5E Archetypes to add to 5e

Vael

Adventurer
I think that last part varies by culture - In Filipino babaylan tradition, channeling or possession is very much on the table but it depends on the spirit. Though it is not a universal aspect, so we can leave it out if need be.
This is definitely out of my expertise, but this post reminds me that while a lot of DnD archetypes have been covered, that is biased towards western pop fantasy, I'm sure there is plenty of material outside that space.
 

Undrave

Adventurer
So a concept, rather than a real archetype, that I've had in mind ever since the Seeker bellyflopped onto the scene was that of a character who uses a sling to throw seeds that then instantly grow into plants and trees with various auras. They would also have abilities to leave thriving greenery behind them. They would seek out areas where battles, monsters or planar invasion have ruined the natural world and restore them.

Ever watched The Man Who Planted Trees? Kinda like that but with like... a Ranger or something that can fight.

The Ranger would be a good base and I think I might try my hand at a home-brew version.
 
Fighting Man Person.

Magic User.

Anything after that is gravy. Who needs a Core Fore when you have the Nu Two?
Why stop there. You're so close to a classless system, go for the killing blow and allow characters to learn magic and swordplay as skills and you're done!
 

Vael

Adventurer
I was reading Keith Baker's Site, and he mentioned a class that had been considered for Eberron, the Journeyman.

Keith Baker said:
There was another class we considered when we were originally developing Eberron. We called it the Journeyman, but “Everyman” or “Unlikely Hero” would have worked just as well. In pulp stories, you often have a normal person who gets swept up in the adventure and carried along with the heroes. A nosy reporter, a bartender whose bar got burnt down, a spunky kid, a nightclub singer who just happened to be dating the hero. We considered a variation of this for Eberron: the character who is NOT an adventurer, not a warrior or a wizard, but who nonetheless gets caught up and carried along with the adventurers… the Watson to Holmes, or the Xander to Buffy.

The Journeyman would be something of a skill monkey, because the point was that they HAD a normal profession and might be quite good at it. But the main strength of the Journeyman is amazing, pulp-level luck.
One of the reasons I do enjoy Sorcerers so much is that they can play the reluctant adventurer, power is their birthright, but it's not like the other spellcasters that have pursued their power, made it their profession.

And while DnD has always made PCs the heroes, it might be fun to play the Xander, or heck, a Doctor's Companion. I could imagine a DnD campaign with an Artificer and their magical box and a bunch of Journeymen that got caught up in the ride.
 
Why stop there. You're so close to a classless system, go for the killing blow and allow characters to learn magic and swordplay as skills and you're done!
Which explains why D&D has thrived when so many classless RPGs have fallen by the wayside: anyone with experience of classless systems knows that given the choice between magic and martial prowess every player chooses some mixture of both.
 

lowkey13

I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that.
Why stop there. You're so close to a classless system, go for the killing blow and allow characters to learn magic and swordplay as skills and you're done!
What? Of course not.

If there is one thing I have, it is class.
 
Cu was mentioned in the PHB of 2e...
So were a lot of legendary figures, most of which had little in common with the classes they were being called out as representative of.
Magical beauty is a D&D archetype. We see it explicitly in Dryad, Succubus, and other creatures. It is part of the flavor of the Elf, albeit absent from the mechanics, albeit again, it surfaces in the mechanics of the Charismatic Drow and the Charismatic Eladrin.
'cept CHA's not s'posed t'be looks - thus briefly having the 7th COM stat.

But, yes, the archetype is there for female-appearing monsters. And does draw some criticism: it's evidence that D&D is a heteronormative, male-gaze, bastion of abhorrent old-school sexism (as if the reported behavior of D&Ders weren't enough proof).
A PC option would be even more problematic.

Also, magical beauty helps clarify the meaning of Charisma. In some old school traditions, physical beauty corresponded to the Charisma score. However, Charisma is a mental ability, not a physical ability. The 1e UA attempted to emphasize the difference.
OK, you do remember COM. ;)
 

Mister-Kent

Explorer
I was reading Keith Baker's Site, and he mentioned a class that had been considered for Eberron, the Journeyman.



One of the reasons I do enjoy Sorcerers so much is that they can play the reluctant adventurer, power is their birthright, but it's not like the other spellcasters that have pursued their power, made it their profession.

