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Besides D&D, what are you playing?


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pemerton

Legend
We are still enjoying Dungeon World. I'm not quite sure how the cleric's divine guidance and petitions of their god work though.
From pp 92-93:

Choose one precept of your religion:​
• Your religion preaches the sanctity of suffering, add Petition: Suffering​
• Your religion is cultish and insular, add Petition: Gaining Secrets​
• Your religion has important sacrificial rites, add Petition: Offering​
• Your religion believes in trial by combat, add Petition: Personal Victory​
Divine Guidance
When you petition your deity according to the precept of your religion, you are granted some useful knowledge or boon related to your deity’s domain. The GM will tell you what.​

I think that this move can put distinctive demands on the GM - especially deciding whether to go with a boon or a soft GM move. But I think it's reasonably clear how it works: When a player describes their character doing something that triggers a move, that move happens and its rules apply (p 18). So if the cleric does something that falls under the petition that pertains to their precept (ie suffers, gains a secret, makes an offering or achieves a personal victory) then the move has been made and the GM has to do his/her bit..

For instance, if the cleric whose religion believes in trial by combat achieves a personal victory, then s/he has made the Divine Guidance move and hence the GM tells her what boon or knowledge s/he receives. Suppose her deity's domain is Civilisation, then maybe the cleric gains insight into the customs of the defeated enemy (say +1 forward to next Parley attempt against a similar sort of being). Or maybe the PC gains a vision of the larger threat of which the defeated foe is a harbinger (Reveal an Unwelcome Truth).
 
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Tun Kai Poh

Adventurer
I've run two sessions of Cthulhu Dark, both spontaneous one-shots. To be honest, having used this system I couldn't imagine using a different one for CoC RPGing.
It's really simple and good! I also like a couple of its descendants:

Trophy Dark, designed for one-shots about doomed adventurers, with a cunning 5-part adventure format. I've had good fun with this. It's available in this Codex anthology.

And Cthulhu Deep Green, a tribute to Delta Green using Cthulhu Dark mechanics. It explores the twin horrors of modern Mythos conspiracies and work-life balance.
 



Campbell

Relaxed Intensity
Just played the first season of a 2 part funnel game using the play test rules for Freebooters on the Frontier 2nd Edition. Playing in a biweekly Monster of the Week game where we flirt with the dark side while occasionally stopping monsters. Going to be playing in a game of A Town Called Malice (Nordic Noir) soon.
 

Nebulous

Legend
From pp 92-93:

Choose one precept of your religion:​
• Your religion preaches the sanctity of suffering, add Petition: Suffering​
• Your religion is cultish and insular, add Petition: Gaining Secrets​
• Your religion has important sacrificial rites, add Petition: Offering​
• Your religion believes in trial by combat, add Petition: Personal Victory​
Divine Guidance
When you petition your deity according to the precept of your religion, you are granted some useful knowledge or boon related to your deity’s domain. The GM will tell you what.​

I think that this move can put distinctive demands on the GM - especially deciding whether to go with a boon or a soft GM move. But I think it's reasonably clear how it works: When a player describes their character doing something that triggers a move, that move happens and its rules apply (p 18). So if the cleric does something that falls under the petition that pertains to their precept (ie suffers, gains a secret, makes an offering or achieves a personal victory) then the move has been made and the GM has to do his/her bit..

For instance, if the cleric whose religion believes in trial by combat achieves a personal victory, then s/he has made the Divine Guidance move and hence the GM tells her what boon or knowledge s/he receives. Suppose her deity's domain is Civilisation, then maybe the cleric gains insight into the customs of the defeated enemy (say +1 forward to next Parley attempt against a similar sort of being). Or maybe the PC gains a vision of the larger threat of which the defeated foe is a harbinger (Reveal an Unwelcome Truth).
I posted that in discord for the cleric player to read. We play this evening.
 


Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
Supporter
First, one of the players is running a bit of Don't Rest Your Head - in which you play characters so fatigued by insomnia that they break through into the land of dreams and nightmares. This game usually doesn't run for too long - characters either resolve the issues that caused their insomnia and return to normal life, crash fast asleep so that the nightmares catch them, or go mad and become a nightmare themselves...
Holy Svirfneblin Batman, this game is awesome. I'm giving it a close read and I'm maybe half way through and I have already fallen deeply and madly in love with the dice mechanics. Thanks for the recommendation.
 


Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
Supporter
Glad you like it. I think our first session of play is apt to be this coming Tuesday. I'll let you know how it goes.
I'd love to hear how it goes. Have you had a chance to read the second book, Don't Lose Your Mind? I saw it sitting there staring at me when I was on Drive Thru, but wasn't going to grab it until I was finished with the core book and maybe more sure I wanted another helping of insomnia.
 

Monayuris

Adventurer
Ran two sessions of Stars Without Number.

Very fun system. Really scratching my Firefly / The Expanse itch. I actually started the game by converting a Traveller adventure, but once that starting adventure is finished, I'm going to unleash the full power of the Stars Without Number sandbox style game play.

The concept for the campaign is that the players are independent privateers, loosely supported by an Isaac Asimov Foundation-like organization.
 


Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Just played the first season of a 2 part funnel game using the play test rules for Freebooters on the Frontier 2nd Edition. Playing in a biweekly Monster of the Week game where we flirt with the dark side while occasionally stopping monsters. Going to be playing in a game of A Town Called Malice (Nordic Noir) soon.
My sons have agreed to play Freebooters. Just have to find time, as one works And the other’s in classes for another couple weeks.
 

pemerton

Legend
Ran two sessions of Stars Without Number.

Very fun system. Really scratching my Firefly / The Expanse itch. I actually started the game by converting a Traveller adventure, but once that starting adventure is finished, I'm going to unleash the full power of the Stars Without Number sandbox style game play.

The concept for the campaign is that the players are independent privateers, loosely supported by an Isaac Asimov Foundation-like organization.
I have some versions of Stars Without Number - free downloads, so I'm not sure where they're at relative to the state of the art of that system.

I currenlty have an active Classic Traveller game, so I was curious (i) which adventure have you converted, and (ii) what SwN offers that's different from Traveller?
 

Tun Kai Poh

Adventurer
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Our 9th session of Blades in the Dark: Nameless Vagabonds!

Our crew hired the Fog Hounds, a smuggling gang with a steam ship, for a risky trip out to an old Navy gunnery range in the Void Sea. Their destination: the wreck of an old Skovland blockade runner. The cargo: six ghosts who wanted to return to their beloved ship.

During a storm, the ship was boarded by a sea demon, Setarra, who claimed they owed a toll for passing through her waters. Fortunately, Karen the Whisper was an acquaintance of the demon, and convinced her to accept 1/3 of the treasure on the wreck they were going to find, instead of 1/3 of the ghosts they had as cargo.

The uneasy standoff resolved, the crew made it to Glass Reef, the site where the old smuggler ship had been sunken as a naval gunnery target. Scotch the Hound suited up for a dive while the others kept an eye out for naval patrols.

Once Scotch had located the wreck, the ghosts dashed down to find their final resting place. As payment, they revealed a secret compartment that the Navy had never found. This contained some ingots of spirit-enchanted silver, which could be used to make demon-slaying munitions.

That was when Scotch felt a tap on her shoulder, and slammed her diving knife into the figure who had appeared behind her. Setarra merely smiled and returned the knife, then took a third of the silver ingots as her toll. And told Scotch to hurry before the other ship arrived...

On the surface, another ship appeared from around the reef, with searchlights pointing at the Fog Hounds' ship. "This is the Imperial Navy Ship Cataclysm! Prepare to be boarded!"

The Fog Hound captain enacted a plan to shine searchlights back, bluffing that they too were a Navy patrol ship. Scotch came back up in time to help with a Navy code book which she had acquired in a flashback.

"We'll flash them a message indicating we're on a secret mission...ending with the phrase 'Donkey Balls.'"

But the other ship didn't seem to recognise the code. Through a series of hails and counter-hails, both our crew and the opposing ship tried to claim that they were legitimate Navy patrol ships.

