D&D 5E Content Warning Labels? Yeah or Nay?


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Faolyn

(she/her)
And it's crawling with fey.....er, fay.....uh, faigh.....feigh.....hell, whatever they are there's a lot of 'em and they're about to swarm us! :)
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BookTenTiger

He / Him
This is a little off topic, but I thought you'd enjoy it.

In a parenting book I read recently, the author proposes the theory that some mythology was created to help kids remember how to stay safe in the world. For example, the legendary kelpie is a horse that lives in the water and likes to drag those who stray too close into the depths to drown. A kid is going to remember that way better than the rule "don't go near the water without your parents."

This author then started creating myths around her house. For example, her kid always left the fridge door open after getting out juice, so they created the "refrigerator monster" who normally is too cold to move, but warms up when the door is left open... Her kid loved it, added to the myth herself, and now remembers to close the fridge door!
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
This is a little off topic, but I thought you'd enjoy it.

In a parenting book I read recently, the author proposes the theory that some mythology was created to help kids remember how to stay safe in the world. For example, the legendary kelpie is a horse that lives in the water and likes to drag those who stray too close into the depths to drown. A kid is going to remember that way better than the rule "don't go near the water without your parents."

This author then started creating myths around her house. For example, her kid always left the fridge door open after getting out juice, so they created the "refrigerator monster" who normally is too cold to move, but warms up when the door is left open... Her kid loved it, added to the myth herself, and now remembers to close the fridge door!
This aligns pretty well with how most folklore was low culture. I.e., created and shared among the peasantry, where children would face more danger than a child of a noble or wealthy family.
 

This aligns pretty well with how most folklore was low culture. I.e., created and shared among the peasantry, where children would face more danger than a child of a noble or wealthy family.
Is this clail supported by data? It's really interesting but I've never seen studies that differentiated children survival rate accorsing to class (prospect was bleak in both cases). I guess that a nurse would be supervising the richer child and he would be less exposed to extenuous labor, but I figured it would show at a statistical level only after the industrial revolution.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Is this clail supported by data? It's really interesting but I've bever seen studies that differentiated children survival rate accorsing to class. I girss that a nirse would be supervising the richer child and he would be less exposed to extenuous labor, but I figured it would show at a statistical level only after the industrial revolution.
Nothing's much changed from 1000 years ago to now, in the context of how wealthier families generally have better access to healthcare, food, education, and security. Add in the lack of any child labor laws back then, and the gap becomes even greater.
 

S'mon

Legend
This is a little off topic, but I thought you'd enjoy it.

In a parenting book I read recently, the author proposes the theory that some mythology was created to help kids remember how to stay safe in the world. For example, the legendary kelpie is a horse that lives in the water and likes to drag those who stray too close into the depths to drown. A kid is going to remember that way better than the rule "don't go near the water without your parents."

This author then started creating myths around her house. For example, her kid always left the fridge door open after getting out juice, so they created the "refrigerator monster" who normally is too cold to move, but warms up when the door is left open... Her kid loved it, added to the myth herself, and now remembers to close the fridge door!

I tried that approach - my son said it gave him nightmares for years... #parentingfail
 

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