Art in D&D

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Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
I remembered this piece Adobe did on D&D (interviewing Jeremy Crawford) that does a pretty good job in addressing some of the pieces we're talking about for art and diversity.

 

Hussar

Legend
No proofs. I state proofs. There was no "toxic male fandom" back then. Girls were doing what they did and either joined boys in what they were doing or vice versa. By the same token, if Girls were playing doll house are they then of "Toxic female fandom" if the boys did not wish to join and then judged them accordingly? No. Sometimes the two genders met, more often they did not, Mary Gygax, my sister, the Gygax girls, my girlfriends, my mother, my Aunts, they understand what we were dong and none of them had a mind to join in it even though the invites were there. Model train collectors and simulationists of the same time period--predominantly male as well--are now Toxic Males by such standards? Hogwash. They just admired trains and went about demonstrating their admiration for them, just as my sister went about admiring doll houses and built one, or gardens and planted one, or when she saw something in "alternative medicine" when the rest of the family did not. Difference. It makes the world go round if one can accept it as not being 'Toxic'.
Yes, and artists like Andre Norton were writing under a male pen name for absolutely no reason. :uhoh: That's some serious revisionist history going on there.
 

Enrico Poli1

Explorer
Isn't it fun that the female body and its representation has become a political battlefield?

I'm male and proud of it, and I like beautiful feminine women.

Woke feminism, with all its "toxic masculinity" nonsense, is weakening both masculinity and femininity. Yeah, feminism damages women. Bad, very bad.
 

billd91

Hobbit on Quest
Isn't it fun that the female body and its representation has become a political battlefield?

I'm male and proud of it, and I like beautiful feminine women.

Woke feminism, with all its "toxic masculinity" nonsense, is weakening both masculinity and femininity. Yeah, feminism damages women. Bad, very bad.
This sort of masculinity is toxic because it defines the environment for women rather than allowing them to participate in defining it. That‘s why this is a battlefield and exactly why you are on the wrong side of it.
 

Rob Kuntz

Adventurer
Yes, and artists like Andre Norton were writing under a male pen name for absolutely no reason. :uhoh: That's some serious revisionist history going on there.
Yawn. C. L. Moore predated Norton and had no such limitations. You fishing hook has no worm.

220px-Weird_Tales_October_1934.jpg
 

Rob Kuntz

Adventurer
If her gender wasn't an issue, why use initials instead of Catherine Moore? According to the wikipedia article, even her soon-to-be husband thought she was a man when he wrote a fan letter.
The Vagabond, a student-run magazine at Indiana University, published three of her stories when she was a student there. The three short stories, all with a fantasy theme and all credited to "Catherine Moore", appeared in 1930/31.[1] Her first professional sales appeared in pulp magazines beginning in 1933. Her decision to publish under the name "C.L. Moore" stemmed not from a desire to hide her gender, but to keep her employers at Fletcher Trust from knowing that she was working as a writer on the side.
 

Hriston

Adventurer
Yet, and yet, this was clearly labeled by the artist as a halfling.
Well, the artist (or whoever labeled the picture) clearly knows very little about halflings. I mean, straight red hair? Everyone knows halflings have curly brown hair! I think the problem with depictions of halflings in D&D art for some time, if not since the beginning, is the moving away from the way Tolkien described them, which results in their being somewhat unrecognizable.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Well, the artist (or whoever labeled the picture) clearly knows very little about halflings. I mean, straight red hair? Everyone knows halflings have curly brown hair! I think the problem with depictions of halflings in D&D art for some time, if not since the beginning, is the moving away from the way Tolkien described them, which results in their being somewhat unrecognizable.
The 4e halfling was pretty easily recognizeable tbh.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
The Vagabond, a student-run magazine at Indiana University, published three of her stories when she was a student there. The three short stories, all with a fantasy theme and all credited to "Catherine Moore", appeared in 1930/31.[1] Her first professional sales appeared in pulp magazines beginning in 1933. Her decision to publish under the name "C.L. Moore" stemmed not from a desire to hide her gender, but to keep her employers at Fletcher Trust from knowing that she was working as a writer on the side.
There is a long, long history of women being discriminated against in fields that they aren't "supposed to" be in. Pointing out one exception to the general rule doesn't change that.

Beyond that, this is getting into territory not appropriate for this forum.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
The 4e halfling was pretty easily recognizeable tbh.
I actually have some sympathy for artists trying to do halflings for D&D. The furry barefoot look is Tolkien's hobbits which only sort of describes halflings.

I mean, take a look at this picture. What race is this? If it wasn't labeled halfling I wouldn't know what race it was. The ears are ever-so-slightly pointy, but within the realm of half-elf or even human. There's just no one thing that distinguishes them other than being small.

Halfling2.jpg
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
I actually have some sympathy for artists trying to do halflings for D&D. The furry barefoot look is Tolkien's hobbits which only sort of describes halflings.

I mean, take a look at this picture. What race is this? If it wasn't labeled halfling I wouldn't know what race it was. The ears are ever-so-slightly pointy, but within the realm of half-elf or even human. There's just no one thing that distinguishes them other than being small.

View attachment 116464
Ya know what tho, in the context of playing 4e and being familiar with the art, I never had any trouble seeing an image while skimming thru a book and knowing it’s a halfling.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
Ya know what tho, in the context of playing 4e and being familiar with the art, I never had any trouble seeing an image while skimming thru a book and knowing it’s a halfling.
I guess the image I posted just doesn't scream "halfling" if I saw it out of context. On the other hand, I'm not sure how much it matters. It's more just an observation that most other races have a distinguishing look and feel to them that's lacking in halflings.

On the other hand I prefer 4E's depictions over 5E's which is done in an exaggerated style that doesn't seem to match the rest of the book.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
I guess the image I posted just doesn't scream "halfling" if I saw it out of context. On the other hand, I'm not sure how much it matters. It's more just an observation that most other races have a distinguishing look and feel to them that's lacking in halflings.

On the other hand I prefer 4E's depictions over 5E's which is done in an exaggerated style that doesn't seem to match the rest of the book.
Yeah, the way halflings stand out in 5e is just...not great.
 

Urriak Uruk

Debate fuels my Fire
Isn't it fun that the female body and its representation has become a political battlefield?

I'm male and proud of it, and I like beautiful feminine women.

Woke feminism, with all its "toxic masculinity" nonsense, is weakening both masculinity and femininity. Yeah, feminism damages women. Bad, very bad.
Surely this crosses one of the rules on politics... there isn't a single word about D&D here....
 
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