW-era bayonet has a threaded metal screw in it, which I thought was odd until I found out that they date back to 1775 or so...)
 

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Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
It will outdoors, as it allows vision by starlight. (reduced but not eliminated if the sky is cloudy)

Doesn't help indoors unless someone casts Starshine, a 1e Druid spell (I'm not even sure if it's still a thing in 5e) that generates indoor starlight over an area.
Bioluminescent fungus glow underground. It would help explain how there can be whole civilisations in the Underdark
 



Steel_Wind

Legend
"Libram" is just the accusative form of the Latin word libra. It is likely that it was meant to be a derivation of the Latin word liber, which means "book." (The accusative form of liber is librum, which might have been transmuted into "libram" because -um is not a common ending in English words.) Technically, liber also means "free, freedom," but the two etymologies are unrelated, like how "wind" (the thing that blows) and "wind" (the verb for coiling one object around another) are spelled the same but have completely different origins.

Dweomer, at least, is not at all a new invention, though he did revive a word that was nearly dead.
Libram was a scale or balance, or a term of measurement in latin. It's use to refer to it as a book was, as you say, a coined term by Gygax - never in use in latin. The word may have (wrongly) appeared in some thesaurus Gygax plainly used throughout OD&D and AD&D in his witing style.

Dweomer (pronounced Dwim-Mer) was a Middle English word for illusion or magic. That one must have been found in Gygax's thesaurus.
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
On a slight tangent, I've always found this to be somewhat hysterical...


It's fascinating to look back at some of this stuff and realize that a lot of things are either much older or much newer than we think...
(My ACW-era bayonet has a threaded metal screw in it, which I thought was odd until I found out that they date back to 1775 or so...)
Oh yeah I love that stuff.

Like how old cafés are, or how people in the “old west” loved cocktails and bartenders were celebrities, and how Wyatt Earp had a favorite Ice Cream Parlor in Tombstone.

Like actual history is so much more fun than our popular media portrays.
 

Celebrim

Legend
Libram was a scale or balance, or a term of measurement in latin. It's use to refer to it as a book was, as you say, a coined term by Gygax - never in use in latin. The word may have (wrongly) appeared in some thesaurus Gygax plainly used throughout OD&D and AD&D in his witing style.

Dweomer (pronounced Dwim-Mer) was a Middle English word for illusion or magic. That one must have been found in Gygax's thesaurus.

Gygax seems to have consumed a massive amount of pulp fiction and 19th century medieval romances as a youth. I think it's equally likely that he accumulated his vocabulary and neologisms from Appendix N and such.
 


Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
Gygax seems to have consumed a massive amount of pulp fiction and 19th century medieval romances as a youth. I think it's equally likely that he accumulated his vocabulary and neologisms from Appendix N and such.
Dweomer specifically is Old English and refers to Dweorg (dwarf) magic, so yeah probably readings of old norse/anglosaxon legend rather than a thesaurus as such
 


Infravision
I think their point is, Predetetor is science fiction, but infravision is a very real ability possessed by many real world animals. Ultravision too. Bees use it, and many "white" flowers have colours invisible the to humans.

The idea of a "visible spectrum" is human-centric. It's defined by the wavelengths humans can see. There is no reason to suppose anything that isn't human would see the same wavelengths.
 


Azzy

KMF DM
I think their point is, Predetetor is science fiction, but infravision is a very real ability possessed by many real world animals. Ultravision too. Bees use it, and many "white" flowers have colours invisible the to humans.

The idea of a "visible spectrum" is human-centric. It's defined by the wavelengths humans can see. There is no reason to suppose anything that isn't human would see the same wavelengths.
And it still is a lot less fantasy and more scientific than "sees in dark".
 






Hussar

Legend
Funnily enough the word Ranger as associated with being mounted is very close:

ranger (n.)​

late 14c. (early 14c. in surnames), "gamekeeper, sworn officer of a forest whose work is to walk through it and protect it," agent noun from range (v.). Attested from 1590s in the general sense of "a rover, a wanderer;" from 1660s in the sense of "man (often mounted) who polices an area." The elite U.S. combat unit is so called from 1942 (organized 1941).
 

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