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General Anyone ever run (or played in) a campaign with entire party (or almost) was a single class?

cbwjm

I can add a custom title.
I ran a 2e campaign with 2 players who were both invokers, that was a fun though it was a brief campaign. I think we started at level 9 though rather than working our way up from 1st. We did at some point add a couple of henchmen, a fighter and a cleric. Most memorable moment was when one invoker summoned up a wall of fire and caught the other invokers genie in it killing them. May have also caught the other invoker in it.
 

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the Jester

Legend
One of the groups I am currently running includes two druids (different subclasses), one druid/ranger, one monk, and one barbarian, so about half druids. So far, it's going very well- each of the druids plays very differently and takes up a different party role. One is the party crocodile (wild shape), one eats the hearts of their enemies, and the druid/ranger, oddly, is the main party healer.
 


Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
One of the groups I am currently running includes two druids (different subclasses), one druid/ranger, one monk, and one barbarian, so about half druids. So far, it's going very well- each of the druids plays very differently and takes up a different party role. One is the party crocodile (wild shape), one eats the hearts of their enemies, and the druid/ranger, oddly, is the main party healer.
Do they ever get into situations that they can't handle?
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Everyone had 2 levels of Moon Druid and were required to be bears. They could cast in bear form and it was permanent. I don't know why we didn't just play awakened bears, but it is what it is.

The campaign name was Bear Necessities.
If this wasn't a joke, then I have to ask - what was the in-fiction reason they were all bears?
 


Coroc

Hero
The biggest downside of that era is that I have been "chasing the dragon" ever since trying to recapture lightning in a bottle of a similar experience. It was a perfect combination of...

-A grounded main story by the GM to keep us mainly at home instead of globetrotting.

-Enough side plots and mini systems incorporated to keep the temple day to day interesting.

-All 4 players contributing to the story...by write ups, designing buildings, NPCs, or even entire rules subsystems to do the things they were interested in (like a system to make a weekly series of rolls to determine our market share of the temple going crowd).

-Player buy in to create interparty conflict but only in the interest of good story.

One example is the two clerics having an hour long IRL discussion on Torms opinions on putting goblin heads on spikes as a warning to other goblins. This spun out into us exploring two radically different dogmas of thought in the same church. Another subplot later in the campaign was the efforts of two shady characters working for the thives guild taking advantage of my paladins short temper to try to "turn him" into working for their guild instead of against it by putting him in circumstances that forced him to "work their way" as a solution.

A further interesting part of the campaign was that it survived the 3.5 to 4e change , taking place in both systems with minimal interruptions....mostly just making some PCs into NPCs and vice versa.
Yes, you describe it yourself: This adventure might have been glorious even if not all of the party were Torm associates.

And I think that would be the main challenge for a group with many or all players having the same class, to find some adventure supporting that composition.
 


Olrox17

Hero
Actually, yes, back in 3.0. We were all 13th year olds, our very first DnD game. I was the DM.
Every single player (five or six kids) played a human fighter, with the exception of one elf fighter. Named Legolas, of course.
Turned out, nobody bothered to read the spell casting section.
 

While I wasn't directly involved, during the playtest for 5E our FLGS had three groups of us running games at the same time. One group was 5 wizards and a barbarian (the barbarian player joined late), with the concept being that one of the wizard was the professor of a class of four. It was surprisingly effective, even before the barbarian joined the game.
 

Blackrat

He Who Lurks Beyond The Veil
I have been in two campaigns where each character was multiclass with the same base class.

First one was barbarians, where we started at lvl 2, so everyone could build their own marauder. I played a skald, ie. barb/bard.

The second time we played a band, everyone a bard, and I think it took several levels before anyone multiclassed.
 

jasper

Rotten DM
I have DMed a module with all paladins but not a campaign. I think as long as you did not tailor most encounters it would be fun. But I would tailor some encounters so they super heroes, and other encounters where they would be super zeroes.
 

Does 4 out of 5 PCs in a 2E FR campaign being Specialty Priests count? I participated in that once (player rather than DM). We were all SPs of different gods, and a lot of them were kind of class-adjacent, and SPs in the FR were generally great, so it worked pretty well. Didn't last because we got distracted but still. 5th PC was a Halfling Psionicist who was just a wonderful character to have in the party, and the only PC Halfling I've ever seen played for more than a couple of sessions in D&D (that said Halfling sidekick/hireling-types seem to be common in groups I've been in).
 

Merifluous

Explorer
My players decided to play all clerics (just a 4 person party) in 3.5e to punish me after I TPKed them in the previous campaign (my only TPK in 20 years of DMing). It worked. I stupidly decided to make the vampires of Westgate the main villian. The final fight lasted like 2 rounds. That said, we probably reference and talk about that campaign more than any other. It went to 16th level IIRC.
 

the Jester

Legend
Do they ever get into situations that they can't handle?
They haven't yet! Their last session was a real stress test for them, with all of them being 4th or 5th level; they had one encounter that basically lasted the whole session, wherein they fought three vampire spawn, a darkling, two berserkers, and a priest. It was very, very rough, and left most of them pretty much entirely depleted, at only a handful or three of hit points, and with their max hps reduced from the vampires' bites. They still managed to triumph, though- even with a real dearth of magic weapons!
 

DMMike

Game Masticator
Isn't when you tell players what class they must use, the same time they start walking out?

My players decided to play all clerics (just a 4 person party) in 3.5e to punish me after I TPKed them in the previous campaign (my only TPK in 20 years of DMing). It worked. I stupidly decided to make the vampires of Westgate the main villian. The final fight lasted like 2 rounds. That said, we probably reference and talk about that campaign more than any other. It went to 16th level IIRC.
Four clerics spend four turns turning undead.

Holy light blinds everyone, and the vampire lies flat on the floor, unmoving.

It twitches. It casually stands up, and dusts off its fine, tailored dinner jacket. It has one thing to say before it strikes:

"Turn resistance."
 

Undrave

Hero
Actually, yes, back in 3.0. We were all 13th year olds, our very first DnD game. I was the DM.
Every single player (five or six kids) played a human fighter, with the exception of one elf fighter. Named Legolas, of course.
Turned out, nobody bothered to read the spell casting section.
Only TRUE way to play the game! Woot woot!
 

dave2008

Legend
Has anyone ever intentionally or by accident run a game where the majority of the PCs were of a single class?
Almost all of my campaignes are 1/2 to 5/6 fighters. That is just what my players like. There is typical a ranger, rogue, or wizard sprinkled in though.
 

TwoSix

The hero you deserve
Supporter
Isn't when you tell players what class they must use, the same time they start walking out?
I think the assumption would be you pitch the idea the idea first, like (I assume?) people do for most games. Like "My turn to DM is coming up soon, I was thinking of running something a little different, what do you think?"
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I think the assumption would be you pitch the idea the idea first, like (I assume?) people do for most games. Like "My turn to DM is coming up soon, I was thinking of running something a little different, what do you think?"
Right, exactly. Of course I wouldn't force a game like this on my players.

On another aspect of this thread. Folks have mentioned multi-classing. I think I would say that if someone wants to multi-class outside the "core" character class, I would put some restrictions.

  1. There would have to be an in-fiction reason they start the multi-class. For example, if they want to be a wizard, they would have to find a spellbook. I would work with them to provide them with that in-fiction reason; but it might come with a cost or complication :devilish:
  2. They would have to find an in-fiction mentor to train them past 2nd level in the off-class. And learning that other class would take downtime - no levelling in that class mid-adventure.
  3. The multi-class level can never be higher than (or maybe more than half) of the core class level.
Again, these are all rules I'd run past my players first...
 
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