Eventually the enemy ship broke cover and accused our crew of "ALSO pretending to be a Navy ship," and suddenly a stern chase was on! Zhao the Spider acquired Navy signal flares through a flashback and fired them as a bluff to buy time, Irfan the Leech upgraded the boiler with Fire Oil, and Scotch took some sniper shots at the pursuing ship's search lights. As the Fog Hounds retreated the way they came, Karen called upon Setarra to check if they would incur a second toll by passing through her turf, but fortunately, Setarra was happy to let them through.

Shortly, the crew watched as their pursuer lost power and chaos ensued aboard it. Now another ship had to pay Setarra's toll. And so the Vagabonds and the Fog Hounds returned to Doskvol with a rich treasure (10 Coin) and all their souls still intact!
 

Ulfgeir

Explorer
I GM'd my quickstart-scenario of The Troubleshooters last Friday for my gaming group. They didn't finish the adventure, but they had fun. We were supposed to have played Vampire the Masquerade 5e, but the GM cancelled on the morning as he was sick. So I was asked if I could jump in. And now that the kickstarter is up and running, I really need to step up my adventure-writing... ;)

And yesterday played Fate Accelerated: Gods & Monsters. One of the characters did something that will have some rather serious consequences for the game-world. Sure we might normally only have continued 1-2 hours more anyways, but the GM said he would have to take a break and think on just how bad the consequences were due to that action. Given that we play minor gods that actually create/change things in the world, and that character was the one that had created the flow of time, and was responsible for magic, and he might have just killed of parts of himself here)...

Edit: Just to give you an idea of just HOW badly he screwed up, I need to say something about the setting. It is an early world with nomadic people, a great plain, The Rugged peaks and The First City (basically the only city). We found out that there were ruins of another city in the wast desert. That was the Ruins of Those that came Before. And those ruins should NOT exist.

The character had together with his twin sister split themselves into halves, and then combined themselves into one being. The other halves were sacrificed to power the magic needed when he/she created time. So during the day, the character is a woman dressed in white, and during the night a man dressed in black. The character somehow had an encounter with something extremely dangerous and powerful, and that infected him/her. So to save himself, he locked the infected half together with this other spirit-being into a magical crystal, and left to the ruins of those that came before, where we had previously encountered another version of the Time rune, and his other self. The other self had chasticed him for being there. It was extremely dangerous. He if anyone should know. When he got there (just before sunset) his other self was already in the male from. They joined together, and then the character went and destroyed the magical crystal. It was at this point the GM said he needed to think of exactly how bad the consequences were of that.

My character had encountered that dangeous otherwordly being before, and it had affected me to some extent. It had also corrupted most of the druids that belonged to one of the other characters. My character is The Maiden of Dreams. She is a fragment of Chaos, that had taken the humans side against her siblings (if the rest of Chaos came into the world, the world would cease to be). Her purpose is literally to make sure that mankind remembers the evil nasty stuff out there.. and she is frightened enough of that being that she doesn't want anything at all to do with it.
 
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uzirath

Adventurer
I ran a GURPS Dungeon Fantasy game this weekend for a neighborhood family that wanted to learn how to play. My eight- and ten-year-old sat with me on the front porch while the other family (two adults and two kids) sat in their living room. We spoke through the screen windows; I had a big whiteboard so that I could sketch maps and whatnot that everyone could see. The group was eclectic, in the fine tradition of fantasy games, including a gnome bard, elf druid, human scout, cat-folk martial artist, human knight, and faerie dragon wizard. Once I saw that they had a druid, scout, and faerie dragon, I thought a wilderness adventure would be more appropriate than a dungeon. I loosely used the 4e Chaos Scar adventures, “Elves of the Valley," from Dungeon 178 (May 2010). I had to adjust the adventure on the fly to make it fit within our allotted time, but every character had a few moments to shine and the players were eager for another session.

A highlight was when the druid attempted to summon a bear ally but critically failed her casting, causing the spirit of the bear to inhabit the petite faerie dragon, who promptly let out a roar and charged into melee combat. This was one of those failed rolls that dovetailed perfectly with the themes of the adventure since the demonic "Voice in the Darkness" at the heart of the wood was causing all sorts of bizarre magical anomalies.

Running a game from the front porch was better than VTT, especially with new players, but not nearly as good as being together around a table. (And the lawnmower across the street was maddening!)
 

