Cookin again

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Supporter
There seems to be a lot of salty stuff in that omelette. Like, I can see looking at putting all that in and thinking it would be salty enough. Other than the spinach and maybe the tomatoes (depending on how cooked they got) that's an omelette I'd eat.
The pork & Chachere’s have some saltiness while the onion cheddar, bbq and sour cream all have some tang to them.

But Mom & I have always been like the salt eaters from Star Trek. It’s only because of a diagnosis of extreme salt-dependent hypertension- the worst in that doctor’s 40+ years of practice- that I’ve managed to change that for myself with a lot of consciousness effort.

Since I’m the main family cook, that effort has translated into lower-sodium meals for everyone. So that complaint is pretty familiar.😁
 

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CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
Here's what I'm cooking for the Session Zero this weekend.

Sticky Pig
(oven-roasted pork butt)

Ingredients:
1 bone-in pork shoulder, 4-10 pounds
Molasses
Brown sugar
Pickling salt
Water

Instructions:
1. Wash the pork shoulder and pat dry. Place it in a large dutch oven or food-grade bucket, some kind of container large enough to completely submerge it in liquid. Because that's what you're gonna do!

2. Make enough brine to completely cover the pork shoulder. To each quart of cold water, use 1 tablespoon pickling salt, 1/4 cup brown sugar, and 1/4 cup molasses. Stir until completely dissolved, pour over the pork roast, and then repeat as necessary until the pork roast is submerged.

3. Place it in the fridge overnight.

4. Remove from the brine and place it fat-side-up on your roasting rack. Do not rinse or pat it dry. Leave it to rest, uncovered, for 2-3 hours or until it comes up to room temperature. Preheat your oven to 500°F.

5. Slash the fat cap in a cross-hatch pattern to help it render out. Place the roast into the ripping-hot oven, uncovered, and sear it for 30 minutes.

6. Without opening the oven, reduce the oven temperature to 250°F and cook for another 30 minutes, plus 20 minutes per pound (thus a six-pound roast would need to cook for 3 hours: 30 minutes for the sear, and 30 minutes + (120) minutes roasting.)

7. Check for doneness; the bone should wiggle easily ("like a loose tooth," my dad would say). If not, cook an additional 20 minutes and check again.

8. Remove the roast from the oven, tent with foil, and allow to rest for 20 minutes. Then remove the bone (save it for your next pot of beans!), and shred the meat with two forks. Serve over rice with your favorite barbecue sauce, some warm Hawaiian rolls, and some crunchy coleslaw.
 
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Zardnaar

Legend
Selection of various yummy things from last week or two.

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Turkish chicken shish kebab with hot sauce.

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Cheese and onion toastie potato chips.

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Ham and cheese toastie I had with onion ham in the cabinet.

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Butter chicken pie.

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Cream donut.
 




Zardnaar

Legend
Making a beef and rice kinda burrito.

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Marinaded in EVOO, garlic, extra hot habenero, sweet chilli and smokey bbq sauce. Serving it with salad and caramelized onion hummus.

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The results. Was quite good.
 
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Zaukrie

New Publisher
Bought five new cookbooks....I should probably use them. So far, they've been good recipes, but not great. Also, I keep realizing I don't actually have the ingredients, after I start. Still, the concepts have generally worked, as you'd expect from ATK.
 

prabe

Tension, apprension, and dissension have begun
Supporter
Bought five new cookbooks....I should probably use them. So far, they've been good recipes, but not great. Also, I keep realizing I don't actually have the ingredients, after I start. Still, the concepts have generally worked, as you'd expect from ATK.
I've found ATK's recipes to me wonderful starting points, amenable to tweaking to individual tastes, and mostly adaptable to what equipment you have in your kitchen.
 

Zaukrie

New Publisher
I'm going to try more Ottelenghi recipes this fall and winter. Also, a lot more vegetarian meals. Two of the new books are veggie heavy.
 

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