Best Quality in a GM

kitsune9

Adventurer
The other day I was thinking about my GM-fu and of course, I always look for ways to improve it by reading blogs, posts here and a couple of other places, and just published stuff. My question is when you play, what’s the best quality your GM has? What is it about him or her that makes the game "kewl"?
 

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renau1g

First Post
I DM for my group and I find that the best thing I can do for them is be open to their suggestions for the game/direction. Flexibility is key and thinking on your feet works wonders. Letting them guide my story and being adaptive/reactive to their desires (stated and unstated) is what I try to do.
 

kitsune9

Adventurer
I DM for my group and I find that the best thing I can do for them is be open to their suggestions for the game/direction. Flexibility is key and thinking on your feet works wonders. Letting them guide my story and being adaptive/reactive to their desires (stated and unstated) is what I try to do.

Ah, but is this the same quality that you've played under a GM that has worked for you or was it something else?
 

DM_Jeff

Explorer
The rare few times I play, I really want to play. In fact, I don't know of many who don't, obviously. With that being the case I want a GM who's active in the game, always presenting situations, obstacles, feedback and interaction. I want someone who can control pace and not let the group lollygag around accomplishing nothing. A GM who's organized so when things happen there's no waiting around for them to 'suddenly get ready. A GM who knows how to go 'round the table altering the spotlight, not just on one or two folks.

So: best quality? Activity & attentiveness.

-DM Jeff
 
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Mallus

Legend
The ability to compromise (which assumes the ability to listen).

Followed closely by the ability to improvise, general creativity, and the will required to not become overly attached to your creations.
 

tylerthehobo

Explorer
Definitely "hearing" your players is the most important thing. I've run many a game where the party derailed things really quickly, but instead of taking umbrage, I rolled with it (OK, you don't want to clear the keep of monsters, but instead want to set up a mercantile operation in the village?) and some - not all - but some of those side treks have been some of our more memorable games.

Handouts are always big. Having different voices/accents prepared for the NPCs can work if that's a skill you've got. Delegating the rules to another player - often the rules lawyer - that'll help speed you up. Letting the players who want to be experts on something (again rules, or the campaign, or skill checks or what have you) shine is key.
 


kitsune9

Adventurer
The rare few times I play, I really want to play. In fact, I don't know of many who don't, obviously. With that being the case I want a GM who's active in the game, always presenting situations, obstacles, feedback and interaction. I want someone who can control pace and not let the group lollygag around accomplishing nothing. A GM who's organized so when things happen there's no waiting around for them to 'suddenly get ready. A GM who knows how to go 'round the table altering the spotlight, not just on one or two folks.

So: best quality? Activity & attentiveness.

-DM Jeff

I think that if I had my choice, this would be it too. I feel that DM's who are engaged, organized, and ready will present the best adventures even if they are poorly written by the worst and most absurd authors on the market.
 

kitsune9

Adventurer
Definitely "hearing" your players is the most important thing. I've run many a game where the party derailed things really quickly, but instead of taking umbrage, I rolled with it (OK, you don't want to clear the keep of monsters, but instead want to set up a mercantile operation in the village?) and some - not all - but some of those side treks have been some of our more memorable games.

Handouts are always big. Having different voices/accents prepared for the NPCs can work if that's a skill you've got. Delegating the rules to another player - often the rules lawyer - that'll help speed you up. Letting the players who want to be experts on something (again rules, or the campaign, or skill checks or what have you) shine is key.

I love giving out handouts too. I write at least two or three handouts per mod. If it's a large mod, I'll have about six to 10.
 


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