Monayuris

Adventurer
I have some versions of Stars Without Number - free downloads, so I'm not sure where they're at relative to the state of the art of that system.

I currently have an active Classic Traveler game, so I was curious (i) which adventure have you converted, and (ii) what SWN offers that's different from Traveler?
I converted Pirates of Drinax Module 1 - Honor Among Thieves.

I may or may not use the rest of the series, it was mainly something to jump start the game. My idea is to set the campaign in motion, open the game up to a sandbox style, but sprinkle in other modules from the series here and there.

I've played a bit of Classic Traveler back in the day (but I haven't touched it in quite a while, so my rules knowledge is hazy).

From my point of view, it provides a similar game experience. It sits in that more hard-scifi than Star Wars/Star Trek style game and supports a sandbox approach. SWN does this by providing a 'tag' system to planets and systems. Tags are pre-packaged environments/situations that can be applied to a planet and provide a baseline 'what's going on with this place' that can be expanded upon when needed. They're kind of a short hand for noting what kind of adventures can be had on a given planet.

You can create a couple systems with planets and give them a couple tags each and have enough to tell players what each system is like. Then if they decide to go to one, the tag gives you enough prompts to build out an adventure or even improvise if needed.

I'm using SWN because it uses classic D&D rules as its back-bone, so it is immediately familiar to anyone who plays 5E or B/X or any other D&D (which is the case for my group). I think SWN is, in general, less detailed than Traveler, but I can see importing some Traveler subsystems into SWN without much issue.

It is both a complete game and a toolkit. It provides a very loosely defined base setting but leaves a lot to be developed. It does not include any default alien races (or even require such to exist). The existence and nature of Alien cultures, A.I. robots droids, transhumanism, etc... are all up to the GM/players to determine It does provide very complete and detailed rules for each of these concepts, but the game leaves it to you to include or exclude them.

The game uses character classes instead of life paths. There are 4 classes... Warrior, Expert, Psychic, Adventurer. Warriors are your soldier types they have the best hit points and are good with weapons (they have a special ability to turn a missed attack into a hit or negate a hit against them once per combat). Experts are skilled characters (they have a special ability to re-roll a failed skill check once per scene). Psychics possess psychic powers. Adventurers represent a cross-class or multi-class character. My game was 1 Warrior, 1 Adventurer (Warrior/Expert), and 4 Experts. The 4 Experts felt unique and each contributed to the game (there was a little overlap in skills, but they weren't carbon copies). To me, even though it is a class system, it maintains a lot of differentiation and supports unique character concepts.

The system is pretty straightforward. Skills work like Traveler skills - you can have a skill at 0 to 4 or 5 I think. 2d6 + skill + ability mod vs a target number. I'm not 100% sure how this compares to Traveler, but it assumes an 8 is a challenge for a professional, 10 is world class challenge, 12 represents something extremely difficult to someone who is top in the field. There are elements called Foci that work like feats - they grant special knacks and tricks that specialize your character. You can have two characters with Program-1 but the one with the Hacker Focus will be more specialized.

Attacks are d20 + skill + ability mod vs AC. We only had one combat so still learning the game, but for the most part it plays like old school D&D. At low levels combat can be very deadly. You do get additional hit points as you level. Psionics exist, but none of my players rolled up a psychic so I haven't seen those rules in action, yet.

We didn't get into starship combat, it does seem like the ship combat subsystem may provide opportunities for characters not built for space combat to contribute. There are rules for time it takes to travel intra-system and time it takes to jump to other systems. This is important because there is a cost per crew per day in operating that needs to be accounted for. The scale of the game is interesting for someone who usually runs fantasy. It can take a couple days to get from the edge of a system (where you arrive after a jump) to a planet... I'm used to players hiking a few hours to the dungeon.
 

Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
I GM'd my quickstart-scenario of The Troubleshooters last Friday for my gaming group. They didn't finish the adventure, but they had fun. We were supposed to have played Vampire the Masquerade 5e, but the GM cancelled on the morning as he was sick. So I was asked if I could jump in. And now that the kickstarter is up and running, I really need to step up my adventure-writing... ;)
Interested to hear a sentence or two about how you felt Troubleshooters went? Or maybe over on the Troubleshooters thread, which I am watching also...
 

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