And while DnD has always made PCs the heroes, it might be fun to play the Xander, or heck, a Doctor's Companion. I could imagine a DnD campaign with an Artificer and their magical box and a bunch of Journeymen that got caught up in the ride.
Journeyman sounds interesting! I was just going to say, in Old School Revival circles there were some classes based on Alice or Dorothy, an unexpected hero who perserveres through mostly charm and much good luck - the Journeyman sounds like a matured take on that and could even combine elements.
 

Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
Journeyman sounds interesting! I was just going to say, in Old School Revival circles there were some classes based on Alice or Dorothy, an unexpected hero who perserveres through mostly charm and much good luck - the Journeyman sounds like a matured take on that and could even combine elements.
Ok so I think about the author in Romancing the Stone... I am strange
 

Blue

Orcus on a bad hair day
And while DnD has always made PCs the heroes, it might be fun to play the Xander, or heck, a Doctor's Companion. I could imagine a DnD campaign with an Artificer and their magical box and a bunch of Journeymen that got caught up in the ride.
I've played the sidekick before - actually that was my halfling bard in the last campaign that finished up. Who was loads of fun. It doesn't take a class, or really any mechanical support though it's likely easier to fit in with a support character who makes other characters shine even more.
 

Yaarel

Adventurer
I was reading Keith Baker's Site, and he mentioned a class that had been considered for Eberron, the Journeyman.



One of the reasons I do enjoy Sorcerers so much is that they can play the reluctant adventurer, power is their birthright, but it's not like the other spellcasters that have pursued their power, made it their profession.

And while DnD has always made PCs the heroes, it might be fun to play the Xander, or heck, a Doctor's Companion. I could imagine a DnD campaign with an Artificer and their magical box and a bunch of Journeymen that got caught up in the ride.
What would the stats of the Journeyman be? Is this the classless class?
 

vincegetorix

Jewel of the North
The Journeyman
1d8+Con Hp
Prof: Simple Weapons, Improvised Weapon
Saves: Con, Cha
Skill: 3 of your choice, 2 tools

1: Better Part of Valor: Hide/Disengage as a Bonus Action
Unassuming Defense: Creature have disadvantage when trying to track or spot you. AC is 13+Dex.
Archetype: Beast Handler, Brawler, Scholar
2: Helpful: Bonus Action Help
3: Specialty: double prof with 1 skill and 1 tool
4: ASI
5: Extra Attack
6: Extra ASI
7: Archetype Feature
8: ASI
9: Lucky Dodge: as a reaction roll 1d6, on a 5-6, attack miss.
10: Specialty: double prof with 1 skill and 1 tool
11: Archetype Feature
12: ASI
13: Elusive: Cannot be restrained, speed cannot be less than 10 while conscious.
14: Extra ASI
15: Everlasting Hope: Immune to fear. 1/day, as a reaction when fall under 0, all allies within 30' make a Cha save against DC 15. Fall to 1 HP and gain 5 THP per ally who make the save.
16: ASI
17: Archetype Feature
18: Contagious Success: When succeed on a roll, all allies within 30' gain 1d4 bonus to next roll.
19: ASI
20: Comrade Succor: Ally within 10' can use your skill modifiers when making a roll instead of theirs.
 

Undrave

Adventurer
Can't disagree, but in it's 2-year tenure, the Warlord did not establish itself as a "standard D&D trope" - indeed, given the edition war controversy, it's probably the opposite ... whatever the opposite of a trope would be?
You say that, but if you look at old DnD we had things like followers, noble titles and the Leadership feat. Seems to me like the 'Mundane Leader of Man' is an archetype that was always THERE.

The Warlord simply gave you mechanics that, instead of making you deal with a bunch of random NPCs, made you interact with the other players instead. It gave you actual mechanics to support the concept.

Battlemasters, and to an extant the Mastermind, are vaillant efforts but feel more like one of the MC-like Archetype we've mentionned befoe. Like the Battlemaster and Mastermind are to the Warlord what the Eldritch Knight and Arcane Trickster are to the Wizard... except they didn't print the Warlord.
 

Vael

Adventurer
What would the stats of the Journeyman be? Is this the classless class?
I would imagine that the Journeyman is a little like a Factotum from 3.5 meets the Lucky Feat expanded to a class. The Journeyman has a pool of ... let's call them Luck Points. They can always expend a point to grant advantage on a save, or disadvantage on an attack targeting them. As they level, they can expend Luck points to briefly simulate/replicate abilities of other classes; casting spells, but also gaining Sneak Attack, Channel Divinity, and so on.
 

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