D&D 5E Barding for War Dogs; 6000gp for Plate Barding???

Layne F

Villager
The rules state that "barding is four times that of similar armor for humanoids". Period. But what about for a dog? While I agree that it would take considerable time to craft such armor, the materials needed would be considerably less than that for a medium humanoid. Yes, it might be difficult to find someone willing to do such an armor in small or medium towns, but any large city or castle would probably have an armorer who makes such for the dogs of the Lord or City. Regardless, the 4x multiplier for all barding seems to be a simplistic rule, specifically for horses. Otherwise, Barding for an elephant would be the same as for a horse. Thoughts?
 

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Oofta

Legend
I'd base it on size of the creature wearing the armor. As a house rule if someone wanted puppy armor it would probably be the same cost as regular.
 

J.Quondam

CR 1/8
The armor rules for 3e were a bit more involved that 5e, but might offer a starting point for you.
Here's the 3e table for "Armor for unusual creatures":

Screenshot 2022-10-04 12.22.43.png


Note that the values for armor "Large" "non-humanoid" creatures are x4/x2, just like barding for large animals like horses in 5e. So you could use this table to guide you in assigning 5e costs/weights, depending upon the size of the creature you need barding for.
 

Ancalagon

Dusty Dragon
Now I know that today pets are beloved, but ... people were a bit utilitarian back then. Would it make sense to pay 6000 gp to armor up an animal that cost a small fraction of it?

(... why can't I find the price for a war dog in the phb?)
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
Problem 1: There is nothing to ever spend money on in 5e. Money is useless!

Problem 2: They really need to make things cheaper.

I kid, kind of. I think you already have your answer-

Elephants only. War elephants. Might be a bit of a tight fit in some dungeons, but so ... much ... fun.

Second option, if you're in a lot of small dungeons?

giphy.gif
 

RoughCoronet0

Dragon Lover
Now I know that today pets are beloved, but ... people were a bit utilitarian back then. Would it make sense to pay 6000 gp to armor up an animal that cost a small fraction of it?

(... why can't I find the price for a war dog in the phb?)
Mastiffs are 25 gp according to the phb
 

DND_Reborn

The High Aldwin
The rules state that "barding is four times that of similar armor for humanoids". Period. But what about for a dog? While I agree that it would take considerable time to craft such armor, the materials needed would be considerably less than that for a medium humanoid. Yes, it might be difficult to find someone willing to do such an armor in small or medium towns, but any large city or castle would probably have an armorer who makes such for the dogs of the Lord or City. Regardless, the 4x multiplier for all barding seems to be a simplistic rule, specifically for horses. Otherwise, Barding for an elephant would be the same as for a horse. Thoughts?
IMO the x4 for "horses" and other steeds would be for large creatures, which are twice the size of medium (roughly) or 4 x the surface area.

Consequently, I would go with something like this:
1664909912151.png


You can round to 5's if you want easy numbers x5, x10, x15 instead of x4, x9, x16.

But, to answer your question, it would then depend on the size of the dog. Most dogs would be considered small creatures IMO, although larger breeds could be medium certainly, such as the mastiff.
 

I'm reminded of the time I let the barbarian buy an elephant. In a campaign set in a fantasy equivalent of Renaissance Venice. They were still at low levels, so that elephant (named Stompy) would oftentimes do more damage then any one PC in the party. After a while I started telling him that some canals were just too narrow for Stompy to fit through.

In hindsight, I probably should've just used that DM tool known as "no."

Problem 1: There is nothing to ever spend money on in 5e. Money is useless!

Problem 2: They really need to make things cheaper.

I kid, kind of. I think you already have your answer-

Elephants only. War elephants. Might be a bit of a tight fit in some dungeons, but so ... much ... fun.

Second option, if you're in a lot of small dungeons?

giphy.gif

As for plate mail barding for a dog, considering how much I've spent on vet bills for my pets over the years, 6,000 gp sounds about right...

In all seriousness, that does seem a bit high, though I might also point out that despite requiring fewer materials, dog-barding is also well outside the realm of what an armorer normally makes. It's likely going to require an entirely custom piece of armor.
 

Dave Goff

Explorer
I remember when I worked in the pet industry hearing that adult, active dogs can carry no more than 25% of their weight without risking injury. In my mind, it's pushing things to even consider having a fully armored Halfling on a dog for any period of time, and then to add plate armor as well? That seems... unlikely.
But hey, I'm no expert and more importantly, it's a fantasy game, have fun! :)
 

For ruling I don’t know,
I can just imagine a dwarf blacksmith receiving the inquiry and negotiating the price with the party. A must for a funny session!
 

Oofta

Legend
I remember when I worked in the pet industry hearing that adult, active dogs can carry no more than 25% of their weight without risking injury. In my mind, it's pushing things to even consider having a fully armored Halfling on a dog for any period of time, and then to add plate armor as well? That seems... unlikely.
But hey, I'm no expert and more importantly, it's a fantasy game, have fun! :)
Dogs wearing armor has a long history. In fact some still wear it today:
330px-Working_dog_in_Afghanistan,_wearing_a_bulletproof_vest,_being_trained-hires.jpg


Riding a dog is a different story, their spines aren't made for it. Then again we're talking halflings and gnomes so maybe?
 

Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
When we were kids (2- 5) we use to ride our dads hunting dogs, though admittedly we werent wearing armour or going long distances. But we can assume 30 odd lbs (which sorta confirms your 25% measure for a 120lb dog)

an English mastiff can go 200 - 230lbs which would allow a weight of 50 - 60lbs - the average Halfling is 40 lb (plus 20lb armour)

the largest known dog weighed 357 lb - which allows a rider of 90 lbs = two halflings. We should probably assume that in a world where riding dogs is common, they are deliberately bred to be larger and stronger to accomodate
 





Now I know that today pets are beloved, but ... people were a bit utilitarian back then. Would it make sense to pay 6000 gp to armor up an animal that cost a small fraction of it?
Even someone who doesn't care about the life of their mount can care about not having their mount shot out from under them mid-battle, tournament, whatever. This goes double for the adventurer who often has a long walk back to civilization.

And it's not just armor for one dog, it's armor for all the dogs that (unless it is a beastmaster companion, a sidekick-classed dog, or otherwise gaining hp as you level up, or else has the divine protection of a DM unwilling to kill your dog) will inevitably replace it when it dies.
 



Dave Goff

Explorer
Dogs wearing armor has a long history. In fact some still wear it today:
View attachment 263207

Riding a dog is a different story, their spines aren't made for it. Then again we're talking halflings and gnomes so maybe?
Well, sure, but that doesn't look like heavy plate and there's no rider. :)
But like I said, I'm definitely no expert and haven't really looked into it.
 

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